Category Archives: NFL

2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl, In-game report, 12-21-21: SDSU vs. 24) UTSA

The 2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl was the first of two bowl games in three days to take place at Toyota Stadium, the home of the FC Dallas Burn. The game pitted two teams that entered the game with a combined total of 23 victories. In a contest that largely lived up to the billing, the Brady Hoke-led Aztecs (12-2) took over the contest in the second half to win 38-24. It was just the second loss for the 24th-ranked Roadrunners (12-2), who have turned into one of the nation’s up-and-coming programs under Texas high school coaching legend and 2021 C-USA Coach of the Year Jeff Traylor.

DraftNasty’s Corey Chavous’ in-game report goes into quarterback Lucas Johnson, who recently entered the transfer portal, along with RB Greg Bell, OG William Dunkle, OT Zachary Thomas, TE Daniel Bellinger, PK/P Matt Araiza and DE Keshawn Banks, among others.

CJ Baskerville celebrating his interception in the 2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl
Baskerville (No. 34 pictured jumping) had nine tackles and one interception to earn Defensive MVP honors in the 2021 Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl.

Chavous discusses who won the highly-anticipated battle between UTSA offensive tackle Spencer Burford and SDSU defensive end Cameron Thomas. In addition, he goes inside the bowl game MVP performances from wide receiver Jesse Matthews and safety CJ Baskerville.

2021 Radiance Technologies Independence Bowl, In-game Report, 12-18-21

The 2021 Radiance Technologies Independence Bowl featured a battle between the 12th-ranked BYU Cougars (10-3) and the UAB Blazers (9-4) in Shreveport, Louisiana on December 18th. DraftNasty’s Corey Chavous breaks down the game’s turning points, the state of both programs and the top pro prospects on each of the teams. In a back-and-forth battle, the Blazers outlasted the Cougars.

The Blazers were led by running back DeWayne McBride (5’11, 215, SOPH), who rushed for 183 yards on 28 carries behind an offensive line featuring LT Kadeem Telfort (6’8, 335, R-JR) and RT Colby Ragland (6’5, 315, R-SR). Chavous breaks down both in the video, along with their star deep threats in tight end Gerrit Prince (6’5, 240, R-SR) and junior wide receiver Trea Shropshire (6’3 195, JR).

UAB redshirt senior tight end Gerrit Prince caught four passes for 43 yards and two touchdowns in the 2021 Radiance Technologies Independence Bowl.

On the other side, BYU had a stalwart of its own in star running back Tyler Allgeier (5’11, 220, R-SOPH). Allgeier finished with 192 tough yards and averaged 7.1 yards per carry. Playing without injured quarterback Jaren Hall (6’1, 205, SOPH), the team turned to the Romneys, Baylor (6’2, 195, SOPH) and Gunner (6’2, 195, JR) to get it done in support. But it was one of BYU’s freshman defenders who stood out. Find out who it was in Corey Chavous’ video in-game report.

Ryan Bowman DL-Senior Washington Huskies

Over the course of Washington Huskies defensive lineman Ryan Bowman’s career, he’s been a versatile, intense playmaker. As his play has proven, average size is only part of his story. The unique combination of savvy and power often allowed him to out-muscle the competition, if you will. We look inside his game in our breakdown on the former Husky and give a sneak preview of our scouting report.

Washington Huskies DL Ryan Bowman (No. 55 pictured on the tackle) often out-worked opponents in school. Some of his opponents in practice were NFL-caliber.

What makes this player NASTY…(Strengths): Football player! Former walk-on who made himself a factor in the Pac-12. Has played LB, DE and OLB. Sudden on line spikes to beat OGs from the RDE spot (four-technique, QBH, 2nd QTR, BYU ’19). Wins on these types of spikes from the stand-up two-point LOLB spot due to quickness (tackle vs. Holani, 4th QTR, Las Vegas Bowl ’19). Sinks his hips and got around the OG vs. BYU in 2019 to force a QB sack (FF, FR-TD). Times snap counts and will crease the backfield (TFL, Colorado ’18). From the OLB spot, he displays some LB-like ability to capture contain vs. speed sweeps to force the ball back inside (2nd QTR, Las Vegas Bowl ’19). Uses spin/roll moves when OTs set high against him to his outside hip (Oregon State ’19). As an interior DL, he spins out of blocks to make tackles inside (UCLA ’18). In these moments, he extends his inside hand as he makes the move. Deft roll moves elude OTs (tackle, third down, 3rd QTR, USC ’19).

Nevada Wolf Pack 2022 NFL Draft: Pros and cons

The Nevada Wolf Pack have a host of NFL prospects in this year’s draft class. Prior to its 2021 Quick Lane Bowl matchup versus the Western Michigan Broncos, we dive into the team’s prospects for the 2022 NFL Draft.

12 Carson Strong 6’4 220 (E) QB-Junior

Nevada junior QB Carson Strong, pictured, completed 70% of his nearly 44 passing attempts per game in 2021.


* Football IQ/Howitzer/Toughness
* Attacks all 53 1/2 yards of the field
* Carson Palmer-type
* Creativity?

7 Romeo Doubs 6’2 200 WR-Senior

* Carries pads/Creates panic for the DB
* Positive deep ball tracker
* Aligns at multiple spots/North-south punt returner
* Concentration lapses


35 Toa Taua 5’10 210 RB-Senior

* Low center of gravity
* Excellent hand-eye coordination (catch vs. Purdue, 4th QTR, 2019)
* Bounces off tacklers
* Ball security (left too many footballs on the turf)

19 Cole Turner 6’6 240 TE/H-back-Senior

* Comfortable working in-between hash marks
* Catch radius/Red Zone threat
* Mike Gesicki-type/Positive space blocker
* In-line blocking question marks/Bulk?

99 Dom Peterson 6’0 295 DL-Senior

Nevada DL Dom Peterson (No. 99 pictured) heads into the team’s bowl game with 42.5 career tackles for losses.

  • Leverage/lateral quickness/productivity (21 career QB sacks)
  • Moves around the front
  • Length? Where will he play?

Frost is one of the better run blocking tackles in the Mountain West Conference.

65 Aaron Frost 6’4 305 RT-Senior

* Nasty/Finish/Tone-setter
* Run blocking prowess
* Can he play center?

