Category Archives: AFC South

2021 NFL Draft Recap: AFC South

The AFC South’s 2021 NFL Draft featured a new quarterback in Houston, a new cover corner in Tennessee and a pass rusher for the Colts. Kwity Paye and Caleb Farley will be expected to provide immediate dividends for the Texans and Titans. In Jacksonville, new head coach Urban Meyer brought two former teammates back together in hopes of reinvigorating the fan base.

Houston Texans      
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
3rd Round, 67th overallHouston TexansDavis Mills6’4 225/ QB-Houston166/3rd RoundThe trend of injuries dates back to his high school days, where he was once ranked ahead of Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa in 247Sports’ 2017 rankings. So what does he bring to the table? Mills is an inexperienced quarterback with a smooth delivery, good mobility and an even-keeled nature. That calm in the face of the storm helped him deliver after falling behind in games as a junior.
3rd Round, 89th overallHouston Texans (from Cleveland Browns)Nico Collins6’4 215/WR-Michigan157/3rd RoundAbove all else, it is his tremendous high-wire acts that grabbed the attention of scouts. In order to maximize those flurries of splashes, Collins has to play with more attention to detail.
5th Round, 147th overallHouston TexansBrevin Jordan6’3 247/TE-H-back-Miami (Fla.)66/2nd RoundHe has operated as a fullback, flexed-out slot receiver, outside receiver, down tight end and even off the ball tight end. Injuries may have caused his draft slide.
5th Round, 170th overallHouston Texans (via Jacksonville Jaguars from Cleveland Browns)Garret Wallow6’2 220/LB-TCU120/3rd RoundThere is little wasted motion and he fires his frame downhill in a burst that is reminiscent of a gun fighter in an old Western movie. His quick-twitch reactions also show up in the passing game to get into position versus quick route concepts
6th Round, 195th overallHouston Texans (from Dallas Cowboys through New England Patriots)Roy Lopez6’2 304/DT-Arizona, New Mexico State462/6th RoundLopez, a former state heavyweight wrestling champ, was a factor creasing gaps throughout two different stops. He finished with 23.5 career tackles for loss. 36 bench press reps at 225 pounds on his Pro Day.
Indianapolis Colts
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 21st overallIndianapolis ColtsKwity Paye6’3 270 DE-Michigan9/1st RoundPaye was one of the draft’s best run defenders and he should get better as a pass rusher. With all of that said, however, the Colts need him to be a front line player from Day 1 on a roster that no longer features Justin Houston.
2nd Round, 54th overallIndianapolis ColtsDayo Odeyingbo6’5 285/DE-Vanderbilt52/2nd RoundA recent Achilles injury may hold back his draft stock, but the Colts went ahead and took a chance on Odeyingbo, who could end up as one of the best players in this year’s draft class. Their defense may allow them to sit him for a redshirt year while he recovers. His profile is similar to Colts DL DeForest Buckner.
4th Round, 127th overallIndianapolis ColtsKylen Granson6’2 245/H-back/SMU307/4th RoundThose run after the catch skills were apparent at SMU whenever he got the ball in his hands. He actually may have been faster with the ball in his hands than when running routes. A viable NFL comparison could be drawn to NFL free agent H-back/fullback Trey Burton (Eagles, Bears, Colts).
5th Round, 165th overallIndianapolis ColtsShawn Davis5’10 199/S-Florida318/4th RoundDavis is a well-built, muscular safety who brings a load down-to-down as a hitter. He can tend to play a step too fast and not break down consistently in space. We think his play speed is adequate and it allows him to overcome any lower body stiffness.
6th Round, 218th overallIndianapolis Colts (from New Orleans Saints via compensatory selection)Sam Ehlinger6'1 222 QB-Texas304/4th RoundOver the course of his career, he has improved his accuracy. Ehlinger’s adequate arm strength is offset by inconsistent footwork. Speeding up the efficiency of his drops could help timing on possession route concepts. To earmark Ehlinger’s effectiveness as a goal line runner, look no further than his production against Oklahoma in his career. In those contests alone, he rushed for nine touchdowns.
7th Round, 229th overallIndianapolis Colts (from New Orleans Saints via Jacksonville Jaguars)Michael Strachan6’5 226/WR-Charleston (West Virginia)237/4th RoundThe Division II All-American tends to get choppy in-and-out of his routes while counting some of his steps. Those are the technical flaws, but he gives an NFL wide receivers coach plenty to work with this summer. One possibility that could be intriguing is moving Strachan to an H-back position.
Jacksonville Jaguars
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
1st Round, 1st overallJacksonville JaguarsTrevor LawrenceQB-Clemson5/1st RoundLawrence's underrated athleticism works for an offense that already features a 1,000-yard rusher and two 1,000-yard receivers.
1st Round, 25th overallJacksonville JaguarsTravis Etienne5’10 215/RB-Clemson22/1st RoundEtienne re-unites with Trevor Lawrence in what could prove to be a game-changing backfield combination. He will team with James Robinson for a powerful one-two punch.
