All posts by Troy Jefferson

Cincinnati Bengals vs. Pittsburgh Steelers, 12-30-18: In-game report

The Steelers squeaked past the Bengals but it wasn’t enough to qualify for the playoffs.  Despite a 16-13 victory, a number of midseason disappointments allowed the Baltimore Ravens to walk away with the AFC North division title. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

Steelers spread attack

The Steelers employed the spread attack as its primary offensive set during the regular season and this included the season finale against the Bengals.  It allowed them to get their playmakers out in space but it did leave quarterback Ben Roethlisberger susceptible to increased pressure from four-man fronts.  Cincinnati only sacked Big Ben once, but they were able to get him off his throwing spot without blitzing while still keeping two safeties high.  With Antonio Brown out, Roethlisberger started the game by throwing seven completions to five different receivers.  A majority of these passes were wide receiver screens and slants.  As was my concern early in the season, Roethlisberger did fall back into a pattern of turning the football over, not only against the Bengals but all season long. For the game, Roethlisberger finished with one passing touchdown, one interception and 287 passing yards on 68-percent passing.  James Conner led the team with 64 rushing yards on 14 carries. As the Steelers assess their 2018 season offensively, look for them to carry over their spread principles into next year while also finding ways to cut down on the turnovers. 

Turnover differential 

Pittsburgh ranked sixth in scoring offense and were in the top ten in passing yards and rushing yards allowed.  The offensive and defensive stats tell a story of a successful season but turnovers doomed the Steelers and almost cost them their game against the Bengals.  In 2018, Pittsburgh finished with a -11 turnover differential, which ranked 28th in the NFL.  The other four teams with a worst differential than the Steelers were Arizona, Jacksonville, San Francisco and Tampa Bay, all teams who finished with losing records.  Against Cincinnati, Roethlisberger threw a pick- six to Shawn Williams, which represented the Bengals’ only touchdown for the game.  Defensively, Pittsburgh was not able to force the Bengals, who were missing wide receiver A.J. Green and quarterback Andy Dalton, into any mistakes. 

Cincinnati playmakers 

Cincinnati All-Pro wide receiver A.J. Green caught 46 passes for 694 yards and six touchdowns despite appearing in just nine games in 2018.

With A.J. Green, Tyler Boyd and Tyler Eifert out, it was evident that the Bengals just didn’t have the firepower to get players open against the Steelers.  Alex Erickson caught all six of his targets for 63 yards and was able to work over the middle but his longest catch was for just 13 yards.  The Bengals next most productive reviewer was Auden Tate, who caught one pass for 15 yards. Joe Mixon ran for 105 yards and finished with 1,168 yards on the season. The 22- year-old running back should be able to be relied upon for the long- term, but look for the Bengals to continue to try and develop their young playmakers like John Ross, a former Top 10 pick in the 2017 NFL Draft. 

2018 Valero Alamo Bowl In-game report: Iowa State vs. Washington State, 12-28-18

Washington State emerged victorious in a back-and-forth thriller against Iowa State.  The Cougars defeated the Cyclones 28-26 to win the 2018 Valero Alamo Bowl.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

16 Gardner Minshew (6’2 220) Washington State QB-Senior

Former East Carolina quarterback Gardner Minshew's transition to Pullman culminated with his selection as college football's 2018 Johnny United Golden Arm Award winner.

The East Carolina transfer put together a season that ended with him winning the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm award, which is given to the nation’s top senior quarterback.  Minshew impressed in the Valero Alamo Bowl with his short compact delivery and his elusiveness in the pocket.  Iowa State opted to rush just three defensive linemen for the better part of the game and he took his time with patient reads.  When he is at his best, Minshew can power off his back foot and drive the ball in the short and intermediate passing game.  At the next level, the Cougars quarterback will have to answer questions about his deep ball accuracy and ability to run a less quarterback-friendly offense than head coach Mike Leach’s air raid offense.  The former ECU Pirate finished his senior season with 4,779 passing yards, 38 touchdowns and nine interceptions. 

4 Marcus Strong (5’9 185) Washington State CB-Junior

Marcus Strong showed his anticipation and ball skills when he jumped a slant in the first quarter and ran the interception in for a touchdown. The junior cornerback, however, was called for a taunting penalty and had his touchdown negated.  For the game, Strong finished with seven tackles, one sack and one interception.  He impressed this season -and against Iowa State- with his ability to compete and play through the whistle.  Despite giving up nine inches against Iowa State receiver Hakeem Butler, Strong got physical and made life hard on the taller opponent.  The lack of size will concern scouts, but the Cougars cornerback has the right mentality to play on the outside in the NFL. 