95 Tristan Nichols 6’4 245 DE-Junior

* Wheels arm to turn corner/Long-arms opponents
* Special teams upside on the FG block unit
* One-year wonder

11 Daiyan Henley 6’2 225 LB-Senior

* Coverage upside/Ball skills (4 INTs, TD in 2021)
* Improving mirroring in-between the C-gaps
* Inconsistent block destroyer

6 Tyson Williams 5’9 200 S-Senior

* Experienced/Attacks the action/Instinctive
* Takes some gambles in coverage (KSU ’21)
* Size question marks

Bryce Callahan CB-Denver Broncos: DraftNasty Throwback

Current Denver Broncos cornerback Bryce Callahan started his career as a relative unknown in Chicago. Despite going undrafted, Callahan has started 10 or more games in three of the last four seasons. As we learned when we sat down with Callahan years ago, his speed comes from his family lineage. In each of the last three seasons, the former Owl has posted two or more interceptions. After four solid seasons in Chicago, the Bears were forced to make moves in 2019 after he left the Windy City to go Mile High in free agency. We dive back into Callahan’s scouting report from our 2015 NFL Draft Manual.

Bryce Callahan 2015 NFL Scouting report
We look back at our 2015 NFL Draft scouting report on current Denver Broncos defensive back Bryce Callahan.

Darren Waller TE-Las Vegas Raiders: DraftNasty Throwback

When former Georgia Tech wide receiver Darren Waller came out of school in an option-based offense back in 2014, he was largely an afterthought for many NFL teams. This despite standing 6-foot-6, weighing 238 pounds and running in the 4.4-range. After all, he started just 12 games over his last two seasons for the Yellow Jackets. His first few seasons in the NFL as a Baltimore Raven were largely unproductive, but Waller has become one of the NFL’s most versatile tight ends. We revisit our report on Waller from DraftNasty’s 2015 NFL Draft Manual.

Darren Waller 2015 NFL Draft Scouting report
Former Georgia Tech wide receiver Darren Waller, a 2020 Pro Bowl selection for the Las Vegas Raiders, has transformed himself into one of the NFL’s best tight ends.

2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC North

The 2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC North breaks down the selections of all the division teams. The Detroit Lions prioritized the trenches under new HC Dan Campbell. While, the Chicago Bears and Minnesota Vikings look to the future at quarterback with Justin Fields and Kellen Mond. Can Eric Stokes (pictured) help the backend in Green Bay?

