Category Archives: AFC North

Cincinnati Bengals 2022 NFL Draft /UDFA recap

Where would the Bengals go in this year’s draft after winning the AFC championship? Traditionally, the draft has yielded fine results for the franchise. In this century, the Bengals’ front office/scouts have drafted a number players who either made the Pro Bowl for them or other teams. In 2001 alone, they drafted T.J. Houshmandzadeh, Justin Smith and Chad Johnson. In 2003, they drafted Carson Palmer.

In 2006, the team drafted two eventual Pro Bowlers in Johnathan Joseph (1st Round, 24th overall) and Andrew Whitworth (2nd Round, 55th overall). Their fourth round pick, Domata Peko, played until he was 36 years old and all three players played at least until that age, with Whitworth recently retiring as a Super Bowl champion at the age of 40.

Cincinnati Bengals
     
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (31)
Daxton Hill
S-Nickel/Michigan
11/1st Round
Hill, basically a starting nickel at Michigan on base downs, could get an opportunity to fulfill a variety of sub-package roles early in Cincinnati. Could they even experiment with him as a corner?
2 (60)
Acquired from Tampa Bay via the Bills
Cam Taylor-Britt
CB/Nebraska
53/2nd Round
Taylor-Britt is yet another fast, instinctive corner with safety experience. DC Lou Anarumo is cooking up different coverage/pressure concepts in his living room as we speed.
3 (95)
Zachary Carter
DE-DT/Florida
145/3rd Round
Carter's ability to slide up-and-down the defensive line for the Gators provided a blueprint for the Bengals. They could use him as a sub-package three-technique on third downs.
4 (136)
Cordell Volson
OT/North Dakota State
417/5th Round
Volson has the size, experience on the edges to become a factor as another swing offensive lineman for the Bengals, who have made it a priority to increase its interior offensive line depth in this year's draft.
5 (166)
Acquired from Arizona via Philadelphia through Houston via Chicago
Tycen Anderson
S-Nickel/Toledo
163/3rd Round
Anderson is yet another defensive back whose overall psyche never seemed to change when challenged inside. He played safety, corner and nickel for the Rockets and handled all of the roles adequately. He is the third Bengals defensive back with 4.3 speed (4.36).
7 (252)
Jeffrey GunterDE-OLB/Coastal Carolina178/4th RoundAt the beginning of the year, many expected Gunter to be a second-or-third-round draft pick, but he ends up potentially being a steal in the seventh round. He took a step back as a senior, but did show inside rush potential in the postseason.
2022 UDFA signings
Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty’ Take
147Devin CochranOTGeorgia Tech, Vanderbilt5.7443rd RoundBlessed with an 86-inch wingspan, could Cochran forge his way onto the Bengals roster this summer? If so, he’ll have to beat talented backup OTs D’Ante Smith (one start) or Isaiah Prince (four starts).
387Shermari JonesRBCoastal Carolina5.095th RoundAt 215 pounds, there is a measure of upside running some of the two-back outside search or stretch concepts many teams employ. With the measure of acceleration he possesses in a 20-to-30-yard stretch, it is not out of the question that he could return kicks.
460Jaivon HeilighWRCoastal Carolina4.835th RoundHis route discipline and body control are aided by 32” arms. The first-team All-Sun Belt WR finished his career with 22 TDs.
462Clarence HicksLBUTSA4.825th RoundHicks often rushed off the edge and defeated tackles as a pass rusher one snap before walking out over the slot on the next play. Hicks was one of the most productive defenders in C-USA football.
474Jack SorensonWRMiami (Ohio)4.785th RoundThe strength is not where it needs to be, hence the continued durability issues. When he’s been healthy, Sorenson was one of the most dangerous receivers in the MAC. He finished with over 1,400 yards receiving this past season.
499Carson WellsOLBColorado4.686th RoundWells has all of the physical tools to perhaps work himself into a role as a stand-up Rush OLB. In 2021, he began to speed up the process as a rusher. Wells finished with 39 career tackles for losses.
532Ben BrownOC-OGOle Miss4.5676th RoundSnaps were a problem at center in 2020 before going down to injury. He has the size and overall quickness to perhaps find an interior role.
590Kendric PryorWRWisconsin4.286th RoundPryor didn’t get a lot of opportunities in a run-based offense, but finished his career with 99 receptions. He also averaged over 10 yards per carry on 40 rushes.
612Tariqious TisdaleDE-DTOle Miss4.1757th RoundTisdale runs in the 4.5-range at 290 pounds and began to flash in 2020. He never took the next step in 2021, but it doesn’t mean there isn’t a light at the end of the tunnel.
677Stewart ReeseOG-OTFlorida, Mississippi State3.877th RoundReese, a multi-year starter at two different schools, is a people mover who needs to maintain his weight.
685Brendan Radley-HilesSWashington, Oklahoma3.7217th RoundRadley-Hiles exhibits a short memory and often came back from mistakes as a nickel back at two different stops. Is the size going to translate?
Delonte HoodCBPeru St, Toledo, Glenville StateN/AN/AHood posted eight interceptions at Glenville State in 2019. He ran in the 4.4-range during the postseason and registered eight passes defensed this past season.
Jordan WilsonTEFSU, UCLAN/AN/AAfter flashing early in his career, Wilson resurfaced at FSU. He has size, but can he win as a route runner?
Justin RiggTEKentuckyN/AN/AOne of the best blocking TEs in the draft, Rigg finished with 50 receptions in his career. He could potentially surprise and make the team. He finished with four TDs in 2021.
Cal AdomitisLSPittsburghN/AN/AHe is satisfactory in coverage and generally capable of getting players on the ground if needed. It’s all about the details for Adomitis, who is often seen replicating his short-snapping motion before putting his hands on the ball prior to field goals. He handled even fronts with late twists well dating back to 2019.
Desmond NoelOGFAUN/AN/AHas started at the LG spot. 31 reps at 225 pounds on his Pro Day. He will play through pain. Just 290 pounds. gets caught leaning at the point of attack in the run game (Marshall '20).

It wasn’t until the next decade began that the team got back on a roll, with three of its first five selections in 2010 becoming eventual Pro Bowlers. That group included tight end Jermaine Gresham and defensive end Carlos Dunlap. But they made up for the two-year drought by also drafting Geno Atkins in the fourth round (120th overall). Atkins became an eight-time Pro Bowler and two-time All-Pro.

And in 2011?

That draft yielded seven-time Pro Bowler A.J. Green and three-time Pro Bowler Any Dalton. Both players recently signed one-year deals at the ages of 33 and 34, respectively.

In 2012, Bengals first-round pick Dre Kirkpatrick never made a Pro Bowl, but played through the age of 32. In fact, no players from this draft class ever made a Pro Bowl, but at least five players made it to the age of 30 years old in the NFL.

There have no doubt been misses along the way as well. The next four drafts (2013-2016) yielded just one Pro Bowler, Tyler Eifert (2013), and many of the team’s draft picks flamed out relatively quickly. However, in that same span, the team drafted a number of solid NFL starters that have found success either in Cincinnati or otherwise. Those names include, but are not limited to: Giovani Bernard (2nd Round, 37th overall, 2013), Rex Burkhead (6th Round, 190th overall, 2013), C.J. Uzomah (5th Round, 157th overall, 2015), William Jackson III (1st Round, 24th overall, 2016) and Tyler Boyd (2nd Round, 55th overall, 2016). A seventh-round pick from the 2016 draft class, Clayton Fejedelem, has carved out a respectable career.

In 2017, the team found a building block in Pro Bowl running back Joe Mixon (2nd Round, 48th overall). Carl Lawson secured a payday with the New York Jets last offseason and Pro Bowl kicker Jake Elliott (5th Round, 153rd overall) has won a Super Bowl with the Eagles.

The jury is still out on the most recent drafts, but the selections of Joe Burrow, Ja’Marr Chase, Tee Higgins and Evan McPherson all significantly contributed to the team’s Super Bowl appearance this past season.

Thus, the likelihood of this year’s draft class producing at least two quality starters remains possible. The Bengals added plenty of speed in the secondary, drafting three defensive backs who ran in the sub-4.4-range. Can Daxton Hill beat out incumbent nickel back Mike Hilton for the starting job? If not, then what about Jessie Bates III back deep along with either Hill or fifth-round choice Tycen Anderson. Depth was added along the offensive line the entire offseason and didn’t stop in the draft. NDSU’s Cordell Volson could realistically remain outside, but may very well provide depth on the interior. Zachary Carter put up nine sacks in 2021, but he’s been productive over a two-year period. This team understood that other than on the offensive line, there weren’t many needs on that side of the ball.

Baltimore Ravens 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA recap

Ravens GM Eric DeCosta came away with potential impact players at nearly every position. At safety, the team got an instant starter in Hamilton and potentially another impact defender in Ojabo, who may be a year away from contributing. Linderbaum should be ready to compete for the center position and, if so, then Patrick Mekari and Trystan Colon-Castillo should battle for a backup spot.