2nd Round, 33rd overallJacksonville JaguarsTyson Campbell6’2 194/CB-Georgia126/3rd RoundA big corner with good foot speed and at least satisfactory quickness. His balance is a characteristic that needs to improve.
2nd Round, 45th overallJacksonville JaguarsWalker Little6’7 313/OT-Stanford167/3rd RoundLittle has not played for a two-year period. When he was on the field, his smooth nature stood out. Rarely did he get overwhelmed with the pace of the defensive end. Can he stay healthy?
3rd Round, 65th overallJacksonville JaguarsAndre Cisco6'0 203/FS-Syracuse54/2nd RoundThe fact that he can make a number of tough tackles hides some of the flaws on the makable misses. Nevertheless, his middle of the field instincts and overall activity are similar to former Wake Forest safety Jessie Bates (Cincinnati Bengals). Due to the ACL knee injury he suffered in October, his final draft position does not reflect his overall value.
4th Round, 106th overallJacksonville JaguarsJay Tufele6’2 305/DT-USC75/2nd RoundTufele is a strong player. We have even noted repetitions where he overpowered guards to make tackles when he didn’t even get lined up prior to the snap (3rd QTR/11:07, Colorado ‘19). Versus double teams, he works to defeat one blocker to prevent the chip from the other blocker.
4th Round, 121st overallJacksonville JaguarsJordan SmithDE-OLB/UAB, Florida 185/3rd RoundFluidity at his size. Rushes from the two-point ROLB/LOLB spots and has lined up at both defensive end spots. Plays the Sam in a number of their packages. He was one of the C-USA’s best players for a two-year period and still found time to run down on kickoffs after off the field issues at Florida.
5th Round, 145th overallJacksonville JaguarsLuke Farrell6’6 250 (E)-TE-Ohio State377/5th RoundFarrell is a player who accepted his role in school and did it with a good amount of attitude as a blocker. He aligned at a number of spots, moved in motion and was asked to block both in-line and in space.
6th Round, 209th overallJacksonville Jaguars (from Los Angeles Rams)Jalen Camp6’2 226/WR-Georgia Tech199/4th RoundMuscular. 33 3/4” arms. Reportedly bench presses 400 pounds and squats nearly 550 pounds. Stride length can get on top of CBs in the move area. His one-hand grab vs. Alcorn State in 2018 showed his catch radius.
Tennessee Titans
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPositionSchoolNotes
1st Round, 22nd overallTennessee TitansCaleb Farley6’2 207 CB-Virginia Tech17/1st RoundOne of the draft’s most talented corners has ball skills, instincts and health concerns. His skills fit Tennessee’s defensive
2nd Round, 53rd overallTennessee TitansDillon Radunz6’6 300/OT-North Dakota State50/2nd RoundHe has worked on keeping a bent posture over the last year, and this despite appearing in just one game in 2020. There were never any question marks regarding the All-American’s pace, foot speed, or quickness.
3rd Round, 92nd overallTennessee Titans (from Green Bay Packers)Monty Rice6’0 235/LB-Georgia93/3rd RoundThere were still the flash outstanding athletic plays from Rice in 2020 (see Tennessee), but a nagging foot injury hampered his effectiveness for stretches. The overall range and speed in his play are both in place. Rice plays a little bit narrow in his stance and tends to get too thick versus offensive linemen.
3rd Round, 100th overall Tennessee TitansElijah Molden5'9 1/2" 192/Nickel-Washington74-2nd RoundNumbers may not tell the entire story for Molden, who seems to be a player capable of filling a myriad of roles for an NFL defense. Despite being primarily a nickel back during school (even on first/second down), there are possibilities for him working off the hash.
Molden has very good quickness, change of direction and elite eye speed.
4th Round, 109th overallTennessee Titans (from Houston Texans via Carolina)Dez Fitzpatrick6'2 204/WR-Louisville244/4th RoundFitzpatrick helped himself with a second-team All-ACC performance as a senior. His career was full of big moments sprinkled in spots. In fact, he was one of Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson’s favorite targets all the way back in 2017.
4th Round, 135th overallTennessee Titans (from Green Bay Packers)Rashad Weaver6’4 265/DE-Pittsburgh122/3rd RoundIt is impressive that he was able to come back from a knee injury with so much success in one year. We expect him to be a step quicker by the fall. The consensus All-American has somewhat of an unorthodox style in that his initial hand usage sets up his counter moves.
6th Round, 205th overallTennessee TitansRacey McMath6’2 224/WR-H-back-LSU329/5th RoundFormer TE moved to WR and never really was able to fully cut loose with his 4.4 speed. He was seen running down on kickoffs at inside positions, played gunner in school on the punt team and was used as a hold-up blocker on punt return.
6th Round, 215th overallTennessee Titans (from Kansas City Chiefs)Brady Breeze5’11 204/S-Oregon336/5th RoundWhen discussing Oregon’s talented secondary, Breeze is often the player forgotten about. It is hard to believe considering he was the team’s Defensive MVP in the 2020 Rose Bowl. The first thing teams will like about Breeze is the energy he plays with snap-to-snap. Breeze overcomes any rigidness with his play speed.