Detroit Lions     
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 7th overallDetroit LionsPenei Sewell6’5 331 OT-Oregon3/1st RoundSewell’s nastiness made him one of the best picks in this year’s draft and fits what the Lions are trying to do with a physical running game.
2nd round, 41st overallDetroit LionsLevi Onwuziurike6’3 297 DT-Senior41/2nd RoundDespite not being an elite interior pass rusher, there is room for Onwuzurike to develop into more in that facet of his game.
3rd round, 72nd overallDetroit LionsAlim McNeill6’2 317/DT-NG-NC State72/2nd RoundMcNeill has all of the tools to be a legitimate first and second down force as a zero-technique nose guard. His strength is sudden, particularly after establishing hand placement inside the numbers of centers or guards. The All-ACC defensive tackle can win laterally or to a spot, but there are questions about his ability to finish as a pass rusher.
3rd round, 101st overallDetroit LionsIfeatu Melifonwu6’3 213/CB-Syracuse187/3rd RoundHis tackling was solid for the most part, but he did not attack stalk blocks with a dominant mentality. Overall, Melifonwu played with awareness and attacked the three-step passing game. After a solid Senior Bowl week, he should hear his name called early on Day 3 of the draft process.
4th round, 112th overallDetroit LionsAmon-Ra St. Brown5’11 197/WR-USC21/2nd RoundTraffic. How do prospects play within the high traffic areas on the field? St. Brown attacks traffic as a route runner or blocker.
4th round, 113th overallDetroit Lions (from Carolina Panthers)Derrick Barnes6’0 245/LB-Purdue169/3rd RoundBarnes’ value depends on where a team decides to play him. In 2019, he was more than capable as a rush outside linebacker. We feel the former All-State running back’s feel for the game should be used in a multitude of roles. His experience on special teams helps his overall value.
7th round, 257th overallDetroit Lions (from Cleveland Browns)Jermar Jefferson5’10 206/RB-Oregon State222/4th RoundJefferson is a smooth effortless runner who is light on his feet with good contact balance. He squirts through holes, picks his feet up and uses subtle slide steps that cover distance going laterally.
Minnesota Vikings
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 23rd overallMinnesota Vikings (from New York Jets)Christian Darrisaw6’5 314 LT-Virginia Tech4/1st RoundThe Vikings get one of the draft’s best offensive line talents after sliding back in the first round. Good moves again by the Vikings front office.
3rd round, 66th overallMinnesota Vikings (from New York Jets)Kellen Mond6’3 211/QB-Texas A&M147/3rd RoundOverall, the Aggies’ all-time leader in total offense has a dual-threat game that largely translates to today’s NFL game. To put it all in perspective, he had 18 games with a rushing and passing touchdown in school.
3rd round, 78th overallMinnesota VikingsChazz Surratt6’2 227/LB-North Carolina132/3rd RoundSurratt is a converted QB and has limited reps as a linebacker although he did play safety in high school. The Tar Heels converted QB will be judged by his ability to learn the intricacies of the position, but in a short time he has shown the raw talent is there.
3rd round, 86th overallMinnesota Vikings (from New York Jets)Wyatt Davis6’3 315/OG-Ohio State63/2nd RoundThe Big Ten Offensive Lineman of the Year has paved the way for Ohio State’s running game and likely a spot for himself early in the 2021 NFL Draft. We were probably most impressed with his ability to re-anchor in the pass protection aspect of his game. His ability to play with a base gives him a chance versus some of the quicker leverage-based defensive tackles he will face at the next level.
3rd round, 90th overallMinnesota VikingsPatrick Jones II6’4 268/DE-Pittsburgh97/3rd RoundWe think the first-team All-American’s future in the NFL is as either a right defensive end or 30-front rush outside linebacker. As an outside linebacker, he will be able to operate with a little room to set up his pass rush moves. The former Virginia high school product has a game that blossomed the last two years
after serving an apprenticeship role back in 2018 (23 tackles, 4 QB sacks, 7.5 TFLs, FF).
4th round, 119th overallMinnesota VikingsKene Nwangwu6’0 212/RB-Iowa State171/3rd RoundNwangwu, a former prep level track and field star, has battled injuries while in school. He bounced back positively from an Achilles tendon injury in 2017 to embody what the Iowa State program currently represents from a leadership perspective. Even though he played second-fiddle to first-team All-American Breece Hall, it should not be a reflection of his own diverse talent.
4th round, 125th overallMinnesota Vikings (from Chicago Bears)Camryn Bynum6’0 198/CB-California236/4th RoundThere may be questions about Bynum’s flat-out speed, but we think those may concealed if used in a Vonn Bell-type roll at the next level.
4th round, 134th overallMinnesota Vikings (from Buffalo Bills; conditional)Janarius Robinson6'5 266/DE-FSU134/3rd RoundGames like the Clemson contest in 2019 display the potential of Robinson, who is a big defensive end with very good field speed. We even think he has the upside to potentially play an outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense. His quickness is tough to handle.
5th round, 157th overallMinnesota VikingsIhmir Smith-Marsette6'0 181/WR-Iowa146/3rd RoundHis foot speed is probably best represented with how well he carries his pads on Saturday afternoons. The instincts with the ball in his hands are first-rate, as is his peripheral vision to feel defenders around him in space.
5th round, 168th overallMinnesota Vikings (from Pittsburgh Steelers through Baltimore Ravens)Zach Davidson6'7 248/TE-Central Missouri250/4th RoundPlays TE and punts for the Mules. The team aligns him in the No. 2 slot, No. 3 slot, Y-TE and offset FB. If he can improve as an in-line blocker and eliminate the drops, his foot speed and athleticism gives him a chance to become even more.