18 Hakeem Butler (6’6 225) Iowa State WR-Junior

Butler is physical and not afraid to put his hands on the opposing cornerback to create room in his routes.  He also showed the skills to seal the edge during running plays.  Despite his height, Butler can still get low and get in-and-out of his breaks (see his comeback routes during the first half).  The junior had a productive season, posting 60 catches for 1,318 yards and nine touchdowns.  Against Washington State, he caught nine passes for 192 yards.  This included an acrobatic one-handed catch over the middle of the field. 

32 David Montgomery (5’11 216) Iowa State RB-Junior

David Montgomery has the tools to be an every down back at the next level.  He showed soft hands in the receiving game in the Valero Alamo Bowl (4 catches for 55 yards). And like he did all season long, he refused to go down on first contact.  Against Washington State, he ran for 124 yards and a touchdown on 26 carries. On the season, the Cincinnati native rushed for 1,216 yards and 13 touchdowns. 

2018 Walk-On’s Independence Bowl, In-game report: Duke vs. Temple, 12-27-18

A dominant second half by the Blue Devils was enough to help them cruise to an Independence Bowl victory. Duke scored 35 unanswered points to defeat Temple, 56-27.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

17 Daniel Jones (6’5 220) Duke QB-Junior

With Oregon’s Justin Herbert returning to Oregon for another season, Duke’s Daniel Jones should get some attention earlier in next year's draft.  That is if the redshirt junior decides to declare early.  The Blue Devil signal-caller finished with one rushing touchdown, five passing touchdowns and two interceptions against Temple.  A throw that stood out to me was his pump-and-go pass for a touchdown to T.J. Rahming, the slight pump was enough to get the defensive backs attention and clear the way for Rahming.  Jones not only sold the pump with his legs, head and arm moving in sync but he threw a good pass as well.  The game was a microcosm of his season: a mixed bag of good and bad.  Scouts will question his pocket awareness.  Against Temple, he was sacked three times and for his career, he’s been sacked 82 times. I would like to see the internal clock in his head operate a little quicker and if plays aren’t developing, see him throw the ball away.  The positives for Jones is that he has good size, great athleticism for his stature, can throw on the run and has worked with David Cutcliffe, who has enjoyed a myriad of success with young quarterbacks. 

Jones (No. 17 pictured) connected with Rahming (No. 3 pictured) on a career-long 85-yard touchdown pass in the third quarter of Saturday's Walk-On's Independence Bowl against the Owls.
3 T.J. Rahming (5’10 170) Duke WR-Senior

You can’t help but think of former Duke wide receiver and Redskins current slot receiver, Jamison Crowder, when you see T.J. Rahming. The two have identical builds and are used in similar situations. Rahming is used on jet sweeps as a motion man and works mostly in the slot.  Rahming might be a little faster straight-line than Crowder but he doesn’t have the same agility as his elder.  Like Crowder, Rahming also can help out in the punt return game (5.9 yards per punt career average).  Against Temple, Rahming caught 12 passes for 240 yards and two touchdowns. 

9 Michael Dogbe (6’3 280) Temple DL-Senior

Dogbe is a little light for a defensive tackle but his activity and constant movement is never lacking.  In a time where defense is more about reacting than dictating, Dogbe is a throwback see ball/ get ball type of player.  In the Independence Bowl, Dogbe impressed with his ability to attract double teams and follow and stick with the play from behind.  He projects best as a 4-3 defensive tackle or a 3-4 defensive end at the next level.  At Temple, single digit numbers are reserved for tough and hardworking players and Dogbe has earned his stripes.  For the season, Dogbe finished with 12.5 tackles for loss, seven sacks and three forced fumbles. 

