Category Archives: AFC

2021 NFL Free Agency, Live Updates: AFC South

The AFC South features two new head coaches and potentially three new signal-callers heading in 2021. How is each team stacking up heading into the 2021 NFL Draft? Please come back day-to-day as we will provide live updates on each of your favorite teams.

AFC South

Tennessee Titans

Offensive free agents

WR Adam Humphries

WR Corey Davis (Agreed to terms with the Jets)

TE MyCole Pruitt

LT Marshall Newhouse

RB Senorise Perry

TE Geoff Swaim (re-signed)

TE Jonnu Smith (Agreed to terms with Patriots)

RB D’Onta Foreman

WR Kalif Raymond

TE Anthony Firkser

FB Khari Blasingame

Defensive free agents

DE Jadeveon Clowney

CB Malcolm Butler

DT DaQuan Jones

S Kenny Vaccaro

DT Jack Crawford

LB Daren Bates

LB Nick Dzubnar

LB Will Compton

CB Breon Borders (re-signed)

CB Tye Smith

CB Desmond King

LB Jayon Brown

DT Matt Dickerson

S Joshua Kalu

DE Tuzar Skipper (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Re-signed CB Breon Borders, DE Tuzar Skipper, TE Geoff Swaim, K Tucker McCann
  • Released CB Adoree Jackson, OT Dennis Kelly
  • Agreed to terms with OLB Bud Dupree (Steelers) on a multi-year deal, DE Denico Autry (Colts) on three-year deal, LT Kendall Lamm (Browns), DE Davin Bellamy (Texans), CB Janoris Jenkins (Saints)
  • Lost WR Corey Davis (Jets), TE Jonnu Smith (Patriots)
  • Traded 2020 first-round pick OT Isaiah Wilson and a 202 seventh-round pick to the Miami Dolphins for a 2021 seventh-round pick

Houston Texans

Offensive free agents

RB David Johnson (re-signed)

C Nick Martin

RB Duke Johnson

QB A.J. McCarron

WR Will Fuller

RG Senio Kelemete

LT Roderick Johnson

QB Josh McCown

RT Brent Qvale

TE Pharaoh Brown (re-signed)

RB Dontrell Hilliard (re-signed)

FB Cullen Gillaspia (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

RB Buddy Howell (re-signed)

C Greg Mancz (Agreed to terms with Ravens)

Defensive free agents

DE J.J. Watt (Agreed to terms with Cardinals)

DE Brennan Scarlett

CB Gareon Conley

LB Dylan Cole

CB Vernon Hargreaves

CB Phillip Gaines

S Michael Thomas

LB Tyrell Adams

LB Kyle Emanuel

DT P.J. Hall (re-signed)

DT Carlos Watkins (Agreed to terms with the Cowboys)

CB Mark Fields (Agreed to terms with 49ers)

DT Eddie Vanderdoes

DE Peter Kalambayi

CB Cornell Armstrong (re-signed)

S Geno Stone

CB A.J. Moore (re-signed)

DE Davin Bellamy (Agreed to terms with Titans)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Traded LB Bernardrick McKinney to Miami for DE Shaq Lawson and swapped draft picks in the fourth, fifth and sixth rounds in a trade with New England for OL Marcus Cannon
  • Agreed to terms with QB Tyrod Taylor (Chargers) on a one-year deal, WR Andre Roberts (Bills), WR Chris Moore (Ravens), RB Mark Ingram (Ravens), DT Maleik Collins (Raiders), LB Kamu Grugier-Hill (Dolphins), LB Kevin Pierre-Louis (WFT), LB Joe Thomas (Cowboys), G Justin McCray (Falcons), CB Terrance Mitchell (Browns), CB Tremon Smith (Colts), FS Terrance Brooks (Patriots), DT Vincent Taylor (Browns), OLB Derek Rivers (Rams)
  • Re-signed RB David Johnson, DT P.J. Hall, RB Dontrell Hilliard, RB Buddy Howell, CB Cornell Armstrong, CB A.J. Moore
  • Lost OC Greg Mancz (Ravens), DE Davin Bellamy (Titans), CB Mark Fields (49ers), FB Cullen Gillaspia (Giants), DT Carlos Watkins (Cowboys)
  • Released DE J.J. Watt (Cardinals)

Jacksonville Jaguars

Offensive free agents

TE Tyler Eifert

WR Keelan Cole

WR Chris Conley

LT Cam Robinson (Franchised)

C Tyler Shatley (re-signed)

RB Chris Thompson

QB Mike Glennon (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

TE James O’Shaughnessy (re-signed)

TE Eric Saubert

WR Dede Westbrook

RB Dare Ogunbowale (re-signed)

RG Derwin Gray (re-signed)

Defensive free agents

CB D.J. Hayden

DT Abry Jones

DE Aaron Lynch

DE Dawuane Smoot (re-signed)

DT Caraun Reid

DE Adam Gotsis

CB Greg Mabin

CB Sidney Jones (re-signed)

CB Rashaan Melvin (Agreed to terms with the Panthers)

DT Daniel Ross

S Josh Jones

CB Tre Herndon (re-signed)

LB Dakota Allen (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with CB Shaquill Griffin (Seahawks) on a three-year deal, DE Roy Robertson-Harris (Bears) on a four-year deal, DE Jihad Ward (Ravens), RB Carlos Hyde (Seahawks) on a two-year deal, WR Marvin Jones, Jr. (Lions) on a two-year deal, S Rayshawn Jenkins (Chargers) on a four-year deal, S Johnathan Ford (Eagles), DL Tyson Alualu (Steelers) on a two-year deal, WR Phillip Dorsett II (Seahawks), TE Chris Manhertz (Panthers), KR Jamal Agnew (Lions), LB Chappelle Russell (Buccaneers)
  • Re-signed CB Sidney Jones, DE Dawuane Smoot, RG Derwin Gray, RB Dare Ogunbowale, C Tyler Shatley, LB Dakota Allen
  • Traded for New Orleans Saints DT Malcom Brown (Saints)
  • Lost QB Mike Glennon (Giants), CB Rashaan Melvin (Panthers)

Indianapolis Colts

Offensive free agents

QB Jacoby Brissett (Agreed to terms with Dolphins)

QB Philip Rivers (Retired)

WR T.Y. Hilton

RT Le’Raven Clark

C Joey Hunt

TE Trey Burton

LT Chaz Green

WR Zach Pascal (re-signed)

TE Mo Alie-Cox (re-signed)

RB Marlon Mack (re-signed)

WR Ashton Dulin (re-signed)

Defensive free agents

DE Justin Houston

DE Denico Autry (Agreed to terms with the Titans)

S Malik Hooker

CB Xavier Rhodes

S Tavon Wilson

CB T.J. Carrie

DT Taylor Stallworth (re-signed)

CB Tremon Smith (Agreed to terms with the Texans)

LB Anthony Walker Jr.

DE Al-Quadin Muhammad

S George Odum (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Traded a 2021 third-round pick, a 2022 conditional second-round draft pick for QB Carson Wentz (Eagles)
  • Re-signed WR Zach Pascal, S George Odum
  • Lost QB Jacoby Brissett (Dolphins), QB Philip Rivers (retired), DE Denico Autry (Titans), CB Tremon Smith (Texans)

DraftNasty Throwback (circa 2014): Oklahoma State’s Tyreek Hill vs. FSU’s Jalen Ramsey

On August 30, 2014, the Florida State Seminoles squared off against the Oklahoma State Cowboys in the Advocare Classic. The result? A hard-fought 37-31 victory for the top-ranked Seminoles. The game within the game featured two future NFL All-Pros matching up at different positions then they would eventually star at in the NFL. At the time, current Kansas City WR Tyreek Hill was a running back/return specialist and Los Angeles Rams CB Jalen Ramsey was starring in a safety/nickel back role. In what proved to be a precursor for the future, Hill tallied an incredible total of 278 all-purpose yards. Ramsey contributed 12 tackles and 1/2 tackle for loss, while displaying outstanding agility and body control. We go inside one of college football’s best matchups of the past decade.