2021 NFL Free Agency, Live Updates: AFC South

The AFC South features two new head coaches and potentially three new signal-callers heading in 2021. How is each team stacking up heading into the 2021 NFL Draft? Please come back day-to-day as we will provide live updates on each of your favorite teams.

AFC South

Tennessee Titans

Offensive free agents

WR Adam Humphries

WR Corey Davis (Agreed to terms with the Jets)

TE MyCole Pruitt

LT Marshall Newhouse

RB Senorise Perry

TE Geoff Swaim (re-signed)

TE Jonnu Smith (Agreed to terms with Patriots)

RB D’Onta Foreman

WR Kalif Raymond

TE Anthony Firkser

FB Khari Blasingame

Defensive free agents

DE Jadeveon Clowney

CB Malcolm Butler

DT DaQuan Jones

S Kenny Vaccaro

DT Jack Crawford

LB Daren Bates

LB Nick Dzubnar

LB Will Compton

CB Breon Borders (re-signed)

CB Tye Smith

CB Desmond King

LB Jayon Brown

DT Matt Dickerson

S Joshua Kalu

DE Tuzar Skipper (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Re-signed CB Breon Borders, DE Tuzar Skipper, TE Geoff Swaim, K Tucker McCann
  • Released CB Adoree Jackson, OT Dennis Kelly
  • Agreed to terms with OLB Bud Dupree (Steelers) on a multi-year deal, DE Denico Autry (Colts) on three-year deal, LT Kendall Lamm (Browns), DE Davin Bellamy (Texans), CB Janoris Jenkins (Saints)
  • Lost WR Corey Davis (Jets), TE Jonnu Smith (Patriots)
  • Traded 2020 first-round pick OT Isaiah Wilson and a 202 seventh-round pick to the Miami Dolphins for a 2021 seventh-round pick

Houston Texans

Offensive free agents

RB David Johnson (re-signed)

C Nick Martin

RB Duke Johnson

QB A.J. McCarron

WR Will Fuller

RG Senio Kelemete

LT Roderick Johnson

QB Josh McCown

RT Brent Qvale

TE Pharaoh Brown (re-signed)

RB Dontrell Hilliard (re-signed)

FB Cullen Gillaspia (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

RB Buddy Howell (re-signed)

C Greg Mancz (Agreed to terms with Ravens)

Defensive free agents

DE J.J. Watt (Agreed to terms with Cardinals)

DE Brennan Scarlett

CB Gareon Conley

LB Dylan Cole

CB Vernon Hargreaves

CB Phillip Gaines

S Michael Thomas

LB Tyrell Adams

LB Kyle Emanuel

DT P.J. Hall (re-signed)

DT Carlos Watkins (Agreed to terms with the Cowboys)

CB Mark Fields (Agreed to terms with 49ers)

DT Eddie Vanderdoes

DE Peter Kalambayi

CB Cornell Armstrong (re-signed)

S Geno Stone

CB A.J. Moore (re-signed)