Related Images:

2018 Quick Lane Bowl In-game report: Minnesota vs. Georgia Tech, 12-26-18

Two run heavy offenses squared off in Detroit in the Quick Lane Bowl.  However, Minnesota was able to make more plays in the passing game, en route to a 34-10 victory over Georgia Tech. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

62 Jared Weyler (6’4 300) Minnesota OC/OG- Senior

Weyler has missed time over his career in Minnesota with a torn tricep and a torn ACL but when he is on the field, he provides toughness and leads the heavy run Gophers offense.  The senior can play both guard and center. He is not the most athletic prospect and looks a little stiff when forced to block on screens.  Against Georgia Tech, he did show the ability to call out blocking formations and provide a clean lane for his runners.  Weyler, a captain for the Golden Gophers, projects best at the next level as a center. 

24 Mohamed Ibrahim (5’10 205) Minnesota RB-Freshman

Ibrahim is only a freshman but he impressed all season long with his ability to serve as a workhorse running back. Despite his 31 touches in the Quick Lane Bowl, Ibrahim never looked tired or worn down. He is also a willing blocker in passing formations.  For the season, Ibrahim finished with 1,160 rushing yards and four touchdowns on 202 carries. The running back from Olney, Maryland, didn’t get a chance to show his ability to catch very much this year (four receptions for 26 yards).  In a few years, look for Ibrahim's name to come up as a potential NFL prospect. 

6 Tyler Johnson (6’2 200) Minnesota WR-Junior

Johnson is the best receiving weapon for the Golden Gophers.  His explosiveness off the line of scrimmage is lethal.  He was able to sell a move to the inside in order to get a clean release on the outside for a touchdown in the first quarter.  Against Georgia Tech, Johnson hauled in two touchdowns on four receptions for 57 yards.  For the season, Johnson had 78 catches for 1,169 yards and 12 touchdowns. Johnson projects best as an X-receiver, who has the skills off the line to scare cornerbacks in man-to-man coverage.

Look here at how Johnson uses explosiveness in his routes, high- points the football and makes a play:

3 Tre Swilling (6’0 195) Georgia Tech CB-Freshman

The son of former Saints Pro Bowler Pat Swilling, the younger version stood out in the Quick Lane Bowl because of his clean hips and ability to mirror receivers.   Swilling didn’t see much action to his side against Minnesota and at times it looked as if the Golden Gophers offense was intentionally avoiding him.  For the season, Swilling had one forced fumble, an interception and six pass deflections.  Swilling has the skills and bloodlines to be a next level talent.  As the years go on, his progress will be worth monitoring. 

Minnesota Vikings vs. Detroit Lions, 12-23-18: In-game report

The Vikings used an old formula to stay in the NFC playoff picture and defeat the Lions on the road.  Minnesota relied on a turnover- free game and a solid defensive effort to beat Detroit, 27-9. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

Lions receiving weapons

In 2014, the Lions featured two 1,000-yard receivers in former wideouts Golden Tate III and Calvin Johnson.

The Lions traded away Golden Tate and now lack proven weapons on the outside.  Detroit tried to mask its deficiencies with conservative third down play calling that often featured runs and screens on 3rd and long, but those weren’t effective against a stout Vikings defense.  Kenny Golladay has become a contributor, catching 70 passes for 1,063 yards and five touchdowns on the season.  However, the Vikings began to key in on him and roll coverage his way as he posted just six catches for 58 yards on 15 targets.  Detroit has had its issues with drafting receivers in the past, but the team is in desperate need for playmakers on the outside. 

Vikings offensive gameplan

The formula against the Bears on Sunday will be simple for the Vikings: run the ball and don’t turn it over.  Despite his 29:10 touchdown-to-interception ratio, Cousins has struggled against teams with winning records in his career and this year has been no different.  Last week, the Vikings fired offensive coordinator John DeFilippo before his first season as coordinator could even come to an end.  Quarterbacks coach Kevin Stefanski has taken over and he’s been with the team since the mid-2000s, which means he knows traditionally the Vikings bread has been buttered with its run game. Against the Lions, Dalvin Cook carried the ball 16 times for 73 yards and was the go-to man on 3rd and shorts.   Cook and Latavius Murray should both see 10-to-15 carries apiece and Stefanski will probably opt to play a conservative field position game against the stingy Bears defensive front seven.

Minnesota defense 

The Chicago Bears have dominated headlines in the NFC North but the Vikings still have a defense that can be counted upon. Their problem has been at times they have been forced to play perfect football where as in Chicago there’s a little bit more margin for error.  On the season, the Vikings rank in the top ten in passing yards allowed per game, points against and total yards allowed per game.  They also rank 11th in rushing yards allowed per game.  Danielle Hunter, Everson Griffen, Sheldon Richardson and Tom Johnson have combined to form their own Purple People Eaters group, totaling 29 sacks.  The front end and back end complement each other well in Minnesota and this defense is still a unit to be reckoned with week-to-week. 