Hill (No. 24 pictured) was used in a myriad of ways during the matchup with the Seminoles, but Ramsey’s responsibilities (No. 8 covering Hill out of the backfield) varied quite a bit during the day as well.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC North

Baltimore Ravens  Notable picks: The Ravens went LB twice in its first five picks. It is a position that they plan to revamp with Queen and Harrison. Harrison relied on his natural instincts in school and Queen outran any poor reads. Both players have to develop quickly for the team to come close to its 2019 success in 2020.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (28) Patrick Queen6’1 229
LB/LSU
90/3rd Round Despite being just a one-year starter, the Ravens are banking on Queen’s foot speed to outrun any rookie mistakes.
2 (55) J.K. Dobbins5’9 209
RB/Ohio State
45/2nd Round This was an interesting selection. Sure it looks good to have another RB in the mix, but where does his insertion into the rotation leave Gus Edwards (back-to-back 700-yard campaigns) and Justice Hill (2019 4th -round pick).
3 (71) Justin Madubuike6’3 293
DT/Texas A&M
30/2nd Round For a DT with just 9-inch hands, Madubuike certainly overpowered a number of OL in school. His biggest weakness actually revolves around hand placement. He was flagged for four facemask penalties in 2018.
3 (92)Devin Duvernay5’10 202
WR/Texas
/3rd Round Duvernay’s breakout 2019 season featured increased understanding of the position. He has flashed as an outside receiver as well. If he can begin to use his strength more on the outside lanes, there are possibilities for multiple roles.
3 (98)Malik Harrison6’3 247
LB/Ohio State
18/2nd Round Harrison fits more of the 1980s profile for exchange LBs. His eyes have often taken him where he needs to get but he left some plays on the field. His coverage capability will either make him a starter or solid backup.
3 (106) Tyre Phillips6’5 331
OG/Mississippi State
273 /4th Round
The collegiate left tackle more than held his own as the Bulldogs blindside protector in 2019. During the postseason, he displayed starting capability as a guard. Either way, his presence (84 5/8-inch wingspan) gives the Ravens one of the bigger offensive lines in the league.
4 (143)Ben Bredeson6’5 310
OG/Michigan
125/3rd RoundBredeson plays balanced and completes a large majority of his assignments. His latch needs to improve when sustaining blocks. Bredeson was the rare junior team captain in the Jim Harbaugh-era at Michigan.
5 (170)
Broderick Washington
6’3 305
DT/Texas Tech
374/5th Round
Washington has enough quickness to play the four-technique in three-man fronts, three-technique in four-man fronts and occasional one-technique DT. He is heavy-handed and durable (37 straight starts to end career).


Baltimore Ravens third-round pick Tyre Phillips (seen pictured in the 2019 Music City Bowl) starred at the LT spot in college for the Bulldogs. The Ravens could possibly use him at guard, where he played well in the postseason all-star circuit.
6 (201) James Proche  5’11 201
WR/SMU
119/3rd Round
Proche caught 301 passes for 3,949 yards for an eye-popping 39 TDs in school. He excelled at making the acrobatic catch in school but also has outstanding strength (20 reps-225 lbs.).
7 (219) Geno Stone 5’10 207
S/Iowa
266/4th RoundThe junior-entry has enough instincts to play a nickel linebacker spot in school. He carries a number of similarities to former Tennessee Titans fourth-round pick Amani Hooker in terms of size, responsibility in school and play speed. He will have to make an impact on special teams to make the final roster.
Cincinnati Bengals  Notable pick:  The Bengals have a number of weapons available at Burrow’s disposal. The most important -RB Joe Mixon- can serve the role of Burrow’s Clyde Edwards-Helaire at LSU. Burrow may just be the QB to take advantage of Mixon’s skill-set.
Round, Selection,
Player Position/School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1)Joe Burrow6’3 221
QB-LSU
15/2nd Round Burrow’s quick decision-making will be asked to ramp up early in a division that may be competitive down to the last week of the season. He excelled in spread sets as a senior and expect the Bengals to incorporate plenty of those concepts.
2 (33) Tee Higgins 6’4 216
WR-Clemson
33/2nd Round A.J. Green’s long-term prospects with the team is uncertain. Higgins’ long arms and deceptive running style carry similarities to Green’s and the two would be a viable pair to complement John Ross and Tyler Boyd.
3 (65) Logan Wilson6’2 241
LB-Wyoming
27/2nd Round Wilson -a former star high school DB- recorded 10 interceptions in college and was a magnet chasing plays down sideways. If he can improve his initial footwork, he should be able to compete early in an underrated LB corps.
4 (107) Akeem Davis-Gaither6’2 224
LB-Appalachian State
85/2nd Round It could be argued that Davis-Gaither fits the LB room as good -if not better- than Wilson. He was one of the more impressive LBs during the postseason and his on-field range stands out week-to-week.
5 (147)Khalid Kareem 6’4 268 OLB/DE-Notre Dame172/4th Round Kareem is a power rusher with positive awareness to affect the passing game once his rush has been stopped. He has experience rushing from a four-point, three-point or two-point stance.
6 (180)
Hakeem Adeniji
6’4 302
OG/OT-Kansas
89/3rd RoundOne of the most durable OL in the draft, Adeniji made starts at LG, RT and LT in school. He needs to improve versus line games, but exhibited quickness and explosiveness in school.
7 (215)
Marcus Bailey
6’1 235
LB-Purdue
309/5th Round
If not for durability concerns during his career, Bailey would likely have gone much higher in the draft. He finished his career with 327 tackles and 28 TFLs.
Cincinnati Bengals sixth-round pick Hakeem Adeniji started 48 straight games for Kansas during his career.
Cleveland Browns   Notable pick:  The team has been looking for a consistent left tackle it seems since Baker Mayfield entered the lineup. Although Wills, Jr. protected the blindside for Tua Tagovailoa, it was from the right side. How he adjusts to the other side will determine the Browns success in 2020.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (10) Jedrick Wills, Jr. 6’4 312
OT-Alabama
3/1st RoundWills, Jr. continued to improve what was already satisfactory hand placement in 2019. The penalties were a problem. For a team that had its issues with those in 2019, it must be something they address with him early in the season.
2 (44) Grant Delpit6’2 213
S-LSU
50/2nd Round Perhaps no prospect was as mystifying as Delpit. The 2019 Jim Thorpe Award winner missed so many tackles during his award-winning year that injuries were given as part of the problem. Either way, he will have to make the one-on-one tackles in a bruising division. If he can live up to the task, then his athleticism should shine getting off of the hash marks.
3 (88) Jordan Elliott6’4 302
DT-Missouri
121/3rd Round Elliott was probably most effective when the team clearly defined his responsibilities. He is a positional-flex candidate with quickness and a slippery nature.
3 (97) Jacob Phillips6’3 229
LB-LSU
160/3rd Round He can slide effectively for a taller LB and actually sink to tackle. Phillips does take an extra step or two to get in-and-out of transition. As he grows into his role for the team, making positive weight gains could help his cause.
4 (115)Harrison Bryant 6’5 243
TE-FAU
114 /3rd Round Bryant went to a team that may use him in two TE sets quite a bit of the time. With David Njoku’s injury history a subject of concern, Bryant may get an opportunity sooner than later.
5 (160) Nick Harris6’1 302
OC-Washington
166/3rd Round Harris will get the opportunity to become the team’s eighth OL on game day with the new NFL rules allowing for two more OL to suit up on game day. His mobility could add layers to the Browns offense.
6 (187)Donovan Peoples-Jones6’2 212
All-purpose-Michigan
168/4th Round The former Michigan Gatorade Player of the Year was an underrated punt returner in school and routinely made some spectacular adjustments on difficult catches. Rounding out his consistency could give him a chance to make the team.
Cleveland Browns first-round pick Jedrick Wills, Jr. frequently handled the blindside protection for Alabama QB Tua Tagovailoa.
Pittsburgh Steelers  Notable picks:  McFarland may seem like a pick to simply add a different element, but if 2018 is any indication, he could steal valuable playing time from a number of quality RBs in front of him on the depth chart.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (49)Chase Claypool 6’4 238
All-purpose/
Notre Dame
23/2nd Round We were trying to find a way to put into perspective the number of special teams plays Claypool made while at Notre Dame (25 tackles). But those plays only amplify some of his high-wire body control full extension grabs. He gets stronger as the season progresses.
3 (102)Alex Highsmith
6’3 247
OLB-Charlotte
170/4th RoundConsistent three-year starter with non-stop energy. He reacts well to counter OTs, but his tendency to leave his feet as a pass rusher is something the team may look to adjust early in training camp.
4 (124)Anthony McFarland 5’8 208
B-Maryland
120/3rd RoundMcFarland’s home run gear will add a jolt to the Steelers offense not seen since the days of Willie Parker.
4 (135)Kevin Dotson6’4 310
OG-Louisiana Lafayette
178/4th Round
Standing 6-foot-4 with 10 1/2-inch hands, Dotson does not have a lot of bulk in the lower body. Instead, he wins with solid hat-and-hand placement on a down-to-down basis. His length gives him a chance to keep pass rushers at bay on the interior.
6 (198)
Antoine Brooks 5’11 220
S/LB-Maryland
77/2nd Round
There’s not much Maryland did on the football field defensively without Brooks in mind. Over the course of his stay in school, he was used at LB, nickel, safety and on the punt team. Brooks contains an outstanding feel for working through tight spaces to make tackles.