Baltimore Ravens       
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (14)Kyle Hamilton
S/Notre Dame
15/1st Round
Hamilton multi-purpose skill-set can be used in a number of different facets and that will only expand the fabric of the team's defensive capabilities. He should assume the role left behind by former safety DeShon Elliott.
1 (25)
Acquired this pick from the Philadelphia Eagles for its 22nd overall pick
Tyler Linderbaum
OC/Iowa
38/2nd Round
Linderbaum has shown more than enough in a pro-style collegiate scheme. As long as his size doesn't prove to be a detriment, then he has a chance to turn into an instant starter.
2 (45)
David Ojabo
DE-OLB/Michigan
64/2nd Round
If not for an Achilles injury on Michigan's Pro Day, he may have gone higher. New DC Mike Macdonald contained a unique feel of what Ojabo brings to the table.
3 (76)

Travis Jones
OT/UConn
44/2nd Round
Jones contains the skill to work over the center as a zero-or-one-technique NG, but he can play over an OG at the three-technique on occasion.
4 (110)
Daniel Faalele
OT/Minnesota
50/2nd Round
Faelele's light-footed nature makes him hard to get around if the DE doesn't time the snap count. His weight will only become a factor if he doesn't keep himself under the 400-pound mark.
4 (119)
Jalyn Armour-Davis
CB/
Alabama
136/3rd Round
Armour-Davis took some of the shine from more-heralded teammate Josh Jobe in 2021. The time he took away from the field to develop were offset by durability hiccups. He could serve the nickel role for the Ravens on the outside.
4 (128)
Charlie Kolar
TE/Iowa State
115/3rd Round
Kolar has the savvy, ball skills and Red Zone productivity to match the size. To play for Baltimore the blocking has to be in place. This is the worst part of his game at this point.
4 (130)
Jordan Stout
P/Penn State
435/5th Round
Perhaps the best directional punter in this year's class, Stout's ability to execute fakes (see Michigan), kick the longer field goals and kickoff made him one of the most versatile specialists in this year's class.
4 (139)Isaiah Likely
TE/Coastal Carolina
92/3rd Round
Likely's field speed, run after the catch skill and size complement satisfactory blocking skills when on the move.
4 (141)Damarion "Pepe" Williams
CB-Nickel/Houston
194/4th Round
Williams was one of the more aggressive players from the secondary in this year's draft despite standing 5'10, 183 pounds. He can play corner, nickel or safety if needed. His change of direction is outstanding at any of the positions.
6 (196) Tyler Badie
RB/Missouri
177/4th Round
Badie registered rush totals of 34, 27 and 41 over a three-game stretch in 2021. His workhorse capability won't be needed in Baltimore, where he will have to fight for a roster spot in a deep room.
UDFA 2022 signings
Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRound‘Nasty ’Take
121Zakoby McClainLBAuburn5.8433rd RoundCan McClain fill a role that was never replaced on the Ravens defense by former LB Kenny Young?
192Makai PolkWRMississippi State, California5.654th RoundPolk was a solid route runner who finished with over 100 receptions (105) in Mississippi State’s Air Raid attack. He simply needs to prove that he can separate from bump-and-run coverage.
266Charles WileyOLBUTSA5.4484th RoundWiley could buy the team time in a Tyus Bowser-type special teams role while learning how to use his 4.5 speed defensively as a pass rusher. He has a chance to earn a role on the kickoff and punt teams.
285Raleigh WebbAll-Purpose (Gunner-WR)The Citadel5.364th RoundOne of the draft’s best pure athletes, it will all come down to how much Webb impresses at gunner and on the kickoff team during camp. After playing in a run-oriented scheme, he has to learn a lot about the receiver spot. The size and speed are in place.
297Jeremiah MoonOLBFlorida5.314th RoundIt’s not often that 6’5”, 250 pounders get into undrafted free agent status, particularly after broad jumping over 11-feet. That type of explosion is rare, but Moon only flashed at Florida and never developed into a game changer.
379Ricky PersonRBNC State5.15th RoundA consistent, non-flashy runner would be the description for Person. He can protect well enough and catches the ball well out of the backfield. He’ll have competition in camp to even make the practice squad.
411Josh RossLBMichigan5.015th RoundKnock the size, knock the foot speed and whatever else. Macdonald understands that Ross is a natural playmaker with the necessary instincts to compete for a roster spot.
455Anthony BrownQBOregon, Boston College4.845th RoundQuite possibly another undervalued free agent find at QB in the mold of Tyler Huntley, Brown won 25 games in his college career at two different stops.
544Slade BoldenWR/All-purposeAlabama4.536th RoundIt will be tough to earn the slot receiver role for the Ravens in a stacked receiver room. He has been a consistent contributor on special teams at Alabama for a three-year period.
563Aron JohnsonOTSouth Dakota State4.446th RoundJohnson was a key piece in South Dakota State’s 2020-21 spring national championship run and 2021 national semifinal appearance. His experience and technique were high points.
640Emeka EmezieWRNC State4.1017th RoundAt 6-foot-3, Emezie didn’t do much to excite during postseason workouts. NC State’s all-time leading receiver won with technique and length in school. The body control will have to win when covered up.
Rayshad Nichols DLStephen F. AustinN/AN/AThe Louisiana native did more than just start a number of games for the Lumberjacks. The All-LSC selection finished with 10 sacks and 15.5 TFLs in 2021.
Shamar BridgesWRFort Valley StateN/AN/AAt 6-foot-4, with 34” arms, Bridges runs in the 4.5 range. Basketball-type quickness off the line of scrimmage but then drifts coming back to the football (PBU allowed, HBCU Legacy ’22). When working in the slot, displays the ability to change speeds and has another gear. long stride gets up on DBs and put them into panic mode when running box fades at No. 2 slot.
Denzel WilliamsCBVillanova, Sacred HeartN/AN/AWilliams has 4.4 speed that allows him to play a little bigger than his 5’10, 180-pound frame. His quickness and playmaking skill may have been overshadowed by teammate Christian Benford, but he flashed after transferring from Sacred Heart.
Trevon ClarkWRCal N/AN/AIn 12 games, Clark averaged nearly 20 yards per catch in 2021. There have been drops through contact (Nevada), but he had his moments this past season.
David VereenCBNewberryN/AN/AVereen finished his final year on campus with 12 pass breakups. At 5’9, 190, can he make a favorable camp impression at a nickel spot?
Chris Moore S Georgia State, Virginia N/AN/AMoore produced at a relatively sustained level at two different schools, but never produced a breakout season.

Travis Jones DT Baltimore Ravens
Travis Jones surprisingly lasted until the third round, where the Baltimore Ravens selected him with the 76th overall pick.

In the secondary, does Houston’s Demarrion “PePe” Williams attempt to fill the role left by often-injured Tavon Young? The Ravens defensive line may have secured its biggest coup by securing UConn DT Travis Jones. The selection of Jalyn Armour-Davis continues a theme of drafting Alabama cornerbacks with the hope of them finding success within the defensive structure. Can he replace the production vacated by Anthony Averett?

2022 NFL Free Agency, Live Updates: AFC North

The 2022 AFC North free agency period began with the Ravens thinking they had a former friend while the Bengals guarded the team’s future. The Browns scooped Cooper in a trade and the Steelers found a possible replacement for Big Ben. We have all of the latest updates from the division’s free agency and offseason moves.

AFC North

Baltimore Ravens

Offensive free agents

  • C Bradley Bozeman (Agreed to terms with the Panthers)
  • RB Devonta Freeman
  • RB Latavius Murray
  • FB Patrick Ricard (re-signed)
  • OT David Sharpe
  • TE Eric Tomlinson (Agreed to terms with the Broncos)
  • WR Sammy Watkins (Agreed to terms with the Packers)

Defensive free agents

  • LB Chris Board (Agreed to terms with Lions)
  • CB Anthony Averett (Agreed to terms with the Raiders)
  • LB Josh Bynes (re-signed)
  • DE Calais Campbell (re-signed)
  • S DeShon Elliott (Agreed to terms with the Lions)
  • NT Justin Ellis (Agreed to terms with the Giants)
  • LB L. J. Fort
  • OLB Justin Houston
  • S Tony Jefferson (re-signed)
  • OLB Pernell McPhee
  • CB Jimmy Smith
  • NT Brandon Williams
  • CB Tavon Young (released)

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Head coach John Harbaugh was signed to a three-year extension
  • Agreed to terms with S Marcus Williams (Saints) on a five-year deal, OLB OT Morgan Moses (Jets) on a three-year deal
  • Lost TE Eric Tomlinson (Broncos), CB Anthony Averett (Raiders), LB Chris Board (Lions), S DeShon Elliott (Lions), WR Sammy Watkins (Packers), DL Justin Ellis (Giants)
  • Released CB Tavon Young
  • Re-signed FB Patrick Ricard to a three-year deal, DE Calais Campbell to a two-year deal, LB Josh Bynes

Cleveland Browns

Offensive free agents

  • QB Nick Mullens
  • WR Rashard Higgins (Agreed to terms with the Panthers)
  • WR Ryan Switzer
  • TE David Njoku (franchised)
  • OT Chris Hubbard (re-signed)
  • TE Austin Hooper (released and signed with the Titans)
  • PK Chase McLaughlin
  • TE Stephen Carlson
  • FB Andy Janovich
  • WR Jarvis Landry (released)

Defensive free agents

  • DT Malik Jackson
  • DT Sheldon Day
  • DE Jadeveon Clowney
  • DE Takkarist McKinley
  • DE Ifeadi Odenigbo
  • LB Malcolm Smith
  • LB Anthony Walker
  • LB Elijah Lee
  • S Ronnie Harrison
  • S M.J. Stewart (Agreed to terms with the Texans)
  • P Dustin Colquitt
Former Houston Texans QB Deshaun Watson traded to the Cleveland Browns
Former Houston Texans QB Deshaun Watson was traded to the Cleveland Browns for three first-round draft picks, a 2023 third-round pick and a 2024 fourth-round pick.