6th round, 199th overallMinnesota VikingsJaylen Twyman6’2 301/DT-Pittsburgh316/4th RoundIt was impressive that he pumped out 40 repetitions at 225 pounds on his Pro Day in March. However, that really isn’t his game when you turn on the film. The 2019 second-team All-American has some lower body strength, but he is most satisfied winning with arm overs and swim moves.
Chicago Bears
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 11th overallChicago Bears (trade from New York Giants)Justin Fields6’3 227 QB-Ohio State31/2nd RoundFields goes to a football team where he can add arm strength to pierce balls through the wind and add diversity to the team’s running team.
2nd round, 39th overallChicago Bears (from Carolina Panthers)Tevin Jenkins6’6 317/OT-Oklahoma State20/2nd RoundJenkins needs more technique work, but he has improved for the most part during his career.
5th round, 151st overallChicago Bears (from Carolina Panthers)Larry Borom6’5 327/OL-Missouri183/3rd RoundHe should not have a problem with the power of the NFL game due to his wide base and strong trunk. Dealing with the speed of NFL pass rushers, however, could become an issue.
6th round, 217th overallChicago Bears (via Tampa Bay Buccaneers (compensatory selection)Khalil Herbert5’8 204 RB-Virginia Tech, Kansas203/4th RoundIt was a bit of a surprise that Herbert never returned kickoffs while at Kansas, but he became a hit at Virginia Tech in that regard.
In addition, his ball security ranks as a plus entering the NFL. Herbert never fumbled in the Big 12 or ACC. He may not have a dominant trait, but his smooth nature makes him difficult to get a grasp on down-to-down.
6th round, 221st overallChicago Bears (compensatory selection)Dazz Newsome5’10 190/All-purpose-North Carolina190/4th RoundHis 188 career receptions are supported by a nine yard per carry average and over 11 yards per punt return. Newsome is an all-purpose weapon with upside in the slot or the return game.
6th round, 228th overallChicago Bears (compensatory selection)Thomas Graham, Jr.5'10 193/CB-Oregon112/3rd RoundPrior to opting out of the 2020 season, he had already put together a full career’s worth of film for NFL teams to devour. He’s tough, competitive, sturdy and generally displayed good technique week-to-week in the Pac-12. He works to stay aligned in the team’s coverage concepts and is rarely out of position.
7th round, 250th overallChicago Bears (from Seattle Seahawks)Khyiris Tonga6’2 325/DT-BYU171/3rd RoundDid 35 bench press reps at 225 pounds. In today’s NFL, the splash interior defensive line prospects typically are able to work to half a man for quick penetration. This is not Tonga’s game. Where he does flash in the passing game revolves around his timing to cloud passing lanes. He finished his career with 12 pass deflections.
Green Bay Packers
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 29th overallGreen Bay PackersEric Stokes6’1 194/CB-Georgia35/2nd RoundStokes continued to get better year-to-year, but prior to 2020 he hadn’t finished on the ball. The 10.39 100-meter sprinter finished with four interceptions as a senior.
2nd round, 62nd overallGreen Bay PackersJosh Myers6’5 310/OC-Ohio State168/3rd Round10 1/2” hands. Myers is capable of getting to most of his spots but his hand placement is a question mark. He is a fit in a zone blocking scheme and it might be at a guard position as opposed to center.
3rd round, 85th overallGreen Bay Packers (from Tennessee Titans)Amari Rodgers5’9 212/WR-Clemson99/3rd RoundRodgers was just five months removed from a spring ACL tear (knee injury) in 2019, so did Tigers fans truly see the best he had to offer? If 2020 was any indication, then probably not. He looked stronger, more decisive and faster as a senior. In addition, his route-running savvy took another step forward. At 211 pounds, he is more than willing as a blocker, runs well after the catch and separates with timely cuts on option patterns.
4th round, 142nd overallGreen Bay Packers (compensatory selection)Royce Newman6’5 306/OL-Ole Miss234/4th RoundHe has started at OG (LG) and moved to RT in 2020. Allowed just one QB sack at OG in 2019. Plays with hot feet. We think he has positional versatility as a backup at three-to-four different line spots.
5th round, 173rd overallGreen Bay PackersTedarrell Slaton6’4 330/DT-Florida416/5th RoundHe seemed to get his weight down to around the 340-pound range in 2020 and it helped him play with more consistency. The projected two-down defender has upside as a zero-technique in three-man fronts and one-technique in four-man schemes.
5th round, 178th overallGreen Bay Packers (compensatory selection)Shemar Jean-Charles5'10 184/CB-Appalachian State171/3rd RoundTeam captain. One of the areas which stands out with Jean-Charles is his ability to accelerate in the move area (12-to-16 yards). Whether it is playing off-man or using a bail-and-run, he accelerates with energy once the receiver makes a decision to go vertical.
6th round, 214th overallGreen Bay PackersCole Van Lanen6’5 304/OT-Wisconsin156/3rd RoundVan Lanen has enough length to keep defenders at bay, but he is somewhat narrow overall. It will be import for him to unlock his hands with increased urgency to handle NFL-style pass rushers.
6th round, 220th overallGreen Bay Packers (compensatory selection)Isaiah McDuffie6'2 225/LB-Boston College248/4th RoundCollegiately, McDuffie was able to outrun a number of his mistakes. We don’t anticipate that remaining the same at the NFL level. The second-team All-ACC linebacker is a run-and-chase type who will need to be covered up as a Will linebacker.
7th round, 256th overallGreen Bay PackersKylin Hill5’10 214/Mississippi State83/3rd RoundHis low center of gravity allows him to slide and dart with square-stance cuts to get back north-south.
In 2020, no one was expecting to see Hill get 20 carries per game in first-year head coach Mike Leach’s air raid system. He never received more than seven (in a game).
Eric Stokes CB Green Bay Packers
2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC North: Eric Stokes was drafted by the Green Bay Packers with the 29th pick overall.