7 (232)

Carlos Davis
6’2 314
DT-Nebraska
237/4th Round
The two-sport athlete was a second-team All-American in the discus. On the football field, he is an effective two-gap defender who needs to improve his balance.
Pittsburgh Steelers second-round pick Chase Claypool averaged 15.7 yards per reception with 13 TDs for Notre Dame in 2019.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC West

Denver Broncos  Notable pick: Muti was unable to stay healthy in either of his final two seasons, but the former college LT has the footwork to demand a look during training camp.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (15)
Jerry Jeudy
6’1 193
WR-Alabama
22/2nd Round Jeudy’s ability to run through the reception should immediately make him a highly targeted threat in the Broncos ever-evolving offensive scheme. QB Drew Lock is very accurate on skinny posts into the middle of the field, and that is a route (along with the quick slant) that Jeudy excelled on during school.
2 (46) K.J. Hamler
5’9 178
WR-Penn State
63/2nd Round Hamler has a different level of speed of anyone else in the Broncos receiving corps. In an attempt to get him the ball, the Nittany Lions moved him around quite a bit, but there is no doubt that the team could use him on the outside on vertical concepts. He may have gone higher if he had been able to workout for scouts prior to the draft.
3 (77) Michael Ojemudia
6’1 200
CB-Iowa
215/4th Round Ojemudia certainly increased his level of play as a senior. Since his days as a high school safety, he has always been physical. In fact, the Hawkeyes matched him on different personnel in 2018 (inside) to take advantage of his size in coverage.
3 (83) Lloyd Cushenberry
6’3 312
OC-LSU
24/2nd Round Cushenberry should be able for a job at any of the three interior line positions. Although he was our top-ranked center, there are little doubts about his ability to transition to a guard spot.
3 (95) McTelvin Agim
6’3 309
DT-Arkansas
159/3rd Round Agim started his career as a multi-dimensional DE/DT for the Razorbacks but he eventually just grew into the defensive tackle spot. His quickness and ability to gain an edge on opponents should make him a good fit as a four-technique DE for the Broncos.
4 (118)Albert Okwuegbunam
6’5 260
TE-Missouri
174/4th RoundOkwuegbunam never exactly played to his workout numbers in school, but that doesn’t mean he was not a field-stretching presence. His Red Zone productivity was evident (23 career TDs). Although he improved as a blocker, the team frequently used him more in an H-back/FB type of role within their offense. He may take targets away from Noah Fant due to his relationship with QB Drew Lock.
5 (178)Justin Strnad
6’3 238
LB-Wake Forest
190/4th Round Strnad was one of the more active LBs in the ACC the last two seasons and proved his worth in coverage. He may start out on special teams, but he could compete for a backup role in nickel packages at LB.
6 (181)Netane Muti
6’3 315
OG-Fresno State
134/3rd Round Where would Muti have gone had he been able to stay healthy in either of his final two seasons. That point is debatable, but what is not up for debate is the aggression he plays the game with down-to-down. His technical deficiencies surround a tendency to dip his head when latching.
7 (252)
Tyrie Cleveland
6’2 209
WR-Florida
249/4th Round
Cleveland flashed as a downfield threat, gunner and kickoff returner in school. His best chance to make the team will be to upend former CFL star Diontae Spencer for the KR role. It won’t be an easy task.
7 (254)
Derrick Tuszka
6’4 247
DE-OLB-North Dakota State
235/4th Round
Tuszka is effective on the move or getting out of his three-point stance. There were even times when the Bison would use him inside (DT) on third downs. His energy gives him an outside chance of making the team despite entering a crowded OLB room.
Denver Broncos first-round pick Jerry Jeudy -the 2018 Biletnikoff Award Winner- averaged 17.2 yards per reception with 26 receiving TDs in his career.
Kansas City Chiefs  Notable pick: Sneed is the type of developmental prospect that the Chiefs have traditionally loved to take over the years. His 4.37 speed will be used most effectively in man coverage. The team will need him to locate the ball down the field but his profile fits their defensive scheme.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (32) Clyde Edwards-Helaire5’7 207
RB-LSU
68/2nd Round Edwards-Helaire runs option routes, pops off of tacklers in-or-out of the box and competes in every phase of the game. The Chiefs will have a plan for his skill set.
2 (63)Willie Gay, Jr.6’2 243
LB-Mississippi State
21/2nd Round Gay, Jr. was arguably the most explosive LB in this year’s draft class. A litany of suspensions and games missed in 2019 did him no favors. The fact that he remained an integral part of nearly every special teams unit, however, speaks to his football character.
3 (96)Lucas Niang6’6 315
OT-TCU
133/3rd Round Niang is long, relatively light on his feet and aggressive. It can be argued that he was perhaps more impressive as a run blocker.
4 (138) L’Jarius Sneed6’1 192
CB-Louisiana Tech
283/4th Round Sneed didn’t look the part consistently at safety and part of that was due to an uneven feel for the position. What he did do a very good job of was competing in man coverage, which seems to be his favorite thing to do.
5 (177) Michael Danna6’2 261/
DE-Michigan, CMU
345/4th RoundDanna moved in-and-out of a number of line spots for Michigan after standing out as an edge defender at CMU. His power and explosiveness stood out in the postseason.
7 (237)Thakarius “BoPete” Keyes6’1 202/CB-Tulane220/4th RoundKeyes has length, patience and positive foot speed. DC Jack Curtis challenged him over a three-year period in loads of man-to-man coverage and he responded favorably.
Kansas City Chiefs fourth-round pick L’Jarius Sneed ran a 4.37 40-yd dash, had a 41″ VJ and went 10’11” in the broad jump at the 2020 NFL Combine. Sneed returned three of his eight career interceptions for touchdowns while at Louisiana Tech.
Las Vegas Raiders  Notable pick: If Robertson produces anywhere near the level of his collegiate productivity, then the Raiders will get at least a viable nickel back candidate. His toughness is exemplary, but his wrap tackling was inconsistent in school.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (12) Henry Ruggs III 5’11 188
WR-Alabama
43/2nd Round
Ruggs was arguably one of the better kickoff and punt cover guys in the country (17 tackles in career). Aside from starring in those roles, he stood out with his field speed on downfield routes and after the catch.
1 (19) Damon Arnette 6’0 195 
CB-Ohio State
56/2nd Round Arnette’s physical playing style didn’t dissipate while playing with a broken hand in 2019. In fact, it could be argued that he took his game to another level. His style fits that of a classic Raiders DB.
3 (80) Lynn Bowden, Jr. 5’11 203
All-Purpose Kentucky
118/3rd Round Bowden will have to be located if used in a number of ways, which may in fact be the plan in Las Vegas. If there was ever a player worth hitting the jackpot on in Round 3, then the all-purpose SEC standout fits the bill.
3 (81) Bryan Edwards 6’3 212 WR-South Carolina 61/2nd Round
While we talked about the Raiders potentially hitting the lottery in Round 3 earlier, they may have doubled down with the selection of Edwards. South Carolina’s all-time leader in receptions is smooth, fast and contains outstanding spatial awareness on the field.
3 (100) Tanner Muse 6’2 227 S-Clemson 313/5th Round
Muse was Clemson’s Special Teams Player of the Year back in 2016 and took his game to another level each year. His speed was on display when he ran down Ohio State RB J.K. Dobbins in the 2019 CFP semifinal to save a TD.
4 (109) John Simpson  6’4 321
OG-Clemson
101/3rd Round
Simpson has the burly build and overall wrestling-type background make him tough to get away from once latched. He was the first Clemson offensive lineman selected since 2014.
4 (139) Amik Robertson 5’8 187
CB-Louisiana Tech
66/2nd Round
Robertson’s production speaks for itself. During his time in Ruston, the former Bulldog notched 14 INTs (265 yds, 3 TDs) and 34 PBUs. In addition, he posted 23.5 tackles for losses.
Las Vegas Raiders first-round pick Damon Arnette was an active four-year contributor for the Buckeyes at the cornerback spot, but he also saw time at nickel back in 2019.
Los Angeles Chargers  Notable pick: The Chargers already have Austin Ekeler and Justin Jackson in the fold and they typically have used a running back by committee approach. If Kelley is going to penetrate the lineup, then his ability to get the grind it out yardage is the route.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (6) Justin Herbert6’6 238
QB-Oregon
13/1st Round Herbert’s physical skills often outpaced his decision-making but he began to learn how to win the tough games as a senior. Staying in school to get more repetitions proved to be the right decision for the former Duck. Can he eventually compete with the high-octane offenses developing within the division?
1 (23)Kenneth Murray6’1 241
LB-Oklahoma
28/2nd RoundMurray improved dramatically in Alex Grinch’s defensive scheme in 2019. His discipline improved but his activity (155 tackles in 2018) largely remained the same.
4 (112)Joshua Kelley5’10 214
RB-UCLA, UC-Davis
92/3rd Round Kelley used a strong postseason to backup his solid production while at UCLA. His vision may be his strongest asset. Although he wasn’t used much in the passing game, he displays potential as a receiving threat.
5 (151)Joe Reed6’0 223 All-purpose-Virginia149/3rd Round Reed was used in the screen game to almost serve as an extra RB in 2019. This came a year after averaging nearly 19 yards per catch. His real value comes in the return game.
6 (186)Alohi Gilman5’10 202
S-Notre Dame, Navy
183/4th Round Gilman may be quicker than fast but his play speed stands out. While at Navy, he displayed tremendous timing as a blitzer. His eye speed is outstanding for the position but his effort has stood out on both the punt and kickoff cover units.
7 (220)K.J. Hill6’0 196
WR-Ohio State
194/4th Round Hill had the occasional concentration lapse, but his feel for setting up defenders is without a doubt one of his better characteristics as a route runner. He is strong enough to handle the inside duty of being a slot receiver.
After arriving from the Naval Academy, Los Angeles Chargers sixth-round pick Alohi Gilman posted 94 tackles, 3 TFLs, 2 FFs, 2 INTs and 5 PBUs for the Fighting Irish in 2018.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC East