Gasparilla Bowl In-game report: Marshall VS. USF, 12-20-18

Marshall used a strong first quarter to take care of business against USF in Tampa. The Thundering Herd defeated the Bulls, 38-20, in the Gasparilla Bowl. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

84 Randall St. Felix (6’2 205) USF WR-Freshman 

If his freshman year was any indication, St. Felix should join the long list of hometown Miami receivers, who have gone on to play at the next level.  St. Felix finished the season with 33 catches for 679 yards and four touchdowns. Against Marshall, he hauled in six passes for 165 yards and two touchdowns.  St. Felix understood where to find the soft spots in the Marshall zone and in man-to-man coverage, and this was evident when he scored a touchdown using a double move in the third quarter.  St. Felix is a clean route runner for such a young prospect, and look for him to only get more refined with more time in college football.

89 Mitchell Wilcox (6’5 245) USF  TE-Junior 

Wilcox fits the mold of the new age tight end: tall, strong and can run.  He impressed when he extended and laid out for a 27-yard catch.  The junior tight end seems like a natural catcher and doesn't let the ball get into his body often, despite his fourth quarter drop. For the season, he finished with 43 catches for 540 yards and two touchdowns. Look for Wilcox to work best at the next level as a tight end out of the slot rather than a traditional in-line blocking tight end.

61 Levi Brown (6’4 290) Marshall OC-Junior 

Levi Brown is a true mauler at center. Brown is a little tall for the position and that shows when he is in pass protection and is forced to maintain a low base.  However, he has excellent hands and reach which allows him to hold sturdy in the interior.  In the run game,  Brown plays through the whistle and is almost always downfield finishing blocks.  The Marshall center was named to the second team Conference USA roster in 2017.  This year, he may been in for a first team finish. Brown will probably return for another year of college but look for him to be in the conversation as a Day 2 draft pick in 2020.

8 Tyre Brady (6’3 206) Marshall WR-senior

Back in his home state of Florida, Brady put on a show. The Homestead native caught five passes for 88 yards and ran once for 14 yards.  Despite his 6-foot-3-inch frame, Brady moves with fluidity and was used on reverses and screens throughout the game. The senior wide receiver also showed strong hands on a 42-yard catch in the first quarter when he used an inside release and then out- muscled the smaller USF corner for the football. On the season, Brady finished with 71 catches for 1,002 yards and nine touchdowns.  An NFL team will be getting a productive and versatile receiver if they bring in Brady.

UCLA vs. Cincinnati, 12-20-18: In-game report

In a true non-conference road game for UCLA, the home team manhandled the Bruins. Cincinnati rained three pointers all night long, en route to a 93-64 win.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-=game report:

34 Jarron Cumberland (6’5 205) Cincinnati guard/forward- Junior

Cumberland led the Bearcats first half barrage, scoring 19 of his 25 points in the first twenty minutes. The junior shot 9-of-17 from the field and 4-of-5 from the three-point line.  He used his strong football-type build to bulldoze his way to the lane with both hands. He coupled his physicality with a nice jump shot on Thursday night.  Scouts at the next level will question his lateral quickness and jumping ability. Cumberland did show the ability to switch from point guard to small forward, but whether he can keep up with the more athletic guards in the NBA remains a question mark. 

33 Nysier Brooks (6’11 240) Cincinnati center-Junior

Brooks is tall, long and competes on both ends of the floor. The junior center is averaging eight points, five rebounds and 1.5 blocks per game in 21 minutes of action this season.  Against UCLA, Brooks dominated in 19 minutes of game time, totaling 14 points, six rebounds and two blocks.  The Philadelphia native served as a defensive anchor for the Bearcats, who harassed the Bruins all night defensively. 

“A lot of people are surprised by our toughness because our defense is something special," Brooks said after the game. "Nobody knows what it is, but it's something special."

Brooks does have a tendency to get into foul trouble and could help his draft stock by adding a few more post moves to his tool belt. With another year of seasoning, Brooks could intrigue scouts with his length and potential as a defensive difference maker. 