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Reportedly traded three first-round picks to the Houston Texans for QB Deshaun Watson. They also gave up a 2023 third-round pick and 2024 fourth-round pick in the trade.
  • Agreed to terms with WR Jakeem Grant (Bears) on a three-year deal, DL Taven Bryan (Jaguars) on a one-year deal, QB Jacoby Brissett (Colts) on a one-year deal, OL Ethan Pocic (Seahawks)
  • Lost WR Rashard Higgins (Panthers), DB M.J. Stewart (Texans)
  • Placed the franchise tag on TE David Njoku, placed a RFA tender on RB D’Ernest Johnson
  • Traded LB Mack Wilson in exchange for OLB/DE Chase Winovich (Patriots)
  • Traded QB Case Keenum to the Buffalo Bills for a seventh-round pick
  • Released WR Jarvis Landry, TE Austin Hooper (signed with Titans)
  • Traded a 2022 fifth-round pick and swapped 2022 sixth-round selections with the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for WR Amari Cooper

Cincinnati Bengals

Offensive free agents

  • TE C.J. Uzomah (Agreed to terms with the Jets)
  • OT Riley Reiff
  • OG Quinton Spain
  • QB Brandon Allen (re-signed)
  • WR Mike Thomas (re-signed)
  • WR Auden Tate
  • OL Fred Johnson (released and then signed with Buccaneers)
  • OL Trey Hopkins (released)

Defensive free agents

  • S Jessie Bates III (franchised)
  • CB Eli Apple (re-signed)
  • CB Vernon Hargeaves
  • CB Tre Flowers
  • DT B.J. Hill (re-signed)
  • DT Josh Tupou (re-signed)
  • LB Jordan Evans
  • CB Darius Phillips (Agreed to terms with the Raiders)
  • CB Trae Waynes (released)
  • S Ricardo Allen
  • S Michael Thomas (re-signed)
  • LS Clark Harris
  • P Kevin Huber

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with OG Alex Cappa (Buccaneers) on a four-year deal, OL Ted Karras (Patriots) on a three-year deal, OT La’el Collins (Cowboys) to a three-year deal, TE Hayden Hurst (Falcons)
  • Re-signed DT B.J. Hill to a three-year deal, CB Eli Apple on a one-year deal, S Michael Thomas to a one-year deal, DT Josh Tupou on a two-year deal, QB Brandon Allen on a one-year deal, WR Trenton Irwin
  • Placed the franchise tag on S Jessie Bates III
  • Lost TE C.J. Uzomah (Jets), CB Darius Phillips (Raiders)
  • Released CB Trae Waynes

Pittsburgh Steelers

Offensive free agents

  • QB Ben Roethlisberger (retired)
  • QB Joshua Dobbs
  • WR JuJu Smith-Schuster (Agreed to terms with the Chiefs)
  • WR James Washington (Agreed to terms with the Cowboys)
  • WR-Ret Ray-Ray McCloud (Agreed to terms with the 49ers)
  • TE Eric Ebron
  • RB Kalen Ballage
  • OG Trai Turner
  • OT Chuks Okorafor (re-signed)
  • OL B.J. Finney
  • OL Zach Banner

Defensive free agents

  • DL Montravious Adams (re-signed)
  • OLB Taco Charlton
  • CB Joe Haden
  • CB Akhello Witherspoon (re-signed)
  • CB Arthur Maulet (re-signed)
  • S Terrell Edmunds
  • S Miles Killebrew (re-signed)
  • LB Joe Schobert (released)
Former Jaguars LB Myles Jack -an 82-game starter- signed a two-year deal with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • QB Ben Roethlisberger retired after 18 seasons and this will be GM Kevin Colbert’s last season
  • Re-signed OT Chuks Okorafor to a three-year deal, CB Arthur Maulet on a two-year deal, S Miles Killebrew on a two-year deal, CB Ahkello Witherspoon on a two-year deal, DT Montravius Adams (Saints) on a two-year deal
  • Released LB Joe Schobert, OL Zach Banner
  • Agreed to terms with LB Myles Jack (Jaguars) on a two-year deal, QB Mitchell Trubisky (Bills) on a two-year deal, OG James Daniels (Bears) on a three-year deal, C Mason Cole on a three-year deal, CB Levi Wallace (Bills) on a two-year deal, WR Gunner Olszewski (Patriots) on a two-year deal
  • Placed an original round tender on QB Dwayne Haskins, placed a first right-of-refusal tender on LB Robert Spillane
  • Lost WR JuJu Smith-Schuster (Chiefs), WR James Washington (Cowboys), WR-Ret Ray-Ray McCloud (49ers),

2021 NFL Draft Recap: AFC North

In the AFC North’s 2021 NFL Draft recap, the Ravens picked a couple of receivers to provide competition, the Bengals gave Chase his former QB and the Browns added another corner. In Pittsburgh, the Steelers decided to get back to playing bully ball with an emphasis on its lines and picked up a bruising running back along the way.