Buffalo Bills  Notable pick: Bills HC Sean McDermott has had success with bigger defensive ends and Epenesa could add to the trend. The team needs him to produce. They lost both Jordan Phillips (Cardinals) and Shaq Lawson (Dolphins) in the offseason. The pair accounted for 16 of the team’s 44 sacks in 2019.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (54)A.J. Epenesa6’5 275 DE-Iowa29/2nd Round Epenesa’s technical prowess overcomes just okay burst off the edge. The former U.S. Army All-American brings outstanding size to the table.
3 (86) Zack Moss5’10 226 RB-Utah62/2nd Round Moss is the prototype strong runner for inclement weather in December and January. His health has always been his biggest knock.
4 (128)Gabriel Davis6’2 216
WR-UCF
115/3rd Round Davis’ deceptive gait and unorthodox style accompanies a 6-foot-2, 216-pound frame. He proved adept on double moves and boxing out the opposition in school.
5 (167) Jake Fromm 6’2 219
QB-Georgia
111/3rd Round Fromm finished his career with an impressive 78:18 TD/INT ratio. If he can handle the windy conditions of Buffalo, he may be able to compete to backup incumbent starter Josh Allen. Davis Webb and Matt Barkley are also in the mix, so there are no guarantees for Fromm.
6 (188)Tyler Bass 6’0 200
PK-Georgia Southern
380/5th RoundGame-winning kicks have been a part of Bass’ portfolio in school. He was also pretty good in rainy weather. The weather he is about to face is going to be an entirely new challenge, but his strong leg may be up to the task.
6 (207)
Isaiah Hodgins
6’4 210
WR-Oregon State
80/2nd Round
Like Davis, Hodgins isn’t necessarily flashy but efficient. The 6-foot-4 wideout is smooth getting in-and-out of patterns and can make the contested catch. To make the team, he needs to play stronger versus physical coverage.

7 (239)
Dane Jackson6’0 187
CB-Pittsburgh
207/4th Round
Jackson is smart, tough and generally fluid. Despite weighting in the 185-pound range, he could get looks at a nickel spot if he cannot keep up with speed on the edge. The team’s coverage style gives him a chance to make the team.
Moss rushed for over 4,000 yards (4,067) and scored 41 touchdowns in school.
Miami DolphinsNotable pick: Hunt did not get to show off his impressive physical tools in the postseason. He is a mammoth tackle with positive movement and the right temperament to surprise early in an NFL training camp.