DE Davin Bellamy (Agreed to terms with Titans)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Traded LB Bernardrick McKinney to Miami for DE Shaq Lawson and swapped draft picks in the fourth, fifth and sixth rounds in a trade with New England for OL Marcus Cannon
  • Agreed to terms with QB Tyrod Taylor (Chargers) on a one-year deal, WR Andre Roberts (Bills), WR Chris Moore (Ravens), RB Mark Ingram (Ravens), DT Maleik Collins (Raiders), LB Kamu Grugier-Hill (Dolphins), LB Kevin Pierre-Louis (WFT), LB Joe Thomas (Cowboys), G Justin McCray (Falcons), CB Terrance Mitchell (Browns), CB Tremon Smith (Colts), FS Terrance Brooks (Patriots), DT Vincent Taylor (Browns), OLB Derek Rivers (Rams)
  • Re-signed RB David Johnson, DT P.J. Hall, RB Dontrell Hilliard, RB Buddy Howell, CB Cornell Armstrong, CB A.J. Moore
  • Lost OC Greg Mancz (Ravens), DE Davin Bellamy (Titans), CB Mark Fields (49ers), FB Cullen Gillaspia (Giants), DT Carlos Watkins (Cowboys)
  • Released DE J.J. Watt (Cardinals)

Jacksonville Jaguars

Offensive free agents

TE Tyler Eifert

WR Keelan Cole

WR Chris Conley

LT Cam Robinson (Franchised)

C Tyler Shatley (re-signed)

RB Chris Thompson

QB Mike Glennon (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

TE James O’Shaughnessy (re-signed)

TE Eric Saubert

WR Dede Westbrook

RB Dare Ogunbowale (re-signed)

RG Derwin Gray (re-signed)

Defensive free agents

CB D.J. Hayden

DT Abry Jones

DE Aaron Lynch

DE Dawuane Smoot (re-signed)

DT Caraun Reid

DE Adam Gotsis

CB Greg Mabin

CB Sidney Jones (re-signed)

CB Rashaan Melvin (Agreed to terms with the Panthers)

DT Daniel Ross

S Josh Jones

CB Tre Herndon (re-signed)

LB Dakota Allen (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with CB Shaquill Griffin (Seahawks) on a three-year deal, DE Roy Robertson-Harris (Bears) on a four-year deal, DE Jihad Ward (Ravens), RB Carlos Hyde (Seahawks) on a two-year deal, WR Marvin Jones, Jr. (Lions) on a two-year deal, S Rayshawn Jenkins (Chargers) on a four-year deal, S Johnathan Ford (Eagles), DL Tyson Alualu (Steelers) on a two-year deal, WR Phillip Dorsett II (Seahawks), TE Chris Manhertz (Panthers), KR Jamal Agnew (Lions), LB Chappelle Russell (Buccaneers)
  • Re-signed CB Sidney Jones, DE Dawuane Smoot, RG Derwin Gray, RB Dare Ogunbowale, C Tyler Shatley, LB Dakota Allen
  • Traded for New Orleans Saints DT Malcom Brown (Saints)
  • Lost QB Mike Glennon (Giants), CB Rashaan Melvin (Panthers)

Indianapolis Colts

Offensive free agents

QB Jacoby Brissett (Agreed to terms with Dolphins)

QB Philip Rivers (Retired)

WR T.Y. Hilton

RT Le’Raven Clark

C Joey Hunt

TE Trey Burton

LT Chaz Green

WR Zach Pascal (re-signed)

TE Mo Alie-Cox (re-signed)

RB Marlon Mack (re-signed)

WR Ashton Dulin (re-signed)

Defensive free agents

DE Justin Houston

DE Denico Autry (Agreed to terms with the Titans)

S Malik Hooker

CB Xavier Rhodes

S Tavon Wilson

CB T.J. Carrie

DT Taylor Stallworth (re-signed)

CB Tremon Smith (Agreed to terms with the Texans)

LB Anthony Walker Jr.

DE Al-Quadin Muhammad

S George Odum (re-signed)

2021 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Traded a 2021 third-round pick, a 2022 conditional second-round draft pick for QB Carson Wentz (Eagles)
  • Re-signed WR Zach Pascal, S George Odum
  • Lost QB Jacoby Brissett (Dolphins), QB Philip Rivers (retired), DE Denico Autry (Titans), CB Tremon Smith (Texans)

DraftNasty Throwback (circa 2014): Oklahoma State’s Tyreek Hill vs. FSU’s Jalen Ramsey

On August 30, 2014, the Florida State Seminoles squared off against the Oklahoma State Cowboys in the Advocare Classic. The result? A hard-fought 37-31 victory for the top-ranked Seminoles. The game within the game featured two future NFL All-Pros matching up at different positions then they would eventually star at in the NFL. At the time, current Kansas City WR Tyreek Hill was a running back/return specialist and Los Angeles Rams CB Jalen Ramsey was starring in a safety/nickel back role. In what proved to be a precursor for the future, Hill tallied an incredible total of 278 all-purpose yards. Ramsey contributed 12 tackles and 1/2 tackle for loss, while displaying outstanding agility and body control. We go inside one of college football’s best matchups of the past decade.