Baltimore Ravens     
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 27th overallBaltimore RavensRashod Bateman6’0 190/WR-Minnesota18/2nd RoundBateman gives Jackson yet another weapon after the signing of Sammy Watkins. The team is continuing to attempt to get it right at the position.
1st Round, 31st overallBaltimore RavensJayson Oweh6’5 252/DE-Penn State143/3rd RoundThe Ravens bet on Oweh’s upside, which includes 4.3 speed and very good upper body strength.
3rd Round, 94th overallBaltimore RavensBen Cleveland6’6 354/OT-Georgia92/3rd RoundIn today’s NFL, however, he is going to have to make sure that he becomes more efficient in pass protection. This becomes even more paramount when you weigh in the 355-pound range. It is at least pretty well-distributed on his 6-foot-6 frame. His experience and anticipation of how teams would attack on line games was much better in 2020.
3rd Round, 104th overallBaltimore RavensBrandon Stephens6’1 219/CB-SMU277/4th RoundStephens is a former running back who transitioned to cornerback in college and did so admirably. One of the things that makes that transition so hard is you’re seeing the game from the outside-in as opposed to inside-out. Technically, he is going to have to work on some things if he plans to stay on the perimeter.
4th Round, 131st overallBaltimore RavensTylan Wallace5’11 193 WR-Oklahoma State82/3rd RoundThe best projection for Wallace, who is a smooth route runner with body control, could be to the slot position. He is a bit of an enigma due to his build and injury history. He projects as a solid No. 3 receiver initially with an opportunity to grow into a No. 2 receiver.
5th Round,160th overallBaltimore Ravens (from Arizona Cardinals)Shaun Wade6’1 195/Nickel-Ohio State87/3rd RoundUnlike many of the Buckeyes’ pure cover corners, Wade had more experience playing the nickel back spot. At that spot, he has shown the ability to blitz, tackle, read route combinations, play man coverage and pass off routes in zone.
5th Round, 171st overallBaltimore RavensDaelin Hayes6'3 261/DE-OLB-Notre Dame139/3rd RoundHayes is a very good athlete with plenty of opportunity to become a better pro than collegian. Right when he was about to take off in 2019, he went down to injury against Virginia. His versatility is intriguing.
5th Round, 184th overallBaltimore Ravens (compensatory selection)Ben Mason6’2 256/TE-H-back-Michigan282/4th RoundMason is sort of a Patrick Mekari-clone. He could take the place of former Hayden Hurt in some of the team’s three tight end sets.
Cincinnati Bengals
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
5th overallCincinnati BengalsJa’Marr ChaseWR-LSU12/1st RoundChase re-unites with his former Heisman QB in hopes of re-igniting their 2019 national championship rhythm.
46th overallCincinnati Bengals (from New England Patriots)Jackson Carman6’5 317/OT-Clemson88/3rd RoundSome of his blocks in space were highlight film worthy. He can lean on defenders with his mass. Managing his weight, however, could help alleviate some of the technical flaws. Did the weight contribute to the former five-star recruit's recent back surgery in January 2021?
69th overallCincinnati BengalsJoseph Ossai6’3 255/LB-Texas120/3rd RoundThe notes kept piling up for Ossai as we broke down his game. In 2019, we were not at all that impressed with his work at the exchange linebacker position. In 2020, he turned it on as a defensive end. He set the edge versus tight ends, flattened on run away and used hip swivel to turn the corner on occasion versus offensive tackles.
111th overallCincinnati BengalsCam Sample6’2 274/DE-OLB-Tulane67/2nd RoundWhile he has played some as an inside-shade defensive end, the team is now using him to stand up and rush (as it has in the past) with his hand in the dirt. His increased feel of influencing the offensive tackle off of his third step up the field now complements his unique combination of power and hand usage.
122nd overallCincinnati BengalsTyler Shelvin6’2 350/DT-NG/LSU112/3rd RoundHe was not capable of being single blocked by one man and routinely required two blockers as the zero-technique or one-technique defensive tackle. His athleticism should not be underestimated. While at Northside High School (La.), he punted, kicked and played defense.
139th overallCincinnati Bengals (via New England Patriots (compensatory selection)D’Ante Smith6’5 305/OT-ECU81/3rd RoundThe ECU lineman does provide some positional versatility, having seen action at both left guard and left tackle in school. He combines with current Bengal Hakeem Adeniji to give the team added swing versatility.
149th overallCincinnati BengalsEvan McPherson5’11 177/PK-Florida407/5th RoundThe last Gators kicker to leave early for the NFL Draft was Eddy Pineiro, who actually is nearly identical in size to McPherson. Like McPherson, Piniero was extremely accurate while at Florida (88-percent). McPherson will compete with former Oklahoma PK Austin Seibert for the job in Cincinnati.
190th overallCincinnati BengalsTrey Hill6’4 330/OC-Georgia331/5th RoundHill is a true junior who was forced to play early in his career and responded favorably. The clean-up procedures that he went through on his knees in 2020 were due to pain, but prior to this year he had been relatively durable. Hill has a number of interior line veterans to compete with for a roster spot.
202nd overallCincinnati Bengals (from Miami Dolphins through Houston Texans)Chris Evans5'10 219/RB-Michigan293/4th RoundSmooth. Deceptive. Capable of stopping his charge to plant laterally when the ball has been cupped by the defense.
Evans catches the ball, does not have a lot of mileage on his tires and fumbled just four times in school. Can he beat out Samaje Perine or Trayveon Willliams for the backup spot?
235th overallCincinnati Bengals (from Detroit Lions through Seattle Seahawks)Wyatt Hubert6'2 265/DE-OLB-Kansas State186/3rd RoundAthletic bloodlines. Has some dawg in him. Will talk noise to the opponent. Instinctive. Plays at one speed. Positive knee bender. Spins back to regain contain if he loses it initially. Finished his career with 20 QB sacks and 33 TFLs. Can he earn the third or fourth pass rusher’s role in Cincinnati?
Cleveland Browns
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
26th overallCleveland BrownsGreg Newsome II6'1 190/CB-Northwestern64/2nd RoundNewsome’s technique goes along with smooth on-field movement. The Browns now have three cornerbacks to match up with the AFC’s fast-paced offenses.
52nd overallCleveland Browns (from Chicago Bears)Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah6’1 220/LB-Notre Dame24/2nd RoundOwusu-Koramoah plays the game as if blockers aren’t on the field. His skill at triggering allowed him to overcome some lower body stiffness. We thought he was the best special teams player we saw on film (see Georgia ‘19).
91st overallCleveland BrownsAnthony Schwartz6’0 186/WR-Auburn297/4th RoundSchwartz displayed all of the foot speed (4.28) and flashes to get NFL teams excited if they project him as a gadget-type prospect. We think he can be used in fly motion on speed sweeps, speed shovel passes and even on end-arounds. Despite not doing it collegiately, he could be an option as a kickoff returner.
110th overallCleveland Browns (from Philadelphia Eagles)James Hudson6'4 313/OT-Cincinnati80/3rd RoundIn 2020, the first-team All-AAC selection performed like a seasoned veteran. He displayed easy feet in pass protection, aggressiveness as a run blocker and positive down-to-down intensity. The former Michigan Wolverine is somewhat over-aggressive in some of his movements, but he naturally compensates with quickness winning to the spot.
132nd overallCleveland BrownsTommy Togiai6’2 300/DT-Ohio State362/5th RoundMaintaining his original gap control was something he did with far more consistency as a junior, but are there still some questions about his overall anticipation of blocking schemes. It seemed as if he made a decision in 2020 to sit down and play with increased torque.
153rd overallCleveland Browns (via Detroit Lions)Tony Fields II6’1 222/LB-West Virginia, Arizona306/4th RoundDurable. Started all 47 games of his college career at two different stops. Lines up all over the field as an edge rusher, ILB and OLB. Communicates to line up defensive personnel in the pre-snap. Instinctive. Fields II has to be productive on special teams to beat out some of the Browns current linebackers.
169th overallCleveland Browns (from Los Angeles Rams)Richard LeCounte III5’11 190/S-Georgia151/3rd RoundIt has been slightly hit-or-miss -literally- for LeCounte III as a tackler in the film viewed. We do, however, think it is an area he improved in 2020. There are some instances (see Notre Dame ‘19, 4th QTR; Kentucky ‘20) where he wraps with the correct intent. A midseason motorcycle accident hurt his charge. LeCounte III adds depth in the team’s safety room and will compete for the third or fourth safety spot.
211th overallCleveland BrownsDemetric Felton5’9 184/All-Purpose-UCLA207/4th RoundBall security. Fumbled just twice in 358 combined touches in school. Former WR with excellent toughness running in-between the tackles as a dot RB. Carries his pads well.
His meal ticket in the NFL will be as an all-purpose performer. The key for the All-Pac-12 performer is to have his game day field speed from college translate to the NFL. Can he beat out D’Ernest Johnson for the kickoff return role?
Pittsburgh Steelers
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPositionSchoolNotes
24th overallPittsburgh SteelersNajee Harris6’1 231 RB-Alabama11/1st RoundThe Steelers get the former five-star recruit whose game continues to grow, both as a receiver and blocker. They get one of the better prospects in the 2021 NFL Draft.
55th overallPittsburgh SteelersPat Freiermuth6’5 251 TE-Penn State85/3rd RoundFreiermuth, the 2020 Big Ten Tight End of the Year, earned the honor despite missing over half of the year due to a shoulder injury. Prior to that, he averaged nearly six catches and 78 receiving yards per game.
87th overallPittsburgh SteelersKendrick Green6'2 305/OL-Illinois48/2nd RoundGreen is one of the top interior offensive lineman available in this year’s class due to his combination of speed and pad level. The All-Big Ten guard excels with a low and balanced approach; particularly on combination blocks. He exhibits a level of savvy to cut-off backside defenders on run action away.
128th overallPittsburgh SteelersDan Moore, Jr.6’5 309/OT-Texas A&M148/3rd RoundMoore did not have to be an outstanding technician in school. He was a good enough as an athlete to get away with setting short corners. He often used his width to widen defensive ends over the top of the pocket. Now with that said, we felt he played much better in 2020 than he had in 2019, where he was inconsistent in the film viewed.
140th overallPittsburgh Steelers (compensatory selection)Buddy Johnson6’0 228/LB-Texas A&M71/2nd RoundThe former high school quarterback is a natural leader with very good football awareness and instincts. He usually offers up one highlight film worthy hit per game in inside-out pursuit or in the box.
156th overallPittsburgh Steelers (from Miami Dolphins via Dallas Cowboys through Philadelphia Eagles)Isaiahh Loudermilk6’6 274/DE-Wisconsin325/4th RoundIn sub-packages, he may be able to provide an occasional change-up by working at a zero-technique because his width can make the pocket cloudy for the quarterback. The 6-foot-6 defensive lineman uses his prep level All-State basketball skills to bat passes as well as anyone in this year’s draft (nine career pass deflections).
216th overallPittsburgh Steelers (from Tampa Bay Buccaneers)Quincy Roche6’2 238/DE-OLB-Miami (Fla.), Temple128/3rd RoundThere may be some questions about Roche’s size, but his activity should not be underestimated. Keep in mind that this is a prospect with 54 career tackles for loss to go along with 30.5 sacks, eight forced fumbles and three blocked kicks.
245th overallPittsburgh Steelers (from Miami Dolphins)Tre Norwood6’0 189/DB-Oklahoma360/5th RoundNorwood is a hard-working player who concentrates on his technique and attempts to be where he is supposed to be down-to-down. There is a level of detail in his play that is commendable. The big question comes down to how NFL teams view his upside. Is he quick enough to be a full-time nickel? Does he have the necessary bulk to move inside to free safety full-time?
254th overallPittsburgh Steelers (from Baltimore Ravens)Pressley Harvin III5’11 263/P-Georgia Tech215/4th RoundWhat a year it was for Harvin III. He made history by becoming the first African American to win the Ray Guy Award and it was not even close. Consider this. Harvin III’s 44-yard net punting average as a senior would have been tied for fifth with Buffalo Bills punter Corey Bojorquez in the NFL. The accomplished musician’s touch on pooch punts is equally impressive, mainly due to his superb ability to execute drop punts. He’ll compete with Jordan Berry for a roster spot.

2021 NFL Free Agency, Live Updates: AFC North

The Ravens finally signed a wide receiver late in the process, inking a deal with former Chiefs wideout Sammy Watkins. Earlier in the free agency process, the Browns inked a deal with one of the league’s best safeties in former Rams standout John Johnson III. Find out what else has happened in the AFC North this offseason.