Round, Selection,PlayerSchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNasty’ Take:
1 (5)Tua Tagovailoa6’0 217 QB-Alabama37/2nd RoundThis pick is as much about long-term upside as it is 2020. With Ryan Fitzpatrick back, (as well as Josh Rosen), the team does not have to rush Tagovailoa into the mix. Fans yearning to see the former Heisman finalist could speed up the process.
1 (18)Austin Jackson6’5 322 OT-USC61/2nd RoundJackson legitimately was one of the most athletic offensive or defensive lineman in this year’s draft class. Getting his technique under control will be key. If he makes a big step in training camp, it would not be a shock to see him as an opening day starter.
1 (30)Noah Igbinoghene5’10 198 CB/All-purpose-Auburn157/3rd RoundOne of Igbinoghene’s best characteristics -kickoff return capability- may not be needed unless KR Jakeem Grant goes down to injury (as he did late last season). Where he will be needed is in nickel defenses, where he will battle current third corner Cordrea Tankersley (also returning from injury) for playing time.
2 (39)Robert Hunt6’5 323 OT-Louisiana-Lafayette103/3rd RoundHunt has made starts at LG, LT and RT. His near 11-inch hands deliver decisive punches to the opposition. He is also capable of surprising second-level LBs with his quickness on combination blocks. He has starting capability early in his career, but his durability came into question in 2019.
2 (56)Raekwon Davis6’7 311 DT-Alabama76/2nd RoundThe former Crimson Tide defensive stalwart was never a slippery defender, but he did find a way to notch 8.5 QB sacks back in 2017.  He is more of a stack-and-shed two-gap defender with enough strength to be an effective part of the team’s rotation in 2020.
3 (70)Brandon Jones5’11 198 S-Texas123/3rd RoundJones was a team leader, active tackler and decent punt returner in school. He does not carry a big frame but throws his body around. The big question concerning Jones will be his ability to stay upright with his style of play.
4 (111)Solomon Kindley6’3 337 OG-Georgia284/4th RoundKindley reinforces the belief that the Dolphins will continue to commit big athletic bodies to its offensive line. The former three-star recruit is a grappler with the right mentality to send messages in the run game. He was a big factor in the ‘Dawgs physical running attack.
5 (154)Jason Strowbridge6’5 275 DE-North Carolina165/3rd RoundStrowbridge’s upper body movements are well-synchronized when he times snap counts. He is more fluid than one would expect at 275 pounds, and he projects favorably in the multiple fronts the Dolphins will employ week-to-week.
5 (164)Curtis Weaver6’2 265 DE-Boise State75/2nd RoundWeaver’s underwhelming physical traits may have caused a precipitous slide in the draft, but his skill at flipping his hips resulted in ascending sack production each year in school. He has to improve defending the run.
6 (185)Blake Ferguson6’3 229 LS-LSU573/7th RoundFerguson- the nation’s No. 1 long snapper coming out of high school- more than lived up to his recruiting hype. The two-time team captain is capable of speeding up his long snaps versus pressure looks.
7 (246)Malcolm Perry5’9 186 All-Purpose-Navy277/4th RoundPerry rushed for over 2,000 yards as an option quarterback in 2019, but he earned plenty of repetitions for the Midshipmen as a slot back and WR during his career. Aside from averaging 21.4 yards per catch on 22 receptions, he also averaged 24.6 yards per kickoff return.
Miami Dolphins fifth-round pick Curtis Weaver finished his career as the all-time leader in sacks (34) in Mountain West Conference history.
New England Patriots  Notable pick:  Jennings didn’t dominate rushing the passer in school, but he did dominate in other ways. His 18 pass breakups are an eye-opening total for an outside linebacker.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (37) Kyle Dugger 6’1 217
S-Lenoir-Rhyne
36/2nd Round Dugger has all of the tools to develop into a multi-purpose weapon for the Patriots defense. If needed, he can play linebacker, a big nickel, off the hash safety and even return kicks. As the team continues to redefine its size in the secondary, the former Division II All-American seems like the perfect fit.
2 (60)Josh Uche6’1 245
LB-Michigan
70/2nd Round For a player as talented as Uche, he didn’t play as much as one would have expected at Michigan. When he did finally hit the field full-time in 2019, the physical skills stood out.
3 (87)Anfernee Jennings6’2 256
OLB-Alabama
107/3rd Round Jennings brings more versatility to the table than some anticipate and his hand-eye coordination is elite. While not a finished product as a pass rusher, he has an innate feel for rushing from multiple spots.
3 (91) Devin Asiasi6’3 257
TE-UCLA
197/4th RoundAsiasi averaged 104 receiving yard per game in the last three games of ihs career at UCLA. He is capable of working the seams of the field.
3 (101) Dalton Keene6’4 253
TE-Virginia Tech
137/3rd Round As Keene improved as a blocker, his receiving skills did not diminish. He has handled a number of his blocking assignments on the move. His straight-line speed and upside after the catch ranks as a positive for the Patriots.
5 (159)
Justin Rohrwasser
6’3 230
PK-Marshall
N/A
Rohrwasser’s leg strength is adequate but his accuracy (just nine missed field goals in two years) was perhaps more impressive. Most of his misses during school came in the latter portion of seasons. He is capable of placing the ball directionally on kickoffs.
6 (182)
Michael Onwenu
6’3 344
Michigan
203/4th Round
A true road-grading offensive guard with power, Onwenu’s 11-inch hands are hard to get away from once he gains grasp of the opponent. The former DL has the mindset to dominate opponents, but he has to keep his weight under control.
6 (195)
Justin Herron
6’4 308
OG-Wake Forest
151/3rd Round
Herron- a collegiate left tackle- impressed during the 2020 Senior Bowl with his work at offensive guard. He provides the team with positional flex capability due to outstanding feet.
6 (204)
Caash Maluia
6’0 248
LB-Wyoming
N/A
Maluia is thick enough to handle being uncovered, and he was a four-year contributor in a number of facets for the Cowboys.
7 (230)
Dustin Woodard
6’2 291
OC-Memphis
478/6th Round
The team has had success with smaller offensive guards and centers in the past. The reason? Mobility. Woodard was effective on the move as a puller way back in 2016, when he played guard.
New England Patriots sixth-round pick Cassh Maluia posted seven tackles for loss and intercepted two passes for the Cowboys in 2019.
New York Jets  Notable picks:  Davis brings capability to the Jets in multi-dimensional nickel packages. If he can play off the hash, then the Jets will be able to move around multi-dimensional safety Jamal Adams even more down-to-down.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (11) Mekhi Becton6’7 364
OT-Louisville
1/1st Round Becton will be tasked with the huge responsibility of keeping starting QB Sam Darnold comfortable in the pocket. If he can execute the task, then he could soon be a Pro Bowler.
2 (59) Denzel Mims6’3 207
WR-Baylor
42/2nd RoundMims may not have gone as high as he would have liked to go in the draft, but he now has a legitimate chance to turn into a team’s top receiving threat early in his career. He is a good alternative in the current lineup of Jets receivers.
3 (68) Ashtyn Davis6’1 202
S-Cal
99/3rd RoundDavis’ foot speed shined as a kickoff returner and when running down plays in pursuit. One of the best things he did at Cal was disguise coverage in a scheme that has some similarities to the Jets.
3 (79)Jabari Zuniga6’3 253
DE-Florida
182/4th Round While Zuniga did move around effectively in school on a number of downs, he is going to get every opportunity to do some work from a stand-up or three-point position in Gregg Williams’ multitude of defensive looks. Staying healthy, which he didn’t do in 2019, is a big key.
4 (120)Lamical Perine5’11 216
RB-Florida
146/3rd RoundPerine’s tools include the ability to catch the ball out of the backfield effortlessly. Combined with his hard-charging style, he could become a nice change-up for Le’Veon Bell.

4 (125)
James Morgan
6’4 228
QB-FIU

127/3rd Round
Morgan’s mental aptitude is perhaps on par with his physical tools. His arm strength gives him a legitimate opportunity to battle David Fales for the team’s backup spot.