Hill (No. 24 pictured) was used in a myriad of ways during the matchup with the Seminoles, but Ramsey’s responsibilities (No. 8 covering Hill out of the backfield) varied quite a bit during the day as well.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC South

Houston Texans  Notable pick: The team drafted Tytus Howard in the first round a season ago and recently re-signed Laremy Tunsil to an extension. Thus the selection of former UNC OT Charlie Heck means the team is seeking quality depth on the edges. At 6-foot-8, can he provide depth at OG?
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (40) acquired from ArizonaRoss Blacklock6’4 290
DT-TCU
47/2nd Round Blacklock’s quickness and natural agility shined in his 2019 return from injury. The former Big 12 co-Freshman of the Year regained his form and provides the Texans with the ability to play two-to-three different positions down-to-down.
3 (90) Jonathan Greenard
6’3 262 DE-Florida129/3rd Round Greenard (VIDEO) played with his hand in the dirt or from a two-point standup position in school. This fits the scheme-diverse system the Texans employ.
4 (126) Charlie Heck6’7 311
OT-UNC
78/2nd Round Heck (VIDEO) benefited from a solid postseason and strong pre-draft workouts. The big key for Heck will be sitting in the chair.
4 (141) Acquired from Miami John Reid5’10 187
CB-NB-
Penn State
70/2nd round Reid is the latest in the line of Penn State defensive backs to get an opportunity in the NFL. The former four-star recruit from St. Joseph’s Prep School (Pa.) got his hand on 33 passes during his career.
5 (171)  Isaiah Coulter6’2 198
WR-Rhode Island
98/3rd Round Coulter -a junior-entry- improved his draft stock by running in the mid-4.4s at the 2020 NFL Combine. He is fluid in-and-out of routes.
Indianapolis Colts  Notable pick: In our estimation, Blackmon (VIDEO) was the Utes’ top defensive back over the course of the last two seasons. If he can recover adequately from a late season ACL tear, this pick could provide long-term dividends.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (34) from WashingtonMichael Pittman, Jr.6’4 223
WR-USC
74/2nd Round Pittman (VIDEO) has a unique combination of size and physical skills. Quite capable of competing in either the slot or the outside lanes. Over 2,500 receiving yards and 17 tackles on special teams.
2 (41) from ClevelandJonathan Taylor5’11 226
RB-Wisconsin
26/2nd RoundTaylor’s ball security issues have been well-documented but he did improve markedly as a receiver out of the backfield in 2019. One of the more impressive areas of his development was the potential he showed in the screen game.
3 (85) from Detroit through ClevelandJulian Blackmon6’0 187
S-Utah
106/3rd Round Blackmon was an All-Pac-12 caliber cornerback before making a smooth transition to the safety spot. Aside from the late season injury, he needed to do a more consistent job of monitoring his angles off the hash. Overall, a very good prospect.
4 (122) Jacob Eason6’5 229
QB-Washington, Georgia
69/2nd Round Eason’s lukewarm performance during his one year at Washington didn’t do much to extinguish the flames of those who felt he needed another year in school. He did have some success at Georgia. Learning from Philip Rivers could be the recipe for the former five-star recruit.
5 (149)Danny Pinter6’4 302
OG-Ball State
97/3rd Round Pinter played well versus NC State in 2019 and those types of performances went a long way in him getting drafted here. He fits the team’s scheme.
6 (193)Robert Windsor 6’4 290
DT-Penn State
234/4th Round Windsor provides options as a third down pass rusher. If he can clean up some balance issues, he has a chance to make the roster.
6 (211)
Isaiah Rodgers
5’10 175
CB/All-purpose-UMass
269/4th Round
Rodgers ran in the high 4.2-to-low 4.3-range in a virtual Pro Day leading up to the draft. His work on the field reading routes and returning kicks was largely just as impressive. Needs to make weight gains.
6 (212)
Dezmon Patmon
6’4 228
WR-Washington State
184/4th Round
Patmon is a physical wide receiver with a big frame, solid speed and decent quickness off the line of scrimmage. Concentration lapses foiled him at times. 12 career starts.
Former USC WR Michael Pittman was a terror on special teams during his time as a Trojan. In 2019, he caught 111 passes for 1,275 yards and 11 touchdowns.
6 (213)Jordan Glasgow6’0 220 S/LB-Michigan429/5th RoundGlasgow’s value continued to trend in an upward manner for the Wolverines over a two-year period. His ability to blitz is complemented by excellent special teams capability.
Jacksonville Jaguars  Notable pick:  The team is building a diverse set of cornerbacks, many of whom have quality size. Scott (5’9 185) -the team’s fourth-round selection- could provide options as a nickel back due to his willingness to mix it up as a tackler.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (9) C.J. Henderson6’1 204
CB-Florida
9/1st Round Henderson’s ball skills and ability to transition effectively in-and-out of his breaks made him a Top 10 pick. He has true No. 1 cornerback capability for a team that relied on Jalen Ramsey in that role for the better part of three seasons.
1 (20)K’Lavon
Chaisson
6’3 254
DE-LSU
86/2nd Round Injury concerns aside, Chaisson can turn into a surfer off the edge with his bend. He did more than just rush the passer at LSU. Chaisson was at least adequate when dropping into coverage.
2 (42)Laviska Shenault, Jr. 6’1 227
WR-Colorado
87/2nd Round The Jaguars will look for Shenault, Jr. (in-game report, 10-6-18) to fill a number of roles on their football team in 2020. Much like he did at Colorado, expect to see him in the backfield, the slot and on the outside.
3 (73)Davon Hamilton6’4 320
DT-Ohio State
152/3rd RoundHamilton has always shown strength at the point of attack, but he went a long way in 2019 of proving that he can perhaps develop into a competent pass rush artist. The Jaguars continue to diversify its defensive front.
4 (116)
Ben Bartch
6’6 310
OT-St. John’s (MN.)
164/3rd Round
Due to sub-standard length, Bartch will most likely get looks at an inside guard spot. The former tight end provides potential as a sixth or seventh offensive lineman on game day because he is a capable tackle.
4 (137)
Josiah Scott 5’9 185
CB-Michigan State