AFC North

Baltimore Ravens

Offensive free agents

WR Willie Snead

RB Mark Ingram (Agreed to terms with Texans)

C Matt Skura (Agreed to terms with Dolphins)

QB Robert Griffin III

WR Chris Moore (Agreed to terms with Texans)

RG D.J. Fluker

WR Dez Bryant

WR De’Anthony Thomas

TE Eric Tomlinson (Re-signed)

WR DeAndrew White

RB Gus Edwards (Placed a second-round tender)

C Trystan Colon-Castillo (Re-signed)

WR Antoine Wesley

Defensive free agents

DE Matt Judon (Agreed to terms with Patriots)

DE Yannick Ngakoue (Agreed to terms with Raiders)

DT Derek Wolfe (Re-signed)

S Anthony Levine

DE Tyus Bowser (Re-signed)

DE Pernell McPhee (Re-signed)

CB Tramon Williams

DT Justin Ellis (Re-signed)

DT Jihad Ward (Agreed to terms with Jaguars)

S Jordan Richards (Re-signed)

CB Davontae Harris (Re-signed)

CB Khalil Dorsey (Re-signed)

LB Kristian Welch (Re-signed)

LB L.J. Fort

LB Chris Board (Re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Re-signed TE Nick Boyle to a two-year extension, OLB Tyus Bowser to a four-year deal, OLB Pernell McPhee, DE Derek Wolfe on a four-year deal, LB Chris Board, DT Justin Ellis, CB Khalil Dorsey, LB Kristian Welch, C Trystan Colon-Castillo, TE Eric Tomlinson, CB Davontae Harris, S Jordan Richards
  • Agreed to terms with OG Kevin Zeitler (Giants), WR Sammy Watkins (Chiefs), C Greg Mancz (Texans), CB Chris Westry (Cowboys),
  • Lost OLB Matt Judon (Patriots), DT Jihad Ward (Jaguars), WR Chris Moore (Texans), C Matt Skura (Dolphins)
  • Released RB Mark Ingram (Texans) and did not pick up the contract option on LB L.J. Fort
  • Placed a second-round tender on RB Gus Edwards
  • Traded a conditional draft pick to the Jacksonville Jaguars for TE Josh Oliver

Cleveland Browns

Offensive free agents

LT Kendall Lamm (Agreed to terms with the Titans)

WR JoJo Natson (Re-signed)

WR Rashard Higgins (Re-signed)

WR Taywan Taylor

LG Anthony Fabiano

WR KhaDarel Hodge (Re-signed)

WR Marvin Hall

RG Malcolm Pridgeon

TE Stephen Carlson (Re-signed)

TE Jordan Franks (Re-signed)

Defensive free agents

DE Olivier Vernon

CB Kevin Johnson (Agreed to terms with Titans)

CB Terrance Mitchell (Agreed to terms with Texans)

DE Adrian Clayborn

S Karl Joseph

LB B.J. Goodson

S Andrew Sendejo

LB Malcolm Smith (Re-signed)

DT Larry Ogunjobi (Agreed to terms with Bengals)

S Tedric Thompson

LB Elijah Lee (Re-signed)

CB Robert Jackson (Re-signed)

CB Brian Allen

DT Vincent Taylor (Agreed to terms with the Texans)

DE George Obinna

LB Tae Davis (Agreed to terms with Texans)

CB Tavierre Thomas (Agreed to terms with Texans)

DE Porter Gustin (Re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with S John Johnson (Rams) on a three-year deal, DE Takk McKinley (Raiders) on a one-year deal, CB Troy Hill (Rams), LT Greg Senat (Cowboys), LB Anthony Walker, Jr. (Colts), DT Malik Jackson (Eagles)
  • Lost CB Terrance Mitchell (Texans), DT Vincent Taylor (Browns), LT Kendall Lamm (Titans), CB Tavierre Thomas (Texans), LB Tae Davis (Texans), DT Larry Ogunjobi (Bengals), CB Kevin Johnson (Titans)
  • Re-signed CB Robert Jackson, WR KhaDarel Hodge, TE Stephen Carlson, DE Porter Gustin, TE Jordan Franks, LB Malcolm Smith, WR JoJo Natson, WR Rashard Higgins, K Cody Parkey, LB Elijah Lee

Cincinnati Bengals

Offensive free agents

WR A.J. Green (Agreed to terms with the Cardinals)

WR John Ross (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

C B.J. Finney (Agreed to terms with the Steelers)

TE Cethan Carter (Agreed to terms with the Dolphins)

WR Alex Erickson

LG Quinton Spain

WR Mike Thomas (Re-signed)

QB Brandon Allen (Re-signed)

RG Alex Redmond

RB Samaje Perine (Re-signed)

Defensive free agents

S Shawn Williams

CB Mackensie Alexander

CB William Jackson III (Agreed to terms with the WFT)

S Brandon Wilson (Re-signed)

CB LeShaun Sims

LB Josh Bynes

DT Christian Covington

DT Mike Daniels

DT Margus Hunt

DT Xavier Williams

DE Carl Lawson (Agreed to terms with the Jets)

CB Jalen Davis (Re-signed)

CB Tony Brown (Re-signed)

LB Jordan Evans

DT Amani Bledsoe

CB Torry McTyer (Agreed to terms with the WFT)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with DE Trey Hendrickson (Saints) on a four-year deal, CB Chidobe Awuzie (Cowboys) on a three-year deal, CB Mike Hilton (Steelers) on a four-year deal, DT Larry Ogunjobi (Browns), LT Riley Reiff (Vikings), FS Ricardo Allen (Falcons)
  • Re-signed CB Jalen Davis, WR Mike Thomas, QB Brandon Allen, RB Samaje Perine, CB Tony Brown, S Brandon Wilson
  • Lost WR A.J. Green (Cardinals), DE Carl Lawson (Jets), CB William Jackson III (WFT), TE Cethan Carter (Dolphins), CB Torry McTyer (WFT), OL B.J. Finney (Steelers), WR John Ross (Giants), K Randy Bullock (Lions)
  • Released DT Geno Atkins

Pittsburgh Steelers

Offensive free agents

C Maurkice Pouncey (Retired)

LT Alejandro Villanueva

RT Matt Feiler (Agreed to terms with the Chargers)

RT Zach Banner (Re-signed)

WR JuJu Smith-Schuster (Re-signed)

RG Danny Isidora

TE Trey Edmunds (Re-signed)

RB James Conner

RT Jerald Hawkins

WR Ray-Ray McCloud (Re-signed)

QB Joshua Dobbs

C J.C. Hassenauer (Re-signed)

LT Jarron Jones (Re-signed)

Defensive free agents

OLB Bud Dupree (Agreed to terms with Titans)

LB Avery Williamson

CB Mike Hilton (Agreed to terms with Bengals)

DT Tyson Alualu (Agreed to terms with Jaguars)

DE Cassius Marsh

DE Jayrone Elliott

DT Chris Wormley (Re-signed)

S Jordan Dangerfield

S Sean Davis

CB Cameron Sutton (Re-signed)

LB Tegray Scales (Re-signed)

LB Marcus Allen (Re-signed)

LB Olasunkanmi Adeniyi (Agreed to terms with Titans)

LB Robert Spillane (Re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Restructured the contract of QB Ben Roethlisberger
  • Re-signed CB Cameron Sutton, RT Zach Banner, TE Trey Edmunds, WR Ray-Ray McCloud, LB Tegray Scales, LB Marcus Allen, C J.C. Hassenauer, LB Robert Spillane, OT Jarron Jones, DT Chris Wormley, WR JuJu Smith-Schuster
  • Agreed to terms with OC B.J. Finney (Bengals), S Miles Killebrew (Lions), T Joe Haeg (Buccaneers)
  • Released LB Vince Williams, CB Steven Nelson
  • Lost DT Tyson Alualu (Jaguars), CB Mike Hilton (Bengals), OLB Bud Dupree (Titans), OC Maurkice Pouncey (retired), OL Matt Feiler (Chargers), LB Olasunkanmi Adeniyi (Titans)

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC North

Baltimore Ravens  Notable picks: The Ravens went LB twice in its first five picks. It is a position that they plan to revamp with Queen and Harrison. Harrison relied on his natural instincts in school and Queen outran any poor reads. Both players have to develop quickly for the team to come close to its 2019 success in 2020.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (28) Patrick Queen6’1 229
LB/LSU
90/3rd Round Despite being just a one-year starter, the Ravens are banking on Queen’s foot speed to outrun any rookie mistakes.
2 (55) J.K. Dobbins5’9 209
RB/Ohio State
45/2nd Round This was an interesting selection. Sure it looks good to have another RB in the mix, but where does his insertion into the rotation leave Gus Edwards (back-to-back 700-yard campaigns) and Justice Hill (2019 4th -round pick).
3 (71) Justin Madubuike6’3 293
DT/Texas A&M
30/2nd Round For a DT with just 9-inch hands, Madubuike certainly overpowered a number of OL in school. His biggest weakness actually revolves around hand placement. He was flagged for four facemask penalties in 2018.
3 (92)Devin Duvernay5’10 202
WR/Texas
/3rd Round Duvernay’s breakout 2019 season featured increased understanding of the position. He has flashed as an outside receiver as well. If he can begin to use his strength more on the outside lanes, there are possibilities for multiple roles.
3 (98)Malik Harrison6’3 247
LB/Ohio State
18/2nd Round Harrison fits more of the 1980s profile for exchange LBs. His eyes have often taken him where he needs to get but he left some plays on the field. His coverage capability will either make him a starter or solid backup.
3 (106) Tyre Phillips6’5 331
OG/Mississippi State
273 /4th Round
The collegiate left tackle more than held his own as the Bulldogs blindside protector in 2019. During the postseason, he displayed starting capability as a guard. Either way, his presence (84 5/8-inch wingspan) gives the Ravens one of the bigger offensive lines in the league.
4 (143)Ben Bredeson6’5 310
OG/Michigan
125/3rd RoundBredeson plays balanced and completes a large majority of his assignments. His latch needs to improve when sustaining blocks. Bredeson was the rare junior team captain in the Jim Harbaugh-era at Michigan.
5 (170)
Broderick Washington
6’3 305
DT/Texas Tech
374/5th Round
Washington has enough quickness to play the four-technique in three-man fronts, three-technique in four-man fronts and occasional one-technique DT. He is heavy-handed and durable (37 straight starts to end career).