4 (129)
Cameron Clark
6’4 308
OT-Charlotte
126/3rd Round
The two-time team captain and 35-game starter is an impressive run blocker who is still growing as a pass protector. The 6-foot-4-inch tackle has 11-inch hands and an 83-inch wingspan. We think he can backup at least four spots on the offensive line while competing for a starting spot at guard.
5 (158)
Bryce Hall
6’1 202
CB-Virginia
105/3rd Round
Hall’s instincts as a corner are first-rate but he wasn’t able to answer the questions about recovery speed in the postseason due to still recovering from midseason surgery on a broken fibula. The effectiveness of his playing style will depend on his eye control.
6 (191)
Braden Mann
5’11 198
P-Texas A&M
335/5th Round
His spiral punts get into the 70-yard distances when he gets hold of punts and his hang times have gotten into the 4.8-second range in the film viewed. A good athlete, Mann saved a TD on a kickoff return by Alabama’s Henry Ruggs III in 2019 and posted seven tackles this past season. Mann has to get better as a directional punter.
New York Jets second-round pick Denzel Mims posted 1,000-yard receiving seasons in two of his final three seasons at Baylor.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC South

Houston Texans  Notable pick: The team drafted Tytus Howard in the first round a season ago and recently re-signed Laremy Tunsil to an extension. Thus the selection of former UNC OT Charlie Heck means the team is seeking quality depth on the edges. At 6-foot-8, can he provide depth at OG?
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (40) acquired from ArizonaRoss Blacklock6’4 290
DT-TCU
47/2nd Round Blacklock’s quickness and natural agility shined in his 2019 return from injury. The former Big 12 co-Freshman of the Year regained his form and provides the Texans with the ability to play two-to-three different positions down-to-down.
3 (90) Jonathan Greenard
6’3 262 DE-Florida129/3rd Round Greenard (VIDEO) played with his hand in the dirt or from a two-point standup position in school. This fits the scheme-diverse system the Texans employ.
4 (126) Charlie Heck6’7 311
OT-UNC
78/2nd Round Heck (VIDEO) benefited from a solid postseason and strong pre-draft workouts. The big key for Heck will be sitting in the chair.
4 (141) Acquired from Miami John Reid5’10 187
CB-NB-
Penn State
70/2nd round Reid is the latest in the line of Penn State defensive backs to get an opportunity in the NFL. The former four-star recruit from St. Joseph’s Prep School (Pa.) got his hand on 33 passes during his career.
5 (171)  Isaiah Coulter6’2 198
WR-Rhode Island
98/3rd Round Coulter -a junior-entry- improved his draft stock by running in the mid-4.4s at the 2020 NFL Combine. He is fluid in-and-out of routes.
Indianapolis Colts  Notable pick: In our estimation, Blackmon (VIDEO) was the Utes’ top defensive back over the course of the last two seasons. If he can recover adequately from a late season ACL tear, this pick could provide long-term dividends.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (34) from WashingtonMichael Pittman, Jr.6’4 223
WR-USC
74/2nd Round Pittman (VIDEO) has a unique combination of size and physical skills. Quite capable of competing in either the slot or the outside lanes. Over 2,500 receiving yards and 17 tackles on special teams.
2 (41) from ClevelandJonathan Taylor5’11 226
RB-Wisconsin
26/2nd RoundTaylor’s ball security issues have been well-documented but he did improve markedly as a receiver out of the backfield in 2019. One of the more impressive areas of his development was the potential he showed in the screen game.
3 (85) from Detroit through ClevelandJulian Blackmon6’0 187
S-Utah
106/3rd Round Blackmon was an All-Pac-12 caliber cornerback before making a smooth transition to the safety spot. Aside from the late season injury, he needed to do a more consistent job of monitoring his angles off the hash. Overall, a very good prospect.
4 (122) Jacob Eason6’5 229
QB-Washington, Georgia
69/2nd Round Eason’s lukewarm performance during his one year at Washington didn’t do much to extinguish the flames of those who felt he needed another year in school. He did have some success at Georgia. Learning from Philip Rivers could be the recipe for the former five-star recruit.
5 (149)Danny Pinter6’4 302
OG-Ball State
97/3rd Round Pinter played well versus NC State in 2019 and those types of performances went a long way in him getting drafted here. He fits the team’s scheme.
6 (193)Robert Windsor 6’4 290
DT-Penn State
234/4th Round Windsor provides options as a third down pass rusher. If he can clean up some balance issues, he has a chance to make the roster.
6 (211)
Isaiah Rodgers
5’10 175
CB/All-purpose-UMass
269/4th Round
Rodgers ran in the high 4.2-to-low 4.3-range in a virtual Pro Day leading up to the draft. His work on the field reading routes and returning kicks was largely just as impressive. Needs to make weight gains.
6 (212)
Dezmon Patmon
6’4 228
WR-Washington State
184/4th Round
Patmon is a physical wide receiver with a big frame, solid speed and decent quickness off the line of scrimmage. Concentration lapses foiled him at times. 12 career starts.
Former USC WR Michael Pittman was a terror on special teams during his time as a Trojan. In 2019, he caught 111 passes for 1,275 yards and 11 touchdowns.
6 (213)Jordan Glasgow6’0 220 S/LB-Michigan429/5th RoundGlasgow’s value continued to trend in an upward manner for the Wolverines over a two-year period. His ability to blitz is complemented by excellent special teams capability.
Jacksonville Jaguars  Notable pick:  The team is building a diverse set of cornerbacks, many of whom have quality size. Scott (5’9 185) -the team’s fourth-round selection- could provide options as a nickel back due to his willingness to mix it up as a tackler.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (9) C.J. Henderson6’1 204
CB-Florida
9/1st Round Henderson’s ball skills and ability to transition effectively in-and-out of his breaks made him a Top 10 pick. He has true No. 1 cornerback capability for a team that relied on Jalen Ramsey in that role for the better part of three seasons.
1 (20)K’Lavon
Chaisson
6’3 254
DE-LSU
86/2nd Round Injury concerns aside, Chaisson can turn into a surfer off the edge with his bend. He did more than just rush the passer at LSU. Chaisson was at least adequate when dropping into coverage.
2 (42)Laviska Shenault, Jr. 6’1 227
WR-Colorado
87/2nd Round The Jaguars will look for Shenault, Jr. (in-game report, 10-6-18) to fill a number of roles on their football team in 2020. Much like he did at Colorado, expect to see him in the backfield, the slot and on the outside.
3 (73)Davon Hamilton6’4 320
DT-Ohio State
152/3rd RoundHamilton has always shown strength at the point of attack, but he went a long way in 2019 of proving that he can perhaps develop into a competent pass rush artist. The Jaguars continue to diversify its defensive front.
4 (116)
Ben Bartch
6’6 310
OT-St. John’s (MN.)
164/3rd Round
Due to sub-standard length, Bartch will most likely get looks at an inside guard spot. The former tight end provides potential as a sixth or seventh offensive lineman on game day because he is a capable tackle.
4 (137)
Josiah Scott 5’9 185
CB-Michigan State