226/4th Round
Scott’s ability to mirror wide receivers in off-man coverage offset concerns about injury issues that surfaced in each of his first two years on campus. He started all 13 games as a junior.
4 (140)
Shaquille Quarterman6’1 234
LB-Miami (Fla.)
51/2nd Round
Quarterman’s leadership capability has been influenced by mentor and former first-round pick Jon Beason (Panthers, Giants).
5 (157)
Daniel Thomas
5’10 215
S-
Auburn
314/5th Round
Thomas plays with energy and closes ground on the field quickly; particularly when breaking forward on the action. He is strong, explosive and capable of filling a role as an eighth man in the box. Special teams production will determine if he earns a roster spot.
Former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault, Jr. (pictured scoring vs. USC in 2019), rushed for seven touchdowns over the last two seasons. The Jaguars will look to get him involved in a number of ways this fall.
5 (165)
Collin Johnson
6’6 222
WR-Texas
138/3rd Round
To get a receiver with Johnson’s potential in Round 5 is a huge win for the team. If he can avoid the minor injury hiccups that seemed to stop him at times from truly becoming a dominant player, then the former Longhorn has a chance to make the roster. He is going to a team with a relatively deep receiving corps.
6 (189)
Jake Luton
6’6 224
QB-Oregon State, Idaho
232/4th Round
Luton has starting-caliber size, arm strength and toughness. The 2019 Mayo Clinic Comeback Player of the Year narrowly missed leading the Beavers to a bowl berth in 2019.
6 (206)
Tyler Davis
6’4 235
TE-Georgia Tech, UConn
N/A
Davis began his career as a big wide receiver at UConn and displayed excellent Red Zone capability as an outside receiver dating back to 2018 (see ECU ’18). He settled down at Georgia Tech in 2019.
7 (223)
Chris Claybrooks
6’0 176
CB/KR-Memphis
N/A
Despite playing in just nine games this past season, Claybrooks was explosive in the kickoff return game, averaged nearly 31 yards on 11 returns.
Tennessee Titans  Notable pick: Evans’ work ethic should not be dismissed. He shaved nearly a half-second off of his 100-meter time in high school in one year. Not only can he factor in the kickoff return game,
he also is outstanding in the screen game.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Isaiah Wilson6’6 350
OT-Georgia
96/3rd Round Wilson served as perhaps the biggest Wildcat QB in the history of prep level football and once scored three touchdowns in a game. An improving pass blocker, he will provide immediate returns as a run blocker.
2 (61) Kristian Fulton6’0 201
CB-LSU
91/3rd Round Fulton, a physical outside corner, allows the team to experiment with a number of different looks in their nickel/dime packages.
3 (93)Darrynton Evans5’10 203
All-purpose-Appalachian State
173/4th Round Evans could prove to the perfect change-of-pace runner to give Derrick Henry a breather during games. He contributed over 4,600 all-purpose yards in school.
5 (174)Larell Murchison6’2 294
DT-NC State
44/2nd Round If you’re wondering why a player with a higher grade lasts this far, it is simple. Bunch production. Too much of Murchison’s productivity over a two-year period came in spots. His technique will be challenged by the Titans staff and the results could pay huge dividends. Effort is not the issue.
7 (224)Cole McDonald 6’3 215216/4th RoundMcDonald’s inconsistency led to a benching at one point during the year. He has all of the tools a team desires in a backup and his size/athleticism closely mirrors that of Ryan Tannehill when he came out of school.
7 (243)Chris Jackson6’0 185
CB-Marshall
316/5th RoundJackson’s competitiveness ranks at the top of his characteristics board. He contains a short memory after getting beaten. It doesn’t hurt that he got his hands on 52 passes during school (seven interceptions). The two-time Florida state champion hurdler enjoys man coverage.
Tennessee Titans third-round pick Darrynton Evans (No. 19 pictured in the 2016 Raycom Media Camelia Bowl, now wears No. 3) put up 20 repetitions at 225 pounds during the 2020 NFL Combine. He is a relentless worker who finished his career with 34 TDs three different ways (25 RUSH, 6 REC, 3 RET).