Baltimore Ravens third-round pick Tyre Phillips (seen pictured in the 2019 Music City Bowl) starred at the LT spot in college for the Bulldogs. The Ravens could possibly use him at guard, where he played well in the postseason all-star circuit.
6 (201) James Proche  5’11 201
WR/SMU
119/3rd Round
Proche caught 301 passes for 3,949 yards for an eye-popping 39 TDs in school. He excelled at making the acrobatic catch in school but also has outstanding strength (20 reps-225 lbs.).
7 (219) Geno Stone 5’10 207
S/Iowa
266/4th RoundThe junior-entry has enough instincts to play a nickel linebacker spot in school. He carries a number of similarities to former Tennessee Titans fourth-round pick Amani Hooker in terms of size, responsibility in school and play speed. He will have to make an impact on special teams to make the final roster.
Cincinnati Bengals  Notable pick:  The Bengals have a number of weapons available at Burrow’s disposal. The most important -RB Joe Mixon- can serve the role of Burrow’s Clyde Edwards-Helaire at LSU. Burrow may just be the QB to take advantage of Mixon’s skill-set.
Round, Selection,
Player Position/School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1)Joe Burrow6’3 221
QB-LSU
15/2nd Round Burrow’s quick decision-making will be asked to ramp up early in a division that may be competitive down to the last week of the season. He excelled in spread sets as a senior and expect the Bengals to incorporate plenty of those concepts.
2 (33) Tee Higgins 6’4 216
WR-Clemson
33/2nd Round A.J. Green’s long-term prospects with the team is uncertain. Higgins’ long arms and deceptive running style carry similarities to Green’s and the two would be a viable pair to complement John Ross and Tyler Boyd.
3 (65) Logan Wilson6’2 241
LB-Wyoming
27/2nd Round Wilson -a former star high school DB- recorded 10 interceptions in college and was a magnet chasing plays down sideways. If he can improve his initial footwork, he should be able to compete early in an underrated LB corps.
4 (107) Akeem Davis-Gaither6’2 224
LB-Appalachian State
85/2nd Round It could be argued that Davis-Gaither fits the LB room as good -if not better- than Wilson. He was one of the more impressive LBs during the postseason and his on-field range stands out week-to-week.
5 (147)Khalid Kareem 6’4 268 OLB/DE-Notre Dame172/4th Round Kareem is a power rusher with positive awareness to affect the passing game once his rush has been stopped. He has experience rushing from a four-point, three-point or two-point stance.
6 (180)
Hakeem Adeniji
6’4 302
OG/OT-Kansas
89/3rd RoundOne of the most durable OL in the draft, Adeniji made starts at LG, RT and LT in school. He needs to improve versus line games, but exhibited quickness and explosiveness in school.
7 (215)
Marcus Bailey
6’1 235
LB-Purdue
309/5th Round
If not for durability concerns during his career, Bailey would likely have gone much higher in the draft. He finished his career with 327 tackles and 28 TFLs.
Cincinnati Bengals sixth-round pick Hakeem Adeniji started 48 straight games for Kansas during his career.
Cleveland Browns   Notable pick:  The team has been looking for a consistent left tackle it seems since Baker Mayfield entered the lineup. Although Wills, Jr. protected the blindside for Tua Tagovailoa, it was from the right side. How he adjusts to the other side will determine the Browns success in 2020.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (10) Jedrick Wills, Jr. 6’4 312
OT-Alabama
3/1st RoundWills, Jr. continued to improve what was already satisfactory hand placement in 2019. The penalties were a problem. For a team that had its issues with those in 2019, it must be something they address with him early in the season.
2 (44) Grant Delpit6’2 213
S-LSU
50/2nd Round Perhaps no prospect was as mystifying as Delpit. The 2019 Jim Thorpe Award winner missed so many tackles during his award-winning year that injuries were given as part of the problem. Either way, he will have to make the one-on-one tackles in a bruising division. If he can live up to the task, then his athleticism should shine getting off of the hash marks.
3 (88) Jordan Elliott6’4 302
DT-Missouri
121/3rd Round Elliott was probably most effective when the team clearly defined his responsibilities. He is a positional-flex candidate with quickness and a slippery nature.
3 (97) Jacob Phillips6’3 229
LB-LSU
160/3rd Round He can slide effectively for a taller LB and actually sink to tackle. Phillips does take an extra step or two to get in-and-out of transition. As he grows into his role for the team, making positive weight gains could help his cause.
4 (115)Harrison Bryant 6’5 243
TE-FAU
114 /3rd Round Bryant went to a team that may use him in two TE sets quite a bit of the time. With David Njoku’s injury history a subject of concern, Bryant may get an opportunity sooner than later.
5 (160) Nick Harris6’1 302
OC-Washington
166/3rd Round Harris will get the opportunity to become the team’s eighth OL on game day with the new NFL rules allowing for two more OL to suit up on game day. His mobility could add layers to the Browns offense.
6 (187)Donovan Peoples-Jones6’2 212
All-purpose-Michigan
168/4th Round The former Michigan Gatorade Player of the Year was an underrated punt returner in school and routinely made some spectacular adjustments on difficult catches. Rounding out his consistency could give him a chance to make the team.
Cleveland Browns first-round pick Jedrick Wills, Jr. frequently handled the blindside protection for Alabama QB Tua Tagovailoa.
Pittsburgh Steelers  Notable picks:  McFarland may seem like a pick to simply add a different element, but if 2018 is any indication, he could steal valuable playing time from a number of quality RBs in front of him on the depth chart.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (49)Chase Claypool 6’4 238
All-purpose/
Notre Dame
23/2nd Round We were trying to find a way to put into perspective the number of special teams plays Claypool made while at Notre Dame (25 tackles). But those plays only amplify some of his high-wire body control full extension grabs. He gets stronger as the season progresses.
3 (102)Alex Highsmith
6’3 247
OLB-Charlotte
170/4th RoundConsistent three-year starter with non-stop energy. He reacts well to counter OTs, but his tendency to leave his feet as a pass rusher is something the team may look to adjust early in training camp.
4 (124)Anthony McFarland 5’8 208
B-Maryland
120/3rd RoundMcFarland’s home run gear will add a jolt to the Steelers offense not seen since the days of Willie Parker.
4 (135)Kevin Dotson6’4 310
OG-Louisiana Lafayette
178/4th Round
Standing 6-foot-4 with 10 1/2-inch hands, Dotson does not have a lot of bulk in the lower body. Instead, he wins with solid hat-and-hand placement on a down-to-down basis. His length gives him a chance to keep pass rushers at bay on the interior.
6 (198)
Antoine Brooks 5’11 220
S/LB-Maryland
77/2nd Round
There’s not much Maryland did on the football field defensively without Brooks in mind. Over the course of his stay in school, he was used at LB, nickel, safety and on the punt team. Brooks contains an outstanding feel for working through tight spaces to make tackles.

7 (232)

Carlos Davis
6’2 314
DT-Nebraska
237/4th Round
The two-sport athlete was a second-team All-American in the discus. On the football field, he is an effective two-gap defender who needs to improve his balance.
Pittsburgh Steelers second-round pick Chase Claypool averaged 15.7 yards per reception with 13 TDs for Notre Dame in 2019.

2019 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: AFC North

Ferguson, pictured, totaled 26 tackles for losses in 2018 while also posting 17 quarterback sacks. He ended his career as the FBS’ all-time sack leader.

 

Baltimore Ravens Notable picks: First-year GM Eric DeCosta did a very good job of adding layers to the Baltimore offense.  Brown’s challenge will be to hold his weight at the 175-pound mark while not losing his decisive speed.  Ferguson has more pressure to produce than most third-rounders because of the loss of Terrell Suggs in free agency. Boykin will compete with holdovers Jaleel Scott, Chris Moore, and Jordan Lasley for playing time.  Powers helps improve the depth of the interior line.  Will Marshall move to safety?  The addition of Hill provides the team with a home run threat at the running back position.  He will, however, have to fight for playing time.
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (25)

Acquired this pick from the Philadelphia Eagles for its 22nd overall pick

Marquise Brown WR/

Oklahoma

77/2nd Round Brown has a chance to become dynamic in the Ravens offense in a different type of way than he was at Oklahoma.  Expect to see him used on fly sweeps, seam routes, shallow crossers, nine routes and post patterns.  Will he be a fit with fellow Florida native Lamar Jackson? Physical cornerbacks have competed well against him in the past.
3 (85) Jaylon

Ferguson

DE/

Louisiana Tech

20/2nd Round After a subpar postseason, Ferguson saw his stock slide despite breaking former Ravens’ OLB Terrell Suggs’ all-time NCAA sack record.  Ferguson plays even longer than his size would indicate and he may have to bully tackles early on.  He has a 10-yard burst.
3 (93) Miles Boykin WR/Notre Dame 48/2nd Round Boykin is an upside pick after just one year of high-level production, but he did draw as many pass interference calls as any receiver in this year’s draft.  Can he build on his breakout final year in school?
4 (113)