2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC West

The 2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC West edition featured more than a few diminutive but exciting all purpose receiver selections. The Seattle Seahawks and Los Angeles Rams had limited picks in this year’s draft but opted to select smaller receivers in D’Wayne Eskridge and Tutu Atwell. San Francisco had to figure out the quarterback position after years of injuries to their signal callers, with that said, they traded up for Trey Lance. However, as Arizona showed, defensive picks can still be worthy of a first round selection (Zaven Collins- 16th overall). But as the trend seems to be, the Cardinals like LA and Seattle, drafted a short receiver in Rondale Moore (pictured above).

San Francisco 49ers     
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 3rd overallSan Francisco 49ersTrey Lance6’4 226/QB-North Dakota State34/2nd RoundLance goes to an offense that should spotlight his ability to operate on the edges or from inside the pocket.
2nd round, 48th overallSan Francisco 49ers (from Las Vegas Raiders)Aaron Banks6’5 338/OG-Notre Dame177/3rd RoundInside, he can move bodies with thump at the point of attack. His base will get too wide in pass protection and the challenge for him surrounds improving hand placement. Pass rushers have a tough time moving him if he can form a lockout and sit down in the chair.
3rd round, 88th overallSan Francisco 49ers (from Los Angeles Rams)Trey Sermon6'0 216/RB-Ohio State, Oklahoma57/2nd RoundHis strength is very good, as is his ability to pick his feet up through trash around his ankles and feet. We expect him to improve in pass protection due to his natural lower body explosiveness. He has upside as a receiver out of the backfield because he can make the first tackler miss in space. Durability issues aside, Sermon has starting potential in the NFL as a Melvin Gordon III-type (Denver Broncos).
3rd round, 102nd overallSan Francisco 49ersAmbry Thomas6’0 187/CB-Michigan53/2nd RoundOn the outside, he needs to be technique-sound because he is not necessarily a long corner. Thomas has lost quite a bit of practice time over the past two seasons and the fact that he has been able to still perform at a high level bodes well for his future prospects.
5th round, 155th overallSan Francisco 49ersJaylon Moore6’4 311/OT-Western Michigan164/3rd RoundMoore is durable and strong. This is where you have to begin with him because he has the ability to sit in the chair and grapple with opponents. Overall, he provides the ability to potentially backup three-to-four line positions.
5th round, 172nd overallSan Francisco 49ers (from New Orleans Saints)Deommodore Lenoir5’10 199/CB-Oregon137/3rd RoundFinished his career with 34 straight starts.
Lenoir wore three different numbers during his career and the results were largely the same in each year.
We think he is physical enough as a tackler that he could possibly move inside to safety.
5th round, 180th overallSan Francisco 49ers (compensatory selection)Talanoa Hufanga6’1 215/S-USC182/3rd RoundHufanga is an intense junior-entry who flies all over the field and brings quite a bit of juice when he unloads on contact. It is a big reason he was able to force four fumbles in school. We think his best attribute is an ability to blitz off the edge, either by disguise or when coming down late off of movement by the offense
6th round, 194th overallSan Francisco 49ersElijah Mitchell5’10 215/RB-Louisiana-Lafayette143/3rd RoundHe runs with power, contains a vertical style and rarely is caught moving side-to-side if unnecessary. Every three-to-four carries, he will bust a long carry (see Georgia State ‘20) due to his churning style. He does not mind taking the three-or-four-yard runs to set up the bigger carries.
Arizona Cardinals
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 16th overallArizona CardinalsZaven Collins6’4 260 LB-Tulsa13/1st RoundCollins’ skills can now pair with Simmons to give the Cardinals defensive flexibility in spades. The team adds a player who creates difficult one-on-one matchups for teams on third down.
2nd round, 49th overallArizona CardinalsRondale Moore5’7 180/WR-Purdue40/2nd RoundStrong in the lower body. Squats over 600 pounds. His ability to track the football overcomes a somewhat limited catch radius. Overall, he is a first-round talent with enough durability question marks to last until Day 2.
4th round, 136th overallArizona Cardinals (from Baltimore Ravens via Kansas City Chiefs)Marco Wilson6'0 187 Nickel/Florida131/3rd RoundThe former Freshman All-SEC defender can cover multiple spots, play as a big nickel and even contribute outside at
corner. Injuries were an issue in school. 4.38 speed. 43 1/2” VJ.
6th round, 210th overallArizona Cardinals (from Baltimore Ravens)Victor Dimukeje6'2 262/DE-OLB-Duke259/4th RoundDimukeje is a leverage-based pass rusher with experience both standing up and playing with his hand in the dirt. His bend will be questioned by NFL teams, but he overcomes that by attempting to lean on the offensive tackle's upfield shoulder.
6th round, 223rd overallArizona Cardinals (from Minnesota Vikings; compensatory selection)Tay Gowan6’1 186 CB/UCF341/5th RoundGowan is a tall, angular cornerback with positive football instincts and very good length for the outside cornerback spot. We were impressed with his balance and footwork when using a bail-and-run technique.
7th round, 243rd overallArizona CardinalsJames Wiggins5’11 20926/2nd RoundHe has everything NFL teams desire in flex-safeties with his combination of foot speed, short-area quickness and explosiveness on contact. In addition, he has extensive experience covering slot receivers in school. If there is a question on Wiggins, it revolves around some tightness in the lower half. Despite first-round talent, can Wiggins stay healthy?
7th round, 247th overallArizona Cardinals (from Chicago Bears through Las Vegas Raiders)Michal Menet6’4 312/OC-Penn State207-4th RoundMenet is one of the more balanced centers in this year’s draft class. Rarely out of control, Menet’s overall football awareness for blitzes, stunts and line games is very sound.
Los Angeles Rams
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
2nd round, 57th overallLos Angeles RamsTutu Atwell5’9 155/WR-Louisville141/3rd RoundIf there is a more electric, elusive, fully-charged offensive player in the draft we haven’t found him. NFL teams just have to know what they’re purchasing.
Is it former Louisville wide receiver and two-time Pro Bowler Ernest Givens (Houston Oilers) or former West Virginia star Tavon Austin?
3rd round, 103rd overallLos Angeles RamsErnest Jones6'2 230/LB-South Carolina258/4th RoundJones, a junior-entry in the 2021 NFL Draft, has many tools worth taking a long look at for NFL teams. One of the things he has to improve at is getting offensive linemen off of his defensive linemen.
We think he would fit best as a run-and-chase Will linebacker at the next level because he still has to room to grow reading the triangle.
4th round, 117th overallLos Angeles Rams (from San Francisco 49ers)Bobby Brown III6'5 323/DT-Texas A&M96/3rd RoundThe first-team All-SEC defender contains lateral quickness, upper body strength and ankle flexibility. His inconsistent hand usage and up-and-down intensity are two drawbacks for teams looking for a consistent disruptor.
4th round, 130th overallLos Angeles RamsRobert Rochell6’0 195/CB-Central Arkansas129/3rd Round4.4 speed. 43 VJ. He tackles well enough and has thrown his body around with force and intent to clip the legs or wrap up ballcarriers. Rochell has all of the tools, but his technique simply has to get better for him to have a chance on Sunday afternoons.
4th round, 141st overallLos Angeles Rams (compensatory selection)Jacob Harris6'5 219/WR-UCF230/4th RoundIn watching and studying fellow receiver Gabriel Davis (Buffalo Bills) a season ago (2019), Harris kept showing up. The former soccer player’s stride sneaks up on unsuspecting cornerbacks and UCF quarterback Dillon Gabriel often had problems keeping up with it.
5th round, 174th overallLos Angeles Rams (from Buffalo Bills)Earnest Brown IV6’4 1/2” 270/DL-Northwestern217/4th RoundBlessed with an 82 1/4-inch wingspan and 34 1/2" arms, Brown IV can keep blockers away from him. We were impressed that he was able to drop into zones effectively and consistently affected the three-step passing game.
7th round, 233rd overallLos Angeles Rams (via Houston Texans (rom Cincinnati Bengals)Jake Funk5’10 204/All-Purpose-Maryland301/4th RoundSince Funk came out of high school, he has gotten bigger, stronger and faster in school. All of this occurred while enduring two torn ACLs to the same knee in consecutive seasons. This speaks to his work ethic and overall football character. Despite playing RB and averaging 8-plus yards per carry, Funk had 28 tackles in school on special teams.
7th round, 249th overallLA Rams (via Jacksonville Jaguars from Tennessee Titans)Ben Skowronek6'2 211/WR-Notre Dame276-4th RoundSkowronek’s wasted movement has improved dramatically since his freshman year at Northwestern. He closes the cushion of defenders with an underrated stride off the ball.
Most Northwestern fans will remember his game-winning diving touchdown grab that put the Wildcats in the 2018 Big Ten title game. He beat Denver Broncos starting cornerback Michael Ojemudia on the play.
Seattle Seahawks
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
2nd round, 56th overallSeattle SeahawksD’Wayne Eskridge5’9 184/All-Purpose-Western Michigan115/3rd RoundDespite standing just 5-foot-9, he packs a solid 188 pounds on his frame. He breaks arm tackles and excels when he runs through the reception point, particularly on quick slants. His toughness is also exemplary, especially considering that he has played the cornerback position respectably and stood out crack blocking safeties. The 2020 MAC Special Teams Player of the Year fits the definition of an all-purpose prospect.
4th round, 137th overallSeattle SeahawksTre Brown5'9 184/CB-Oklahoma179/3rd RoundBrown is an ultra-quick cornerback with good transition ability to drop his weight on intermediate routes. Physically, he may have to deal with the physical rigors of a nickel position to secure a spot in a Seattle’s defensive back rotation.
6th round, 208th overallSeattle Seahawks (from Chicago Bears)Stone Forsythe6’8 307/OT-Florida452/6th RoundNFL bloodlines. Has started at RT and LT. Also has seen time at OG. Looks the part.
During the postseason, it was important for the former Gator to prove that his ability to hold down a starting spot on the blindside in the SEC had as much to do with his movement as it did his size. Mission accomplished.