Jacksonville Jaguars WR Laviska Shenault, Jr.: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 42nd overall

Former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault, Jr. brings a burly, strong build to the receiver position. In 2018, he cleared the 1,000-yard barrier on 86 receptions. Over the last two seasons, Shenault, Jr. has rushed for seven touchdowns in a variety of ways. Frequently, the team would put him in the Wildcat quarterback position during school. The Jaguars have plenty of options with the native Texan.

Q&A with former Miami (Fla.) LB Shaq Quarterman: “From start to finish”

Former Miami (Fla.) linebacker Shaquille Quarterman -a four-time All-ACC selection at linebacker- finished his storied career with 356 tackles, ninth all-time in school history. In 2019, Quarterman became the only Hurricane to start 52 consecutive games without missing a start. DraftNasty editor-in-chief Corey Chavous caught up with Quarterman during the week of the 2020 East-West Shrine Bowl. They talked about why finishing was an important part of his legacy. Quaterman modeled his game after his idol, a former Hurricanes linebacker and NFL first round pick who currently serves as his mentor.

Corey: First, I’d like to ask how do you think the week has gone for you so far?
Quarterman: I think the week has progressed for me very well. First day of pads, I already knew it was knocking off the dust. Not for just me, but everybody out here. As it gets better, people get more comfortable, you get to see who really can play. So today I felt like it was night and day from my first day. I just feel like as the week keeps going I’m going to get even better.

Corey: We actually shot your last bowl game (2019 Independence Bowl). A lot of your teammates made the decision not to play in that game. For you, as a team captain, one of the things that you talked about was just how important that last game was to you. Ended that game with 11 tackles. Even though it was a little bit of a debilitating loss, your defense played well. Talk about how you felt about finishing the right way.
Quarterman: I’m a man of principle. I really stick to my principles and morals. I could not have my team out there and feel like they’re better off without me because I wanted to go train just a couple of days early. That’s not the way I want to set a standard. That’s all I’ve ever talked about was the standard. It’s not bailing on your team, because I love my guys and they made their decisions for why they made their decisions. But I’m a team guy, that’s all it is. I couldn’t be on the sidelines and then I was thinking about going but that makes it worse. I’m going to play with my team.

Corey: Right.
Quarterman: 55 is going to lead his team out there. I never folded. I never did that.

Quarterman (No. 55 pictured) finished his career with 356 tackles, 12 quarterback sacks, 46.5 tackles for loss, an interception and 13 passes defensed.

Corey: Our notes on you surround the ability to stack-and-shed. That is one of the things that is a little bit underrated in your game. Talk about why that is important to you…using your hands as a linebacker.
Quarterman: Because that’s how you’ve got to survive in the league (NFL). In college, you can still get away with being more athletic than a lot of guys. But at the next level, that margin of error is cut drastically shorter. You have to be able to do a lot of things to survive. It’s about longevity. The standard career time is already like 2.3 years, so if I can’t use my hands as a linebacker I don’t see how I’m going to see the field. And that’s just being honest. Because it’s a business, it’s about producing. I undertand that. That was one of my critiques last year, so this year I knew I had to work on that. I knew I had to put it on tape multiple times. Like you said, I put it on tape, but it’s very underrated. So I’ve got to change something about me to make it not underrated.