Acquired from Minnesota

Justice Hill RB/

Oklahoma State

55/2nd Round Hill has the burst to slip-and-slide in-between the tackles on gut runs.  His 4.4 speed is aided by an underrated ability to at least compete in pass protection. 
4 (123) Ben Powers OG/

Oklahoma

136/3rd Round If Powers can sustain blocks with more efficiency, then his ability to gain position can be effective in the NFL.  He excels with hand placement initially and passes off line games well.  His experience gives the team comfort he can translate to the next level.
4 (127)

Acquired from Philadelphia

Iman

Marshall

DB/USC 120/3rd Round It is hard to find cornerbacks who have started 48 games in school.  The Ravens found Marshall, who is physical enough to perhaps transition to the safety spot.  In a crowded cornerback room, he may be asked to shift to the safety spot in nickel/dime packages.
5 (160) Daylon Mack DT/Texas A&M 185/3rd Round The former five-star recruit’s big knock didn’t revolve around power or explosion at 330-plus pounds.  It basically comes down to endurance.  We think he can give the team a solid 20 snaps a game if needed and those snaps can be impactful. 
6 (197) Trace

McSorley

QB/Penn State 101/3rd Round We felt McSorley was one of the better quarterbacks in this year’s draft, but his final year at Penn State included a knee injury that affected his accuracy.  While most expect him to play a variety of roles for the team, we think he can be productive under center in at least a backup capacity.

 

Finley’s experience includes stints at two different schools. He led the ACC in completion percentage (67.4%) in 2018.

Cincinnati Bengals Notable picks: The Bengals were fixated on finding more competition along its offensive line and Williams will be asked to move back to his original spot in college, right tackle.  Sample is underrated as a receiver, but his true value comes as a blocker for a team intent on running the ball effectively.  Pratt’s foot speed will give him an opportunity to compete for a spot in DC Lou Anarumo’s schemes. Can Finley’s experience and maturity actually challenge Andy Dalton?
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (11) Jonah Williams OT/Alabama 46/2nd Round Williams’ experience includes starts at both the right and left tackle spots.  He is an outstanding run blocker with positive bend and mobility.  After whiffing on a number of outside tackles in prior drafts, the Bengals hope to strike gold with the former ‘Tide stalwart.
2 (52) Drew

Sample

TE/

Washington

277/4th Round Sample amplified his draft stock when he ran in the low 4.7-range at 255 pounds.  He is getting better at the little things when it comes to running routes (sinking his weight, using his size, etc..).  He can play multiple spots. 
3 (72) Germaine Pratt LB/North Carolina State 223/4th Round If Pratt -a former safety- can improve his stack-and-shed, we think he can compete early for a spot.  He has had some shoulder issues in the past, but is a fine blitz threat with good ball skills to finish interception opportunities.
4 (103) Ryan Finley QB/NC State 64/2nd Round Finley’s accurate and flexible nature is demonstrated with a quick release when his feet stay quiet in the pocket.  His playing style could fit well in Zac Taylor’s offensive schemes.
4 (125)

Acquired from Denver via Houston

Renell Wren DT/Arizona State 280/4th Round Wren played his best football late in his career but was quietly productive over a two-year stretch.  He gives the teams options in terms of moving their defensive fronts. 
4 (136)

Compensatory pick acquired via Dallas

Michael

Jordan

OG/Ohio State 131/3rd Round Jordan will get the opportunity to move back to the guard spot and play alongside former Buckeye teammate and Bengals center Billy Price.  It could prove to be a winning combination for the Bengals.
6 (182) Trayveon Williams RB/

Texas A&M

71/2nd Round It is hard to find players who rush for over 1,700 yards available in the sixth round, but there were questions surrounding Williams’ true change of direction after ordinary postseason workouts.  A closer look reveals a back capable of slipping in-and-out of tight quarters with burst and power packed into a 206-pound frame.
6 (210) Deshaun Davis LB/Auburn 150/3rd Round Davis is an instinctive linebacker who fits, wraps and seeks to inflict pain on opponents.  He got knocked for a bit of stiffness in pass coverage.  He finished his career with 266 tackles and 29 tackles for losses. 
6 (211) Rodney

Anderson

RB/

Oklahoma

246/4th Round Anderson’s talent has never been in question, but his injury history is concerning.  He is a pick that could reap major rewards if he is able to stay unscathed over the next year and a half.  The former Sooner has soft hands and is good in pass protection. 
7 (223) Jordan Brown CB/South Dakota State 90/3rd Round For the team to pick up one of the draft’s better cornerbacks in terms of size and footwork is a potential heist.  Brown, an FCS All-American, trusts his instincts, tackles well enough and may be able to play multiple spots on the backend. 

Redwine (No. 22 pictured), a former cornerback, impressed teams with 4.44 speed, a 39-inch vertical jump, 10-foot-10-inch broad jump and 4.14 20-yard short shuttle at the 2019 NFL Combine.

Cleveland Browns  Notable picks: Williams and Takitaki both have question marks surrounding different aspects of their games.  Redwine has a load of talent and the former cornerback should be able to operate effectively in man coverage versus tight ends.  Mack Wilson’s eye control will determine his ultimate place on the roster, but his kickoff coverage ability will be a bonus while he develops.  An uncertain kicking situation led to the pick of Seibert, who hasn’t had a number of pressure-packed kicks on his resume’.  Forbes’ selection indicates the team is still looking for competition on the flanks of its offensive line. 
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (46) Greedy Williams CB/LSU 45/2nd Round Williams has to play more physical to survive in a division that prides itself on that style of play.  His cover skills, short memory and outstanding ball skills give him an opportunity to earn playing time opposite Denzel Ward.
3 (80) Sione Takitaki LB/BYU 191/3rd Round Although his space tackling is an issue, he did improve in pass coverage slightly as a senior.  The Browns linebacker corps features a ton of speed, hard hitters and undervalued prospects coming out of the college ranks.  Takitaki fits the bill, but his discipline in pass coverage will ultimately determine whether he can find a role.
4 (119) Sheldrick

Redwine

S/Miami (Fla.) 196/4th Round The former CB has the hip flexibility to cover most tight ends and occasionally matches up with slot WRs effectively (UNC ’18).  His skill-set is very similar to current Browns safety Damarious Randall. 
5 (155) Mack Wilson LB/Alabama 42/2nd Round Despite starring in pass coverage in 2017, Wilson’s inconsistent eye control caused a precipitous fall on draft weekend.  His pad level needs to improve stacking-and-shedding OL (see SEC Champ ’18).  We think he is one of the best kickoff cover guys in the entire 2019 NFL Draft class.
5 (170)

Acquired from New England

Austin Seibert PK/

Oklahoma

596/6th Round Seibert carries a slight right-to-left drift on some of his shorter field goals in the NFL’s extra point range (33-yd GW FG miss, Army ’18).  In addition, he has left some returnable kickoff opportunities for opponents (TCU ’18).  On the plus side, he connected on 80-percent of his career field goal attempts, has range up to about 60 yards and can even be an effective punter in a pinch.  He placed 65 punts inside the 20-yard line during school. 
6 (189) Drew Forbes OG/

SE Missouri State

N/A Forbes ran in the 4.9-range, pumped out 28 reps at 225 pounds, and posted a 30 1/2-inch vertical jump on his Pro Day.  His footwork may give him an opportunity to play the tackle spot, the position he played at in school. 
7 (221)

Acquired from

Jacksonville

Donnie Lewis CB-Nickel/Tulane 158/3rd Round Lewis was one of the more active cornerbacks in the AAC over the last two seasons.  He routinely challenged WRs in man coverage. Postseason injury issues caused him to fall in the draft. He also has experience covering in the slot.

Snell, the Steelers fourth-round selection, was a major factor for Kentucky in the fourth quarters of games. His style fits the personality of the AFC North.

Pittsburgh Steelers Notable picks: GM Kevin Colbert and his scouting department apparently came into this draft looking to increase the team’s speed at the linebacker spot and on special teams.  Bush, Gilbert and Smith go a long way towards reaching that goal. For the second straight year, the team drafted an Alabama defensive lineman on Day 3 of the draft process.  Justin Layne adds a long corner to a group really devoid of size on the edges.  If Johnson can duplicate former WR Antonio Brown’s younger years as a punt return specialist, it could amplify his role within the offense. 
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (20)

Acquired in a trade from the Denver Broncos that sent them the 20th overall pick in the first round

Devin Bush LB/Michigan 11/1st Round Bush, our top-ranked linebacker, brings 4.43 speed and plenty of explosion to the Steelers defense.  The Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year’s mentality brings a tone-setting edge to the team’s defense. 
3 (66)

Acquired from Oakland

Diontae

Johnson

All-Purpose/Toledo 189/3rd Round Johnson’s instant nature gives the team the hope that they may have found yet another gem from the MAC.  We think he offers major upside in the return game.  The 2018 MAC Special Teams Player of the Year averaged 18.5 yards per punt return as a junior and 20.2 yards per punt return in his career (2 TDs).  He also returned two kickoffs for scores while in school. 
3 (83) Justin Layne CB/Michigan State 53/2nd Round Layne is a smooth bail-and-run corner with decent fluidity.  The former WR got better as his career went along, but his sense of urgency has to improve when playing off of wideouts.
4 (122) Benny Snell RB/

