Category Archives: 2021

Avery Williams: Walking on to the Blue Turf

Boise State return man Avery Williams went from a walk-on to an indispensable force for the Broncos. In 2019, he was voted the Mountain West Conference’s Special Teams Player of the Year, which shouldn’t have come as a surprise after notching weekly honors five times during his career. He also set the NCAA all-time record for punt and kickoff return touchdowns (nine).

Williams averaged 11.6 yards per punt return and 27.4 yards per kick return in his career.

But that’s not all…

Williams can make plays at cornerback. For his career, he had 152 tackles, 4.5 tackles for loss, five forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, four interceptions and 22 pass breakups. At cornerback, he is quick-footed and can mirror opposing receivers. How does he do it as a return man? The Pasadena, California native possesses the ability to dart, slide and break tackles on a regular basis. The former high school running back impresses on film with his balance.

For a full scouting report on Williams, purchase Corey Chavous’ 2021 NFL Draft Guide this spring.

Not Your Average Joe, Tryon

Three-sport athletes that stand 6’5″ 260-plus pounds aren’t your “average Joes.” Washington Huskies edge rusher Joe Tryon looks the part and has a strong build. He matches the physical gifts with an ability to line up as both a defensive end and as an outside linebacker in a two-point stance.

Tryon (pictured) had 8 sacks in 2019.

Despite the athletic gifts, he still has room to work on his technique. He only had one year of high-level production in 2019, and it came after he posted one quarterback sack and 4.5 tackles for losses in 2018. Tryon opted out of the 2020 season but still projects as a prospect with the chops to get after the quarterback. Scheme-fit may determine if the former baseball, basketball and football standout out of Washington state’s Hazen High School translates seamlessly to the NFL.

Is he extraordinary or just an average “Joe”?

Ja’Marr… Chase Me To The End Zone

Not many players in this draft can track the ball down the field as well as LSU’s Ja’Marr Chase. Of his 84 receptions in 2019, 24 of them went for 20-plus yards, a nation’s best. He has an ability to carry his pads well despite his running back-esque frame (6’0 227).

Ja’Marr Chase, the 2019 Biletnikoff Award winner, (pictured) hauls in the football.

LSU is known as DBU (Defensive Back University), but lately, with receivers like Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry and Justin Jefferson, the Tigers have become a home for top receiving talent. Chase looks to be another strong prospect from Baton Rouge. In 2019, he posted 84 receptions for 1,780 yards and 20 touchdowns.

Can Chase be dynamic after the catch like the aforementioned receivers from Louisiana State? Time will tell. One thing is for sure, don’t expect too much time to pass before a team “chases” the card to the commissioner to draft the LSU product.

Joshua Kaindoh DE-OLB Florida State: Embryonic Stage

What makes this player NASTY…(Strengths): Has stood out in the classroom. Looks the part. Very good range and on-field speed. Closes in…(for the rest of the Strengths, please reference NOTE at bottom)

Weaknesses: Has yet to step up to turn it on vs. elite competition consistently. Out of his three-point stance at RDE (right-handed), he raises…(for the rest of the Weaknesses, please reference NOTE at bottom)

Other Notes: Attended the IMG Academy (Fla.) but originally hails from Maryland • Played in the 2017 Under Armour All-American Game • He was ranked as the….(for the rest of the Other Notes, please reference NOTE at bottom).

Time to get NASTY (Our Summary): Kaindoh (6’7, 265) presents a challenge for NFL teams. After back-to-back seasons (2017-18) where he began to hypnotize scouts with his combination of length and range, his career was beset with injuries. So where does it go from here? The most plausible comparison could be former Florida State defensive end Josh Sweat (Philadelphia Eagles). The difference? Sweat was more productive in school, but he arguably had even more serious injury concerns entering the league. This past season, the third-year pro set career-highs in sacks (six) and tackles for losses (nine) for the Eagles. Kaindoh has shown flashes when asked to keep contain versus the quarterback. His tackling radius allows him to frustrate teams who use naked bootlegs. Why didn’t he get his hands on more footballs in school as a 6-foot-7-inch defender (two career pass breakups)? On the plus side, he has operated from a two-point alignment and with his hand in the dirt. Is his best football ahead of him? Time will tell. It was unfortunate he got injured in the first game of the season (Georgia Tech ’20) and never seemed to fully recover. Kaindoh may have had the best fall camp of his career in 2020.

NOTE: The entire scouting report on FSU DE-OLB Joshua Kaindoh (including Strengths, Weaknesses, Other Notes and draft projection) will be featured in Corey Chavous’ 2021 NFL Draft Guide/Free Agency review (coming soon).

D’Ante Smith OL-ECU, Scouting Snapshot

What makes this player NASTY…(Strengths): Starts have come at both OG and OT. Has taken his work seriously since bouncing back from injury. Lost 41 pounds…(for the rest of the Strengths, please reference NOTE at bottom)

Weaknesses: Sudden movement throws him off-kilter (Cincinnati ’19). Susceptible to snatch-and-pulls (QB sack allowed, Ankrah, James Madison ’16). He has a…(for the rest of the Weaknesses, please reference NOTE at bottom)

Other Notes: Attended Grovetown HS (Ga.) and was named a three-star recruit by Scout.com • Lettered in wrestling ….(for the rest of the Other Notes, please reference NOTE at bottom).

Time to get NASTY (Our Summary): Despite transforming his body, Smith dealt with a back injury that ended his season in November 2020. The ECU lineman does provide some positional versatility, having seen action at both left guard and left tackle in school. If his 2019 performance against Old Dominion is any indication, scouts will be impressed with his ability to keep his lower body and arms in concert when pass blocking. Keep in mind, that Old Dominion defensive front featured a number of pro prospects the last few seasons. The Georgia native performed at least adequately during the week of the 2021 Senior Bowl practices, as he showed an ability to create some movement inside at guard. Look for teams that emphasize positional versatility to draft and groom Smith this spring.

Note: For the full scouting report on Smith (including Strengths, Weaknesses and Other Notes), please check back for Corey Chavous’ 2021 NFL Draft Guide/Free Agency Review, Volume 18.