Corey: Now if there’s a question the scouts are asking you when you talk to them. What’s the biggest question they have for you the rest of the postseason? Certainly you’re coming down here this week dispelling any questions they may have. What do you hear the most?
Quarterman: It’s always about my ability to play in space. I’ve been in the box so long at Miami, so good at playing the run, that my coaches didn’t have to worry about that. So if you don’t have to worry about one spot, you can find pieces around him that could play the pass.

Corey: Absolutely.
Quarterman: So I was never groomed for my pass coverage basically. That’s why those question marks exist.

Corey: And they had you coming forward a lot.
Quarterman: Right.

Corey: The tackles for loss weren’t just this year, they were a year ago as well.
Quarterman: Exactly.

Corey: Run blitzes, timing run blitzes.
Quarterman: They just let me do what I do best. And I understand that. But now I’m in a position where I’ve got to show people that I can do the other side of the spectrum.

Corey: And how have you felt that has gone out here (East-West Shrine week)?
Quarterman: The first day was rusty. Today, a whole 180. I didn’t win a single one-on-one yesterday, and I didn’t lose one today.

Corey: That’s awesome man.
Quarterman: Yes sir.

Corey: The tradition at your school is pretty deep at the linebacker position. But if there is a player, even beyond Miami (Fla.), that you’ve looked up to from the NFL perspective -either presently or in the past- who would that be? .
Quarterman: Jon Beason (10-year NFL veteran, former Miami (Fla.) linebacker-2007 NFL Draft, 1st Round, 25th overall, Carolina Panthers). That’s my mentor, man.

Corey: Wow. Really good player.
Quarterman: That’s my mentor. I want to play like him. I still watch his tapes. He let me get a hold of his tapes, so I still watch him. We’re almost built the same. I’m a little taller than him, but as soon as I stepped on campus they talked about our neck sizes and stuff like that. I just love the way he plays the game. I try to do everything that he would do and beyond. Because he did everything the right way. He played through injuries and all that. To have a chance to go to Miami (Fla.) and meet your idol and have him mentor you. And take you underneath his wing and see that he sees it in you. It’s something different. It’s a lot of weight on that.

Quarterman (No. 55 pictured) played the entire 2017 season with a torn left AC joint and finished that year with 83 tackles, 2.5 QB sacks, 7 TFLs and 5 PBUs.

Corey: Four-year starter at Miami from your true freshman year on. The meaning of that?
Quarterman: It’s different. It’s hard. Very difficult. I just really thank Coach Richt and Coach Diaz for trusting in me. It takes a lot to put a true freshman out there…at any position in college football. I really appreciate that. I tried to uphold it as long as I could.

Corey: Well, man, good luck and continue the tradition. I know you gotta get outta here. Nice to meet you. Enjoyed watching you throughout your career.
Quarterman: I appreciate that.

Indianapolis Colts WR Michael Pittman: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 34th overall

Aside from torching Pac-12 defenses for 171 receptions for 2,549 yards (14.7 YPR) and 19 touchdowns, former USC wide receiver Michael Pittman, Jr. also found time to post 17 tackles and blocked three kicks. In addition, he returned one punt for a score. Similar to his father, Michael, Sr., he is a true all-purpose threat on the football field.

Indianapolis Colts DB Julian Blackmon: 2020 NFL Draft, 3rd Round, 85th overall

Former Utah defensive back Julian Blackmon earned AP second-team All-American honors in 2019 as he led a Utes defense that ranked 12th nationally in pass defense. For his career, Blackmon returned two interceptions for touchdowns.

Houston Texans OT Charlie Heck: 2020 NFL Draft, 4th Round, 126th overall

Former North Carolina offensive tackle Charlie Heck started at both tackle spots for the Tar Heels over a three-year period. In 2019, Heck earned second-team All-ACC honors for the Texans at the left tackle spot. He accomplished the feat after suffering a broken hand early in his senior campaign.

Houston Texans DE-OLB Jonathan Greenard: 2020 NFL Draft, 3rd round, 90th overall

Former Florida and Louisville DE-OLB Jonathan Greenard was the Houston Texans third round selection (90th overall) in the 2020 NFL Draft. Greenard finished his career with 19.5 quarterback sacks, 38.5 tackles for losses, four forced fumbles, one fumble recovery (TD), two interceptions and seven pass breakups.