13 Kris Wilkes (6’8 215) UCLA guard-Sophomore 

Wilkes returned to UCLA after forgoing the NBA draft last spring. The sophomore guard is a catch-and-shoot scorer, who is also explosive going to the rim.  Wilkes was the lone bright spot offensively for the Bruins, scoring 21 points on 6-of-12 shooting while going 5-of-8 from the three-point line. The Indianapolis native will serve best in the NBA as a shooting guard.  He isn’t a primary ballhandler and isn’t asked at UCLA to set others up. Wilkes does rebound well for his slight build (averages four rebounds a game). Despite his lack of ball handling abilities, Wilkes is a great outlet passer and is able to set others up in transition once he grabs the rebound. Although a good shooter, he could stand to improve his percentage at the free throw line (67-percent in career).  The athletic tools are in place for Wilkes to be a first round draft pick. 

Buffalo Bulls vs. Syracuse Orange, 12-18-18: In-game report

A one-sided rivalry in upstate New York finished with a new twist on Tuesday night.  The 14th-ranked Buffalo Bulls defeated Syracuse, 71-59, to earn their first victory against the Orange since 1963.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

2 Jeremy Harris (6’7 185) Buffalo guard- Senior

Harris was the conductor of the Buffalo offense against the Orange. Against Syracuse’s famed 2-3 zone, Harris manned the middle and made passes from the free throw line to initiate the Bulls offense. The senior guard also showed the ability to drive to the basket using a hesitation dribble and despite a low percentage this season, he has shot the ball well from three in the past (41 percent in 2017-18).  Harris has good length and a strong offensive skill-set but his lateral quickness and strength will be tested at the next level.   the season, Harris is averaging 13 points per game, five rebounds and 2.7 assists.

5 C.J. Massinburg (6’3 194) Buffalo guard-Senior

Massinburg has been the go-to scorer for the Bulls over the last three seasons.  This year, he is averaging 17 points per game on 48- percent shooting. Earlier in the season against West Virginia, he scored 43 points and against Syracuse, he had 25. Despite a slight build, Massingburg isn’t afraid to rebound the ball.  He’s averaging seven rebounds on the season.  His team relies on him for so much of the scoring load that he hasn’t prioritized setting up others at Buffalo, but this will be a needed skill  for Massinburg to make it in the NBA as a guard. 

25 Tyus Battle (6’6 205) Syracuse-Junior 

When it comes to big shot making, Tyus Battle is the equivalent of Buffalo’s C.J Massinburg.

"He makes (big shots),“ Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim said, after Battle hit a game winning shot against Georgetown earlier in the season. "He makes a lot of big shots, probably as much as anybody who's been here or more. He's right there.”

"He's a very good player. He hurt us last year and he hurt us this year,” added former Georgetown All-American center and current head coach, Patrick Ewing.

Against Buffalo, Battle scored 11 points on 4-of-10 shooting. Battle is best when he can get out in transition, and then avoid players with his strong two-handed dribbling abilities.  From his downhill attacking,  Battle can open up his game with his pull-up jumper. 

Here is an example of how Battle's constant push of the ball in transition forces defenders to backpedal and give him a free release on his jumper:

As is always the question with Syracuse players, can Battle play man to man defense after spending years in the 2-3 zone?

Houston Texans vs. New York Jets, 12-15-18: In-game report

The Houston Texans have a chance to clinch a first round bye in the AFC playoffs if they can finish the regular season with two wins after defeating the Jets on Saturday. The Texans, as they have done all season, relied on solid quarterback play, an elite receiver and a ferocious pass rush to defeat the Jets, 29-22.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

DeAndre Hopkins

Football is a simple game when wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins is on your team.  Deshaun Watson and the Texans don’t have to overthink or scheme Hopkins open, as the former Clemson Tiger can go over, around and run past defensive backs.  Hopkins (6’1, 215) has elite timing and jumping ability, which allows him to make catches while draped by cornerbacks, resembling a gymnast more than a football player.  Hopkins has 94 receptions for 1,321 yards and 11 touchdowns on the season.  Even more impressive, 67 of those catches have gone for first downs.  When the league’s best receivers are being discussed, Hopkins name should be at the forefront.  Defensively, anything short of double coverage won't suffice and at times -as he showed on Saturday- that may not be enough.