2021 NFL Draft Recap: AFC East

The AFC East 2021 NFL Draft recap features a Patriots team that kept up with the Joneses and a Jets squad who picked its franchise quarterback. The Bills got longer on defense while the Dolphins increased its team speed.

Buffalo Bills      
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 30th overallBuffalo BillsGregory Rousseau6’6 5/8” 266/DE-Miami (Fla.)8/1st RoundThe Bills take a pass rusher with 11-inch hands and an 83” wingspan. Rousseau had 15.5 QB sacks in 2019 and was tough to latch while working from a number of spots.
2nd Round, 61st overallBuffalo BillsCarlos “Boogie” Basham6’3 1/2” 274 DE-Wake Forest36/2nd RoundFrom a technical perspective, Basham is pretty advanced with his pass rush moves working off the edge. Some teams won’t like his hand size and arm length, but he is slippery and strong in the lower body. Few players in the ACC matched Basham’s production.
3rd Round, 93rd overallBuffalo BillsSpencer Brown6’8 314/OT-Northern Iowa100/3rd RoundThe former eight-man Iowa high school football standout transitioned impressively to 11-man football. He’s gained nearly 100 pounds (94) since his high school days. His chest exposure is simply due to leverage, but his ability to sit down can be seen in the pre-snap, when his body is lower than the rest of his offensive line.
5th Round, 161st overallBuffalo Bills (from Las Vegas Raiders)Tommy Doyle6'8 320/OT-Miami (OH.)184/3rd RoundAs a taller tackle, he will always be challenged by his posture versus leverage-based defensive ends. He compensates with a heavy punch to widen them in either the run or pass game.
6th Round, 203rd overallBuffalo Bills (from Washington Football Team via Houston Texans, Las Vegas Raiders and Miami Dolphins)Marquez Stevenson5'10 182/All-Purpose-Houston256/4th RoundStevenson has been a game breaker for the Cougars working in the slot or as a return specialist. He endured a number of major injuries in school and there are questions on how he responds to the physicality of the NFL.
6th Round, 212th overallBuffalo Bills (from Houston Texans via New Orleans Saints)Damar Hamlin6’0 201/S-Pittsburgh176/3rd RoundGood length. Smart. Communicates with fellow safeties using hand signals. He has decent feet and enough movement skills. He’s almost like an extra nickel back in their schemes.
6th Round, 213th overallBuffalo BillsRachad Wildgoose5'11 197/CB-Wisconsin238/4th RoundWe project him as a nickel defender on the next level because of his experience in a pro-style scheme under creative Wisconsin defensive coordinator Jim Leonhard. He has some physical similarities to Kansas City Chiefs defensive back Rashad Fenton.
7th Round, 236th overallBuffalo Bills (from Carolina Panthers)Jack Anderson6’4 309/OG-OC-Texas Tech165/3rd RoundYou can turn on the video from 2018 to see that he was going to be an NFL prospect. His awareness, footwork and balance all rank among the best in this year’s class of interior linemen.
Miami Dolphins
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
6th overallMiami DolphinsJaylen WaddleWR-Alabama28/2nd RoundWaddle is the next receiver to go off the board to be re-united with his former college QB. His foot speed expands the Dolphins’ vertical passing game.
18th overallMiami DolphinsJaelen Phillips6’5 260 DE-Miami (Fla.), UCLA43/2nd RoundPhillips has all of the tools to become an instant contributor opposite Emmanuel Ogbah. Can he stay healthy?
36th overallMiami DolphinsJevon Holland6’1 207/S-Oregon15/2nd RoundThe All-Pac-12 defender, and our top-ranked S/NB, is a former high school wide receiver with the instincts to anticipate ball location. It is a big reason why he made a number of plays versus fade patterns when defending slot receivers.
42nd overallMiami Dolphins (from New York Giants)Liam Eichenberg6’6 303 OT-Notre Dame32/2nd RoundWhenever a collegian has outstanding technique NFL teams begin to wonder about upside. Maybe it should be the other way around.
Continued flexibility gains should be in order for the Saint Ignatius High School product, who earned All-American honors because he reduced the pre-snap mistakes.
81st overallMiami DolphinsHunter Long6'5 253/TE-Boston College116/3rd RoundBased on the Eagles’ run-heavy schemes, he often got behind defenses because he was used as a hand in the dirt tight end. A solid in-line blocker with good, but not great strength, Long exudes a smoothness on the field that translates to Sundays. We were not necessarily impressed with the suddenness in which he got of his breaks, but at his size he doesn’t have to really be open. His 83-inch wingspan affords him to only have to get a step on the defender on tightly contested throws.
6th Round, 231st overallMiami Dolphins (from Houston Texans)Larnel Coleman6’6 308/OT-UMass319/4th Round84 3/8” wingspan.
Primarily a tackle-only prospect, he does have experience at both tackle spots. The Massachusetts native is not a consistent bender, but plays with hot feet. He has the ability to mirror yet doesn’t truly sit in the chair.
The former basketball standout has technical flaws but competed well in the film viewed.
7th Round, 244th overallMiami Dolphins (via Washington Football Team from Las Vegas Raiders)Gerrid Doaks6'0 230/RB-Cincinnati182/3rd RoundFor a running back weighing in the 230-pound range, Doaks is athletic, fast enough and tough. We were perhaps most impressed with his hands out of the backfield as a receiver and his pass blocking skill in blitz pickup.
New England Patriots
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 15th overallNew England PatriotsMac Jones6’2 217 QB-Alabama39/2nd RoundJones goes to the Patriots to develop in a system that could spotlight all of his respective strengths.
2nd Round, 38th overallNew England Patriots (from Cincinnati Bengals)Christian Barmore6'5 310/DT-Alabama14/2nd RoundThe Philadelphia native is more of a heavyweight boxer than anything else. For him to truly evolve into a consistent disruptor at the next level, he has to master the intricacies of footwork versus different run blocking schemes.
3rd Round, 96th overallNew England PatriotsRonnie Perkins6’2 1/2” 253/DE-OLB-Oklahoma65/2nd RoundStanding 6-foot-2, he is able to play with a forward lean while keeping good balance. Rarely is he extended too far over his toes.
Academic warrior. Plays in a three-point, two-point or four-point stances on the edge.
4th Round, 120th overallNew England PatriotsRhamondre Stevenson6’0 230/RB-Oklahoma289/4th RoundThe good thing for Stevenson is that there are not a lot of miles on his tires. This bodes well for his 2021 outlook and beyond when it comes to the NFL. He may get more carries in his first NFL season than he did in all of college.
6th Round, 177th overallNew England Patriots (compensatory selection)Cameron McGrone6’3 236/LB-Michigan179/3rd RoundHis field speed is unquestionable and we saw him contribute on special teams. Special teams will be his lifeline as he adjusts to the fast-paced nature of the NFL game. Or, if healthy, will the NFL have to adjust to his fast-paced nature?
6th Round, 188th overallNew England Patriots (from Houston Texans)Joshuah Bledsoe5’11 201/S-Missouri321/4th RoundThere were some missed tackles in the film viewed as a result of the aforementioned stiffness. The former multi-position prep level standout has a good feel for the game and is a competitive player. He played his best in critical moments (see Arkansas, LSU in 2020).
6th Round, 197th overallNew England PatriotsWilliam Sherman6'3 304/OL-Colorado264/4th RoundHe successfully made the switch from left tackle to right tackle and then back to left tackle as a senior. At just one-half inch over 6-foot-3, New England may envision Sherman moving inside to guard. He even worked out at the center position on his Pro Day.
7th Round, 242nd overallNew England PatriotsTre Nixon6’1 187/WR-UCF, Ole Miss188/4th RoundIn just four games in 2020, Nixon averaged 65 yards per contest and this was in an offense that spread the ball around quite a bit. His size, speed and route-running remind us of former Pittsburg State wideout John Brown (Cardinals, Bills) coming out of college.
New York Jets
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPositionSchoolNotes
1st Round, 2nd overallNew York JetsZach Wilson6'2 214/QB-BYU25/2nd RoundWilson could be a BYU mix of former Cougar standouts Jim McMahon and Steve Young.
1st Round, 14th overallNew York Jets (from Minnesota Vikings)Alijah Vera-Tucker6’4 302/OT-USC6/1st RoundVera-Tucker could pair with Becton on the left side to potentially power an offensive line that could develop into one of the AFC’s best.
2nd Round, 34th overallNew York JetsElijah Moore5’9 184/WR-Ole Miss44/2nd RoundFrom the opening week breakout performance against Florida (10 receptions, 227 yards) through the rest of the season, he found ways to extricate Ole Miss out of trouble.
4th Round, 107th overallNew York JetsMichael Carter5’8 201/RB-UNC60/2nd RoundCarter, who won UNC’s Strength and Conditioning Award for Outstanding Lifter, makes it happen in a powerful fashion. How often do you hear that statement made about a 5-foot-7, 202-pound running back? He is built low to the ground and contains outstanding contact balance.
5th Round, 146th overallNew York JetsJamien Sherwood6’2 204/S-Auburn369/5th RoundHe played a number of roles for the Tigers, but the nickel LB spot was where he showed a lot of skills. Sherwood finished his career with 10 tackles for loss and posted 75 tackles in 2020.
154th overallNew York Jets (from New York Giants)Michael Carter II5’10 184/Nickel-Duke360/5th RoundDue to his plus play speed and instincts, Carter II earned third-team All-ACC honors in 2020. He struggled with torn knee ligaments in 2018 and struggled the rest of the year.
5th Round, 175th overallNew York Jets (via Kansas City Chiefs)Jason Pinnock6’0 1/2” 204/CB-Pittsburgh233/4th RoundPinnock, a former high school wide receiver, played with confidence when on the field. He was able to perform at either nickel or cornerback with equal parts bravado. He tackled adequately and -despite getting spun around in press-man too easily at times- held his line in the sand more often than not.
6th Round, 186th overallNew York JetsHamsah Nasirildeen6’3 213/S-FSU59/2nd RoundLong. 34 1/2-inch arms. Fluid enough. Positive knee bend for a taller DB. Has played DB and LB while in school.
As a 6-foot-3, 213- pounder, is he going to be used as a sub-package matchup player? If so, he could find a home at the linebacker spot.
6th Round, 200th overallNew York Jets (via Las Vegas Raiders)Brandin Echols5'10 179/CB-Kentucky138/3rd RoundHis size remains a question mark. The movement skills, instincts and body control are not question marks. Neither is his effort. The former state champion long jumper has the potential to be a starting nickel back in the NFL.
6th Round, 207th overallNew York Jets (from Kansas City Chiefs via Pittsburgh Steelers through Miami Dolphins)Jonathan Marshall6’3 309/DT-Arkansas223/4th RoundMarshall is a former prep level basketball player with positive movement skills on the field. He impressed with his power and strength in the film viewed at the zero-technique nose guard spot.