226/4th Round
Scott’s ability to mirror wide receivers in off-man coverage offset concerns about injury issues that surfaced in each of his first two years on campus. He started all 13 games as a junior.
4 (140)
Shaquille Quarterman6’1 234
LB-Miami (Fla.)
51/2nd Round
Quarterman’s leadership capability has been influenced by mentor and former first-round pick Jon Beason (Panthers, Giants).
5 (157)
Daniel Thomas
5’10 215
S-
Auburn
314/5th Round
Thomas plays with energy and closes ground on the field quickly; particularly when breaking forward on the action. He is strong, explosive and capable of filling a role as an eighth man in the box. Special teams production will determine if he earns a roster spot.
Former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault, Jr. (pictured scoring vs. USC in 2019), rushed for seven touchdowns over the last two seasons. The Jaguars will look to get him involved in a number of ways this fall.
5 (165)
Collin Johnson
6’6 222
WR-Texas
138/3rd Round
To get a receiver with Johnson’s potential in Round 5 is a huge win for the team. If he can avoid the minor injury hiccups that seemed to stop him at times from truly becoming a dominant player, then the former Longhorn has a chance to make the roster. He is going to a team with a relatively deep receiving corps.
6 (189)
Jake Luton
6’6 224
QB-Oregon State, Idaho
232/4th Round
Luton has starting-caliber size, arm strength and toughness. The 2019 Mayo Clinic Comeback Player of the Year narrowly missed leading the Beavers to a bowl berth in 2019.
6 (206)
Tyler Davis
6’4 235
TE-Georgia Tech, UConn
N/A
Davis began his career as a big wide receiver at UConn and displayed excellent Red Zone capability as an outside receiver dating back to 2018 (see ECU ’18). He settled down at Georgia Tech in 2019.
7 (223)
Chris Claybrooks
6’0 176
CB/KR-Memphis
N/A
Despite playing in just nine games this past season, Claybrooks was explosive in the kickoff return game, averaged nearly 31 yards on 11 returns.
Tennessee Titans  Notable pick: Evans’ work ethic should not be dismissed. He shaved nearly a half-second off of his 100-meter time in high school in one year. Not only can he factor in the kickoff return game,
he also is outstanding in the screen game.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Isaiah Wilson6’6 350
OT-Georgia
96/3rd Round Wilson served as perhaps the biggest Wildcat QB in the history of prep level football and once scored three touchdowns in a game. An improving pass blocker, he will provide immediate returns as a run blocker.
2 (61) Kristian Fulton6’0 201
CB-LSU
91/3rd Round Fulton, a physical outside corner, allows the team to experiment with a number of different looks in their nickel/dime packages.
3 (93)Darrynton Evans5’10 203
All-purpose-Appalachian State
173/4th Round Evans could prove to the perfect change-of-pace runner to give Derrick Henry a breather during games. He contributed over 4,600 all-purpose yards in school.
5 (174)Larell Murchison6’2 294
DT-NC State
44/2nd Round If you’re wondering why a player with a higher grade lasts this far, it is simple. Bunch production. Too much of Murchison’s productivity over a two-year period came in spots. His technique will be challenged by the Titans staff and the results could pay huge dividends. Effort is not the issue.
7 (224)Cole McDonald 6’3 215216/4th RoundMcDonald’s inconsistency led to a benching at one point during the year. He has all of the tools a team desires in a backup and his size/athleticism closely mirrors that of Ryan Tannehill when he came out of school.
7 (243)Chris Jackson6’0 185
CB-Marshall
316/5th RoundJackson’s competitiveness ranks at the top of his characteristics board. He contains a short memory after getting beaten. It doesn’t hurt that he got his hands on 52 passes during school (seven interceptions). The two-time Florida state champion hurdler enjoys man coverage.
Tennessee Titans third-round pick Darrynton Evans (No. 19 pictured in the 2016 Raycom Media Camelia Bowl, now wears No. 3) put up 20 repetitions at 225 pounds during the 2020 NFL Combine. He is a relentless worker who finished his career with 34 TDs three different ways (25 RUSH, 6 REC, 3 RET).

Jacksonville Jaguars WR Laviska Shenault, Jr.: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 42nd overall

Former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault, Jr. brings a burly, strong build to the receiver position. In 2018, he cleared the 1,000-yard barrier on 86 receptions. Over the last two seasons, Shenault, Jr. has rushed for seven touchdowns in a variety of ways. Frequently, the team would put him in the Wildcat quarterback position during school. The Jaguars have plenty of options with the native Texan.

Q&A with former Utah State PK Dominik Eberle: “It’s always about the next kick”

Former Utah State kicker Dominick Eberle set a new Mountain West Conference all-time mark for field goals when he hit four goals versus Wyoming in 2019. He also aced a game-winning field goal against Fresno State in 2019. Despite being a Lou Groza Award finalist in 2017, he dealt with a career-defining low point in the 2017 Arizona Bowl. DraftNasty’s Corey Chavous caught up with Eberle during the week of the 2020 East-West Shrine Bowl to talk about redemption, technique and confidence.

Corey: I want to take you to a game a couple years back. The Arizona Bowl (2017). That game. What did you feel like it did for you….the learning experience? Talk about that moment and how you built from that.
Eberle: That moment is something where I truly felt like I let my teammates down. I felt like I didn’t perform to the best of my abilities and it wasn’t gonna be something that I was gonna be remembered for. That was gonna be something where it has happened, but the learning experience from that, really challenging myself to whatever accolades came before that didn’t matter, because that was the last game I had played in. So I really wanted to make sure that that bitter taste out of my mouth kinda came out of that. Because just through hard work, really focusing on what I can do better and what I can control, that was something that I learned a lot from it and wanted to just consistently improve on every single day. And those are the lessons that you need as a kicker. You need to be mentally tough, you need to be able to just focus on the next kick because what happened doesn’t matter anymore. It shapes who you are but it doesn’t matter anymore. It’s always about the next kick. And that’s kind of the mentality that I took this year as well. It doesn’t matter if I made three field goals already, the fourth one, the next one is really the one I focused on. Just taking it one kick at a time.

Utah State’s Dominik Eberle made 79-percent of his field goals in school and never missed an extra point.

Corey: I think you were like 18-of-22 (16-of-18) going into that game (2017 Arizona Bowl) or something like that. It was kind of crazy just how efficient you had been. Big reason the team was even in the bowl game, right? But did you find yourself punching at the ball in that game? What was it technically that you learned from it?
Eberle: From that game, I was wrapping around the ball a lot. If you look at the seam, I was hitting so far on the right seam where even though I had distance on it, it was just kind of shoot off your foot with a weird left rotation and spin out to the left of the upright. And that’s what I did on three of the field goals that game. And the very last one, I really just punched at it, it went right, hit the upright. That’s something where I looked at it where it was sometimes just trusting your technique isn’t enough. Sometimes you’ve gotta be really able to not revamp it, but add certain things that can help you. So what I did going into the next season (2018) was really following through straight and using my momentum, similar to Justin Tucker’s, to carry myself through the ball straight and have my hips pointing right at my target. That’s something that I worked with cone drills, just kicking the ball into the net. And that’s something where every single day I’m kinda working at that getting that consistency right through my target.

Corey: And talk a little bit about that. For placekickers, the target line is a big deal. That target line is really where you’re trying to get the ball to and in that sense, that’s really what you’re talking about from an explanation standpoint, right?
Eberle: Exactly. For us, when we’re facing our building side right between the S and T or the K and the S for Maverik Stadium (Merlin Olsen Field at Maverik Stadium, Utah State’s home field), small little gap. That’s something we’re always aiming at. It’s high up and everybody can see it and that’s my target line. So whenever I hit in that Allstate Hands (kicking net) or something, right down my target line. That’s something I always focus on in practice, whether it’s here (Tropicana Field, East-West Shrine Bowl), when I’m looking above you can kinda see the Tropicana Field. That’s something where I’m aiming at and really know if my ball is truly where I was gonna hit it.

Corey: One of the best kickers in Mountain West history. If there is one thing you feel good about translating the next level what would it be? In terms of moving forward to the next level. You’ve kicked off, are you going to be a touchback kicker in the NFL?
Eberle: I can certainly improve on kickoffs. The scheme was different this year (2019) than it was last year (2018: 64-percent touchback percentage). We tried to play the ball around a little bit more, steal a possession here or there, so my touchback percentages might of not have been near as similar…

Utah State PK Dominik Eberle, pictured, became the sixth player in NCAA history to kick three 50-yard field goals when he connected on three 51-yarders versus New Mexico State in 2018.