Sam Darnold

DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson highlighted Sam Darnold in the preseason against the Redskins and was impressed with his command of the offense.  15 weeks into his rookie season and the same holds true.  Darnold has a good feel for the game for a rookie quarterback, he isn’t afraid to run when nothing is there and did his best work during the two-minute drill before halftime.  The former USC Trojan will have to work on his feet when surrounded by the rush.   If enough pressure gets around him, he exhibited the tendency to float the ball and not get his lower body involved.  This lack of torque in his throws led to balls with less velocity and forced receivers to work back to the ball from their routes (see his two third down throws on the second possession of the game). These tweaks should be correctable.   Along with Cleveland’s Baker Mayfield and Baltimore’s Lamar Jackson, Darnold has showed promise in his first season under center.  Like his fellow draft mates, Darnold must cut down on the turnovers (14 passing touchdowns-to- 15 interceptions on the season.)

Robby Anderson

Robby Anderson (6’3 190) has a similar lanky build as Hopkins but is more of a vertical threat than he is an acrobatic catcher. 

"They've got a receiver that probably runs as fast as anybody we've played in Anderson," Texans coach Bill O'Brien said before the matchup. 

As he has gotten comfortable with a rookie quarterback, Anderson has caught 38 passes for 588 yards and five touchdowns. The 25- year old receiver is playing his best football as the season comes to a close, notching 11 catches for 172 yards and two touchdowns over the last two weeks.  He hasn’t had the luxury of steady quarterback play early on in his career but the skills are in place.  As the former Temple Owl grows with Darnold, look for the duo to establish more of a connection in the seasons to come. 

Tennessee Volunteers vs. Memphis Tigers, 12-15-18: In-game report

An old college basketball rivalry has been rekindled thanks to one team being led by a former NBA all-star turned head coach and another team ranked in the Top Five.  The third-ranked Tennessee Volunteers defeated Memphis, 102-92, on Saturday afternoon.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

5 Admiral Schofield (6’6 241) Tennessee guard- Senior

Schofield is the big shot taker and the big shot maker for the Volunteers.  The senior guard can catch and shoot off picks and create his own shot with a left-to-right crossover. Against Memphis, Schofield had a team-high 29 points on 8-of-12 shooting.  He also led his team with 11 rebounds.  The Tigers made a few runs in the game to keep things close but every time they tried to leapfrog the Volunteers, Schofield was there to make a big basket. 

"We wanted to come in and make a statement for our university here on their floor," Schofield said after the game.  "And I think we did that, so you know the crowd was chirping a little bit. So I just had to let them know. UT. UT still on top."

At the next level, is where things will get tricky for Schofield.  He is 6-foot-6 and not extremely long.  His body type resembles that of Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker, and  in order to adjust to the NBA, Schofield might have to adopt Tucker’s three-and-D game.  

2 Grant Williams (6’7 236) Tennessee forward- Junior

Grant Williams brings the grit and low post presence for the Volunteers.  The Tennessee junior likes to start the game by getting his rhythm in the post, using a turnaround shot over his left shoulder.  Williams can also occasionally pull out to the perimeter and make open long twos and threes (46-percent 3-point shooter). However, Williams knows where his bread is buttered and can mostly be found around the rim. Last season, Williams was named the SEC Player of the Year.  He might not have a natural position at the next level but at the very least, Williams will garner attention as a G-League/ NBA two-way contract prospect. 

0 Kyvon Davenport (6’8 215) Memphis forward- Senior

Davenport fits the mold of the new NBA forward, he can run to the rim end-to-end but also can float to the three-point line.  Despite coming off the bench against the Volunteers, Davenport played starter minutes and with a 56-percent field goal percentage and 44- percent three-point percentage, he is efficient in the time he does play.  For the season, Davenport is averaging 15 points per game and seven rebounds.  Against Tennessee, he had 31 points and 11 rebounds. 

“We know he’s a double-double machine,” said head coach Penny Hardaway after an earlier game this season against Tennessee Tech. “And we’re going to need that from him all year.”

Hardaway benched Davenport four games into the season but since then the senior has responded. 

“That’s a question I’ll have to pose to myself later: Is it time for Kyvon to go back in (the starting lineup)? Because he’s playing well coming off the bench, he’s playing minutes,” Hardaway said after the Tennessee game.

No matter what happens, Davenport is highly productive and talented and will catch the eyes of NBA scouts as the season goes on.