2021 NFL Draft Recap: AFC West

In the AFC West, the Raiders got defensive in hopes of trying to solidify its defense and the Chiefs added a Bolton to its defensive front seven. The Chargers added a slayer to its offensive line and the Broncos are Surtain their choice could help the D. Overall, the AFC West had one of the most interesting draft weekends in the conference.

Denver Broncos      
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 9th overallDenver BroncosPatrick Surtain II6’2 208 CB-Alabama7/1st RoundThe Broncos take the second consecutive CB off of the board and his technique is arguably the best.
2nd Round, 35th overallDenver Broncos (from Atlanta Falcons)Javonte Williams5'10 212 RB-UNC33/2nd RoundHis physicality, ball skills, short yardage capability and lack of mileage make him a very attractive option as a potential fourth quarter closer.
3rd Round, 98th overallDenver BroncosQuinn Meinerz6’3 320/OL-Wisconsin-Whitewater225/4th RoundThere is no doubt that his explosion, play strength and even hand usage can impress down-to-down. However, the top-heavy nature finds him on the ground when the detonations are launched at the wrong entry points to connect on opponents. Finding a balance will be key for Meinerz whether he stays at offensive guard or moves to center, where he performed admirably in the postseason.
105th overallDenver BroncosBaron Browning6’3 240/LB-Ohio State26/2nd RoundBrowning is a prospect who can rush versus offensive tackles off the edge, play the exchange linebacker and line up over tight ends. As a pass rusher out of his two-point stance on the edge, his speed can be too much to handle for offensive tackles.
5th Round, 152nd overallDenver BroncosCaden Sterns6’0 202/S-Texas38/2nd RoundSterns benefits from the reputation he garnered after producing an All-American freshman campaign. Since that season, he has been like an appetizer leaving you wanting more. In the games viewed, he was a willing, if inconsistent, tackler who produced very good laps to get over the top of his cornerbacks as a deep middle safety.
5th Round, 164th overallDenver Broncos (via Chicago Bears)Jamar Johnson6’1 197/S-Indiana105/3rd RoundThe athleticism and movement are evident when watching Johnson play in the deep zones or blitzing from depth. The tackling techniques have been inconsis-tent and left something to be desired when he doesn’t keep his head up to tackle.
6th Round, 219th overallDenver Broncos (from Atlanta Falcons via compensatory selection)Seth Williams6’2 211 WR-Auburn91/3rd RoundOn more than one occasion, he has leapt over defenders in one-on-one situations to post highlight-film wor-thy grabs. The level of consistency in all phases of his game is missing at times.
7th Round, 237th overallDenver BroncosKary Vincent, Jr.5’10 185/Nickel-LSU202/4th RoundVincent, Jr. actually manned the tough nickel back position for the Tigers during their 2019 national championship season and did so admirably. While he did jam wide receivers on occasion, he was much more frequently seen playing off-man coverage in the slot.
7th Round, 239th overallDenver Broncos (from New York Giants)Jonathon Cooper6’2 254/DE-OLB-Ohio State279/4th RoundCooper is a natural knee bender who competes at a high level no matter where he lines up. His ordinary width gets him tied up on the perimeter by longer offensive tackles. Don't be surprised if he earns reps as a sub-package three-technique defensive tackle.
7th Round, 253rd overallDenver Broncos (from Cleveland Browns)Marquiss Spencer6’4 301/DT-Mississippi State414/5th RoundSpencer has shown in flashes capability as a four-technique defensive end, left defensive end and occasional three-technique defensive tackle in the film viewed. His durability concerns will get vetted by NFL teams.
Kansas City Chiefs
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
2nd Round, 58th overallKansas City ChiefsNick Bolton5’11 237/LB-Missouri77/3rd RoundThe positives include down-to-down intensity, pass coverage instincts and blitz capability. His treks on outside runs, varied depending on whether he took the backdoor on his angle to the ball. He is a quick-twitched, fast athlete with pop on contact.
2nd Round, 63rd overallKansas City ChiefsCreed Humphrey6’4 312/OC-Oklahoma51/2nd RoundThe 2020 Big 12 Offensive Lineman of the Year is a left-handed snapper with some flaws, but his technique, guile and football intelligence ensure him a good chance of becoming an NFL starter.
4th Round, 144th overallKansas City Chiefs (compensatory selection)Joshua Kaindoh6’6 260/DE-OLB Florida State212/4th RoundHe has operated from a two-point alignment and with his hand in the dirt. Is his best football ahead of him? Time will tell. It was unfortunate he got injured in the first game of the season (Georgia Tech '20) and never seemed to fully recover.
5th Round, 162nd overallKansas City Chiefs (via Las Vegas Raiders from Miami Dolphins)Noah Gray6'3 240/H-back-Duke358/5th RoundTeam captain. Classroom warrior. Plays the down TE, U-off TE, flexed-out slot and FB spots for the Blue Devils. It is evident that he has a wide receiver-like feel for separating in tight quarters with his quickness.
5th Round, 181st overallKansas City Chiefs (compensatory selection)Cornell Powell6’0 205/WR-Clemson217/4th RoundStrong hands. Snatches the football on routes outside of his frame.
He simply needs to prove that he can contribute on special teams, as he did not record a career tackle.
6th Round, 226th overallKC Chiefs (from New York Jets via Carolina Panthers; compensatory selection)Trey Smith6’5 338/OG-Tennessee54/2nd RoundSmith had medical concerns and some issues concerning his overall balance. If he can keep his weight at a manageable level, then he may be able to provide versatility for the Chiefs, as he’s started both inside and outside in school.
Las Vegas Raiders
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 17th overallLas Vegas RaidersAlex Leatherwood6’5 312 OL-Alabama104/3rd RoundThe 2020 Outland Trophy winner may make a move to the inside, where he was a second-team All-SEC player at RG in 2018. If he can eliminate the penalties and concentration lapses, the Raiders could look back on this pick with a smile on their faces.