Corey: Sky kicks.
Eberle: Exactly. Sky kicks, little pooch kicks.

Corey: Hang times to sometimes get a fair catch?
Eberle: Exactly. So that was kinda what we were working with this year rather than just telling me to boot the ball out of the end zone. I know I can do that but I’m more of a team player. Realizing against LSU we had a little pooch kick over to about the 30-yard line where we knew the guy wasn’t experienced catching the ball and maybe steal a fumble. So we pooched the ball over and he fumbled it but he recovered it rather than us. That is where I realized that can just as much of a weapon as just kicking the ball out of the end zone.

Corey: You talked about Justin Tucker (Baltimore Ravens) earlier, who were some of the other kickers that you study at the NFL level with some of those technique we were talking about?
Eberle: Shayne Graham (15-year NFL veteran with 14 teams) would be one as well. He was really consistent. He was someone that when I first was learning to become a kicker was still playing in the league. He was with the Bengals at the time, bounced around with the Saints and everything. I was watching him and how smooth he sometimes appeared where it looked effortless. Will Lutz (New Orleans Saints) as well, he has incredible ball-striking ability. That’s something I want to learn from him. And just Adam Vinatieri (Patriots, Colts). The more you read about him or hear stories about him, he had that killer instinct in the fourth quarter. He was so in the zone that you knew he wasn’t going to miss.

Corey: Thanks a lot for your time and best of luck in the draft.
Eberle: Thanks a lot.

Q&A with former Miami (Fla.) LB Shaq Quarterman: “From start to finish”

Former Miami (Fla.) linebacker Shaquille Quarterman -a four-time All-ACC selection at linebacker- finished his storied career with 356 tackles, ninth all-time in school history. In 2019, Quarterman became the only Hurricane to start 52 consecutive games without missing a start. DraftNasty editor-in-chief Corey Chavous caught up with Quarterman during the week of the 2020 East-West Shrine Bowl. They talked about why finishing was an important part of his legacy. Quaterman modeled his game after his idol, a former Hurricanes linebacker and NFL first round pick who currently serves as his mentor.

Corey: First, I’d like to ask how do you think the week has gone for you so far?
Quarterman: I think the week has progressed for me very well. First day of pads, I already knew it was knocking off the dust. Not for just me, but everybody out here. As it gets better, people get more comfortable, you get to see who really can play. So today I felt like it was night and day from my first day. I just feel like as the week keeps going I’m going to get even better.

Corey: We actually shot your last bowl game (2019 Independence Bowl). A lot of your teammates made the decision not to play in that game. For you, as a team captain, one of the things that you talked about was just how important that last game was to you. Ended that game with 11 tackles. Even though it was a little bit of a debilitating loss, your defense played well. Talk about how you felt about finishing the right way.
Quarterman: I’m a man of principle. I really stick to my principles and morals. I could not have my team out there and feel like they’re better off without me because I wanted to go train just a couple of days early. That’s not the way I want to set a standard. That’s all I’ve ever talked about was the standard. It’s not bailing on your team, because I love my guys and they made their decisions for why they made their decisions. But I’m a team guy, that’s all it is. I couldn’t be on the sidelines and then I was thinking about going but that makes it worse. I’m going to play with my team.

Corey: Right.
Quarterman: 55 is going to lead his team out there. I never folded. I never did that.

Quarterman (No. 55 pictured) finished his career with 356 tackles, 12 quarterback sacks, 46.5 tackles for loss, an interception and 13 passes defensed.

Corey: Our notes on you surround the ability to stack-and-shed. That is one of the things that is a little bit underrated in your game. Talk about why that is important to you…using your hands as a linebacker.
Quarterman: Because that’s how you’ve got to survive in the league (NFL). In college, you can still get away with being more athletic than a lot of guys. But at the next level, that margin of error is cut drastically shorter. You have to be able to do a lot of things to survive. It’s about longevity. The standard career time is already like 2.3 years, so if I can’t use my hands as a linebacker I don’t see how I’m going to see the field. And that’s just being honest. Because it’s a business, it’s about producing. I undertand that. That was one of my critiques last year, so this year I knew I had to work on that. I knew I had to put it on tape multiple times. Like you said, I put it on tape, but it’s very underrated. So I’ve got to change something about me to make it not underrated.

Corey: Now if there’s a question the scouts are asking you when you talk to them. What’s the biggest question they have for you the rest of the postseason? Certainly you’re coming down here this week dispelling any questions they may have. What do you hear the most?
Quarterman: It’s always about my ability to play in space. I’ve been in the box so long at Miami, so good at playing the run, that my coaches didn’t have to worry about that. So if you don’t have to worry about one spot, you can find pieces around him that could play the pass.

Corey: Absolutely.
Quarterman: So I was never groomed for my pass coverage basically. That’s why those question marks exist.

Corey: And they had you coming forward a lot.
Quarterman: Right.

Corey: The tackles for loss weren’t just this year, they were a year ago as well.
Quarterman: Exactly.

Corey: Run blitzes, timing run blitzes.
Quarterman: They just let me do what I do best. And I understand that. But now I’m in a position where I’ve got to show people that I can do the other side of the spectrum.

Corey: And how have you felt that has gone out here (East-West Shrine week)?
Quarterman: The first day was rusty. Today, a whole 180. I didn’t win a single one-on-one yesterday, and I didn’t lose one today.

Corey: That’s awesome man.
Quarterman: Yes sir.

Corey: The tradition at your school is pretty deep at the linebacker position. But if there is a player, even beyond Miami (Fla.), that you’ve looked up to from the NFL perspective -either presently or in the past- who would that be? .
Quarterman: Jon Beason (10-year NFL veteran, former Miami (Fla.) linebacker-2007 NFL Draft, 1st Round, 25th overall, Carolina Panthers). That’s my mentor, man.

Corey: Wow. Really good player.
Quarterman: That’s my mentor. I want to play like him. I still watch his tapes. He let me get a hold of his tapes, so I still watch him. We’re almost built the same. I’m a little taller than him, but as soon as I stepped on campus they talked about our neck sizes and stuff like that. I just love the way he plays the game. I try to do everything that he would do and beyond. Because he did everything the right way. He played through injuries and all that. To have a chance to go to Miami (Fla.) and meet your idol and have him mentor you. And take you underneath his wing and see that he sees it in you. It’s something different. It’s a lot of weight on that.

Quarterman (No. 55 pictured) played the entire 2017 season with a torn left AC joint and finished that year with 83 tackles, 2.5 QB sacks, 7 TFLs and 5 PBUs.

Corey: Four-year starter at Miami from your true freshman year on. The meaning of that?
Quarterman: It’s different. It’s hard. Very difficult. I just really thank Coach Richt and Coach Diaz for trusting in me. It takes a lot to put a true freshman out there…at any position in college football. I really appreciate that. I tried to uphold it as long as I could.

Corey: Well, man, good luck and continue the tradition. I know you gotta get outta here. Nice to meet you. Enjoyed watching you throughout your career.
Quarterman: I appreciate that.

Indianapolis Colts WR Michael Pittman: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 34th overall

Aside from torching Pac-12 defenses for 171 receptions for 2,549 yards (14.7 YPR) and 19 touchdowns, former USC wide receiver Michael Pittman, Jr. also found time to post 17 tackles and blocked three kicks. In addition, he returned one punt for a score. Similar to his father, Michael, Sr., he is a true all-purpose threat on the football field.