Kentucky

146/3rd Round The fourth quarter finisher will compete with James Connor to finish off games. Snell’s attitude and energetic style will be a complement to the team’s running back by committee-approach.  He finished his career with 48 touchdowns. Controlling his emotions will be a big key. 
5 (141)

Acquired from Oakland

Zach Gentry TE/Michigan 448/5th Round The former New Mexico high school four-star QB recruit didn’t develop into a prized signal-caller, but he did become one of the best tight ends in the Big Ten working from the inside-out on pass patterns. Ordinary workouts likely caused a bit of a slide, but he averaged 16.1 yards per reception for the Wolverines in 2018. 
6 (175)

Acquired from Oakland

Sutton Smith LB/Northern Illinois 143/3rd Round Smith’s impressive work in terms of flexibility gives the team hope that he can develop into an exchange linebacker.  With such a knack for rushing the passer off the edge, the hope for the Steelers is his knack for timing can develop from a number of spots.  He finished his career with 30 QB sacks and 58 tackles for losses in just 39 games. 
6 (192) Isaiah Buggs DL/Alabama 319/4th Round Buggs is an intense two-gap defender who relies on power, but he is actually more efficient with his angles as a pass rusher.  He could line up as a three-technique in some of their fronts or the inside shade defensive end in others.  He has value at this spot in the draft. 
6 (207)

Compensatory pick acquired from Arizona

Ulysees Gilbert LB/Akron 313/4th Round The Zips playmaker finished with 112 tackles in a breakout junior campaign but took a bit of a step back in 2018.  He runs in the high 4.4-to-low 4.5-range and will get plenty of opportunities as a core special teams player. 
7 (219)

Acquired from Tampa Bay

Derwin Gray OT/Maryland 368/5th Round Gray has shown that he can sit in the chair and he often plays with an offensive guard’s demeanor.  He possesses adequate length to remain on the edge, but he has to stay healthy.

DraftNasty spotlights Pittsburgh Steelers LB Devin Bush: Flammable

The 2018 Big Ten’s Defensive Player of the Year was a consensus All-American a year after being named a first-team All-Big Ten selection. He was named a back-to-back Academic All-Big Ten performer. We spotlighted the fact that his leadership within the program was verified when he became just the second non-senior to be elected captain during the Jim Harbaugh-era. His father, Devin, Sr., was a first-round draft pick of the Atlanta Falcons in the 1995 NFL Draft after starring at Florida State.

Q&A with Louisiana Tech OL O’Shea Dugas: Brotherhood

Former Louisiana Tech offensive lineman O’Shea Dugas lined up all over the place for the Bulldogs in what turned out to be a very good career. We sat down with Dugas during the week of 2019 East-West Shrine practices to discuss his game and overall bullying approach to football. He also gives insight into some of his one-on-one battles with the NCAA’s all-time sack leader in teammate Jaylon Ferguson.

DN: The first thing that we wanted to ask you about is when you found out you would be coming down here what was your immediate reaction?
Dugas: Excited. Excited to get to work and show my talents.

Dugas (pictured vs. Texas A&M DT Daylon Mack in the 2019 East-West Shrine practices) often re-corrals his frame once off-balance due to his 37 1/4″ arms and 86 1/2″ wingspan. The first-team All-C-USA offensive lineman blocked for three 1,000-yard rushers in school.

DN: It seems like you’re a player that has very heavy hands, been a multi-year starter. Out here (2019 East-West Shrine practices), you’ve kinda proved to a lot of people -at least thus far this week- that your power is something that people have to contend with. What do you think about how you’ve imposed your will?
Dugas: I mean, it’s part of my game. It’s what I do. I’m trying to show it as much as I can.

DN: When you think about some of the things you wanted to work on coming into your final year, what stood out at the top of the list?
Dugas: My footwork was the number one thing on my list to get better at.

DN: Was it your short-set, your quick-set, maybe getting more vertical? From a technical perspective, what do you think you kind of centered on?
Dugas: More lateral movement. My hands were there but I wasn’t always in position with my feet so that I could use my hands how I want to.

DN: Right. Talk about the success you’ve had the last couple of years winning some bowl games.
Dugas: Unfortunately, I didn’t play in the Hawaii Bowl (2018). But the first three years going to a bowl game, it was an amazing experience. It hurt me that I wasn’t able to go to Hawaii with my team. But everything works out for the best.

DN: Your offense has been one of the more productive offenses in C-USA football. You had a guy in J’Mar (Smith) who kind of came on. How was your relationship with him and Teddy Veal, who’s come on to the program and done some good things, you’ve had a running back that got drafted last year (Boston Scott, 6th Round, 201st overall, 2018 NFL Draft, New Orleans Saints). You’ve had several running backs who’ve been productive, aside from just Boston (Kenneth Dixon, 2016 NFL Draft, 4th Round, 134th overall, Baltimore Ravens). Talk about the success of those guys.
Dugas: It’s not a surprise that those guys had an opportunity to go to the league. For us, it’s a brotherhood. That’s my brother. We love to play with each other and we give everything. I’ll lay my life down for those guys at Louisiana Tech.

DN: In terms of positional versatility, you have the ability to move to either guard spot and you’ve played some tackle. What do you feel like is your best position for the next level?
Dugas: I would say guard would be my best position at the next level. But I can go in-or-out, it doesn’t matter to me.

DN: Well, you have moved around some in school. What would you say is the toughest opponent you’ve gone against? Is there one guy at the end of your career, you’d say he was a dawg?
Dugas: I’m going to have to say my dude J-Ferguson (Jaylon Ferguson, DE-Louisiana Tech). By far, he was one of the best players that I went against.

DN: In terms of competitive streak from both of y’all, what was the one thing you kind of learned from him?
Dugas: How D-ends can switch from speed-to-power. I learned from him the different hand swipes that they do and me putting my hands in the right places.

DN: No doubt. If there is an NFL player you look up to, who would it be?
Dugas: Have to be Trent Williams (Washington Redskins).

DN: Want to thank you for your time and best of luck in this year’s draft.
Dugas: Yes sir, thank you.

DN: Thank you.

Corey Chavous, DraftNasty staff reports, 2019 East-West Shrine practices, Day 1

2019 NFL Draft: Cornering the market

The 2019 NFL Draft has long been lauded for a deep class of interior and exterior defensive linemen. One position -although devoid of Top 10 talent- that has unique depth is the cornerback spot. We take a look at three players from that position group.

Justin Layne 6’2 185 Michigan State

Layne has a smooth style accompanied by defensive end-like arm length (33″). The former college wide receiver posted 30 touchdowns as a prep level star at Benedictine High School (Ohio). For a taller corner, he flips his hips relatively well in man-to-man coverage. We were surprised at his ability to react off of the wide receiver’s block of the safety in crack-and-replace situations to tackle.

The former Spartan needs to monitor allowing his motor-press technique turning into a backpedal at the line of scrimmage. This has allowed easy access on quick slants. On the plus side, however, this same technique keeps him in the hip pocket of receivers. In these instances, he is adept at playing through the hands of wideouts with his back turned to the quarterback in man-to-man coverage (PBU, 4th QTR/5:07, Utah State; PBU, 4th QTR/5:07, Penn State vs. Johnson).

NFL teams hold Layne in relatively high regard and we expect him to possibly come off the board at least by the end of Day 2 next weekend.

Corey Ballentine 5’11 196 Washburn

Ballentine averaged nearly 31 yards per kickoff return as a junior at the Division II level. In 46 career games, he forced four fumbles and displayed a knack for blocking kicks (three in 2018). The first-team All-MIAA performer uses adequate technique in press-man coverage and has shown the ability to close on crossing routes that break away from him. Despite recording just five interceptions in school, he has a natural feel and comfort finding the football due to his footwork, hip flexibility and confident disposition.

Ballenine posted a 10.51 100-meter time for the Washburn track & field squad. The 2018 Cliff Harris Award winner posted an 11’3″ broad jump at the 2019 NFL Combine.

For him to transition from the D2 level to the pros, the 2018 Cliff Harris Award winner will have to concentrate on playing a little bit lower in his stance. This would eliminate him from reacting too dramatically to hard jab steps, which he has a tendency to do on occasion. Teams that have Ballentine in mind will be comforted by the fact that he was a part of the team’s kickoff and punt return units, while also returning the kickoffs referenced earlier. The former Washburn track & field sprinter posted a 21.2-second time in the 200-meters while in school.

Jordan Brown 6’0 201 South Dakota State

We were fortunate to see Brown play in person during the team’s playoff contest against Kennesaw State in December 2018 and we were impressed with his down-to-down awareness. The Jackrabbits team captain is another former wide receiver with the skills to play off-man or bump-and-run.

Brown (pictured pointing) finished his career with 148 tackles, 6 TFLs, 4 FFs, 8 INTs and 27 PBUs. He was a two-time first-team All-MVFC selection and AP third-team All-American in 2018.

The Kennesaw State contest required him to play disciplined football because of the Owls’ diverse triple-option attack. His fourth quarter plant-and-drive on a quick three-step hitch created a tip that was intercepted by a teammate. The turnover sealed the game for the team. He believed his indicators and drove on the football with force. We were not as impressed with his inability to protect his thigh boards in this game, but he has exhibited solid tackling technique on film. Maintaining eye control will be key for Brown in his next level ascension (see Southern Illinois ’18).