2nd Round, 43rd overallLas Vegas Raiders (from San Francisco 49ers)Trevon Moehrig6’1 202 S-TCU30/2nd RoundMoehrig’s smooth nature on the field hides any minor deficien-cies that may illuminate from some questionable tackling angles in space. His communicative nature is much-needed for a secondary that lacked it in 2020.
3rd Round, 79th overallLas Vegas RaidersMalcolm Koonce6’2 249/DE-OLB-Buffalo102/3rd RoundKoonce, a former rugby star, was unable to perform for NFL teams this postseason after hurting his foot. After a couple of seasons where he was painstakingly difficult for offensive tackles to block, teams did not get to evaluate him further versus NFL-caliber competition. There are instances where teams can extrapolate his play against tougher offensive tackles (i.e. Penn State ‘19, Charlotte ‘19).
3rd Round, 80th overallLas Vegas RaidersDivine Deablo6'3 226/S-LB-Virginia Tech78/3rd RoundPlayers like Deablo can become valuable pieces in today’s NFL. He may not quite have the fluidity to man a position off of the hash marks, but at 6-foot-3, 226 pounds, he may very well be positioned to play in sub-packages as a linebacker when teams use dime (six defensive backs) personnel. His experience will pay dividends, but he has to become more consistent as a tackler.
5th Round, 143rd overallLas Vegas Raiders from New York Jets (via Minnesota Vikings-compensatory selection)Tyree Gillespie5’11 207/S-Missouri232/4th RoundGillepsie developed from a solid special teams player in 2017 into a productive safety for the Tigers the last two seasons The former high school tailback is active, fast and instinctive in run support. Special tams work may be able to keep him on the game day roster, but his skills give him a chance to compete at safety.
5th Round, 167th overallLas Vegas Raiders (from Seattle Seahawks)Nate Hobbs5’11 189/CB-Illinois224/4th RoundHobbs has a chance to make it in the NFL playing cornerback due to his movement in coverage. The 5-foot-11 former high jumper has good feet and can squeeze routes from the outside-in or plant to close back downhill at 45-degree angles out of his zone turns. The Raiders are hoping he challenges more routes in coverage.
7th Round, 230th overallLas Vegas Raiders (from San Francisco 49ers via New York Jets)Jimmy Morrissey6’3 303/C-Pittsburgh154/3rd RoundThe academic warrior passed up a number of Ivy League offers to walk-on at Pittsburgh and that says all anyone needs to know about how much he loves the game. After all, how many players walk on at an ACC school and become a four-year starter? Morrissey could surprise in training camp to grab a seventh or eighth OL spot on game day.
Los Angeles Chargers
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 13th overallLos Angeles ChargersRashawn Slater6’4 304 OT-Northwestern16/2nd RoundSlater’s technique gives the Chargers added flexibility on its offensive lineman, as the former OL has started at both RT and LT.
2nd Round, 47th overallLos Angeles ChargersAsante Samuel, Jr.5’10 184/CB-FSU90/3rd RoundSamuel, Jr’s journey to the NFL follows in his father’s footsteps and the comparisons are valid. Samuel, Jr. may not be quite as sudden, but he does have similar instincts in zone coverage.
Samuel, Jr.’s ability to read through the quarterback while using a skate-bail technique is eerily similar to his father’s while with the Patriots and Eagles.
3rd Round, 77th overallLos Angeles ChargersJosh Palmer6’1 210/WR-Tennessee118/3rd RoundPalmer displayed all of the necessary tools during his final two seasons to suggest he can become a better pro than collegian. His stride closed the cushion on de-fensive backs. Palmer exhibited the length/dexterity to snag passes away from his frame and won against players who are going to be NFL draft picks.
3rd Round, 97th overallLos Angeles ChargersTre’ McKitty6'4 246/TE-H-back-Georgia, FSU193/4th RoundMcKitty is a muscular H-back/TE-type who has moved around in a variance of roles for two different programs. We have seen him understand angles in the blocking game, show run after the catch skill and attack the seams of defenses. Despite never being the lead receiver at either Georgia or FSU, McKitty has frequently been a legitimate third down target.
4th Round, 118th overallLos Angeles ChargersChris Rumph II6’2 244/DE-OLB-Duke102/3rd RoundIs he stout enough to be used as a stand-up outside linebacker or even a Sam linebacker? In spots, he has shown enough strength to handle the action versus “some” tight ends. On third downs, he has the ability to drop into coverage or rush from multiple positions. We think he can add positive weight and become a consistent rotation rusher for new DC Renaldo Hill’s defense.
5th Round, 159th overallLos Angeles ChargersBrenden Jaimes6'5 300/DT-Nebraska214/4th Round40 consecutive starts in school. Not many true freshman start along the offensive line in the Big Ten, much less at offensive tackle. Jaimes did so at the right tackle spot in 2017 before sliding over to the left tackle position he’s manned for the last three seasons.
6th Round, 185th overallLos Angeles Chargers (from Jacksonville Jaguars through Tennessee Titans)Nick Niemann6'3 234/LB-Iowa174/3rd RoundNiemann is a former high school wide receiver from a family full of Hawkeyes. In fact, his brother Ben, finished the 2020 season with 44 tackles for the Kansas City Chiefs. It seemed like Nick was following in big brother Ben’s footsteps well after a 10-tackle performance against Wisconsin in 2018, but a leg injury curbed his development during that season.
6th Round, 198th overallLos Angeles ChargersLarry Rountree III5’10 216/RB-Missouri239/4th RoundRountree III tallied nearly 4,000 yards rushing and fumbled just five times on over 800 career touches. This despite being somewhat right-hand dominant as a runner at times. He has active feet that can step in-and-out of tackles.
7th Round, 241st overallLos Angeles ChargersMark Webb6’1 210/S-Georgia274/4th RoundWebb is a former wide receiver who seemed to have a pretty good feel for route combinations working at the team’s Star position the last two seasons. While he frequently was asked to cover tight ends and wide receivers, he also showed some ability to play off the hash marks on occasion.