Category Archives: NFC East

Dallas Cowboys 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA recap

How ’bout those Cowboys?

The selection of Tolbert fits the profile of the receiver they lost in free agency, Cedrick Wilson (Dolphins). Reinforcements were needed after trades during the offseason. He also provides insurance and perhaps a new timetable for the return of the re-signed Michael Gallup. Smith’s run blocking potential has to excite the running backs on the team’s roster, regardless of where he plays.

Jalen Tolbert WR Dallas Cowboys
Cowboys third-round pick Jalen Tolbert often played bigger than his size even would indicate on the outside lanes in school. It is a big reason he was named the 2021 Sun Belt Conference Offensive Player of the Year.
       
Dallas Cowboys
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (24)Tyler SmithOT/Tulsa54/2nd RoundSmith's quick nature stood out in a number of games, but none more so than the 2020 Armed Forces Bowl. In that contest, he had a disdain for Mississippi State's DL.
2 (56)Sam WilliamsOLB-DE/Ole Miss123/3rd RoundWilliams' combination of size and speed is rare. 33.5 tackles for loss in three seasons is nothing to sniff at either. He was on fire during the 2022 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and carried it over into the Senior Bowl.
3 (88)Jalen TolbertWR/South Alabama76/2nd RoundTolbert's high-wire acts on the perimeter probably drew comparisons to the types of receivers that the Cowboys employ. Most are in the 6-foot-1-to-6-foot-3-range and weigh around 200 pounds.
4 (129)Jake FergusonTE/H-back Wisconsin182/4th RoundFerguson's savvy as a route runner help him overcome a relative lack of elite burst getting off of the line of scrimmage in a three-point stance. One of the more cerebral tight ends in this year's draft class.
5 (155)Matt WaletzkoOT/North Dakota57/2nd RoundWaletzko's ease of movement stood out in the film viewed. He has room to grow as a run blocker. If the power translates to the next level, then his near 86-inch wingspan could be put to good use.
5 (167) CompensatoryDaRon BlandCB/Fresno State, Sacramento State229/4th RoundBland displayed many of the tools in the Mountain West that he had already shown as an All-Big Sky corner. He works well around traffic and plays longer than even his size would indicate.
5 (176) CompensatoryDamone ClarkLB/LSU207/4th RoundPrior to the spinal fusion surgery, Clark carried a third-round grade. With him being potentially unavailable in Year 1, this serves as a solid pick in the 2023 NFL Draft.
5 (178) CompensatoryJohn RidgewayDT/Arkansas, Illinois State70/2nd RoundRidgeway, a longtime MMA competitor, uses his hands as well as any defensive lineman in this year's draft. He has capability sliding up-and-down the interior of the defensive front on first or second down.
6 (193): From Browns in the Amari Cooper tradeDevin HarperLB/Oklahoma State258/4th RoundHarper's explosiveness on the field was justified by his postseason workouts. As he attempts to improve his eye control, he will look to earn a roster spot on special teams.
UDFA signings
Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty ‘Take’
155Markquese BellS-LBFlorida A&M, Maryland5.7253rd RoundBell found his rhythm as a Rattler with force timing hits in the middle of the field and he often handled motion adjustments. His 4.44 speed works at 212 pounds.
174Aaron HansfordLBTexas A&M5.684th RoundA little older at 24 years old, the former WR came on strong as a force in his senior season. His injury history may have caused a slide.
199Isaac Taylor-StuartCBUSC5.6354th RoundTaylor-Stuart’s smooth nature complements the 24-foot long jumper’s profile. Finding the ball with his back turned to the QB needs to be the focus moving forward. He can play off-man or bump-and-run.
204Juanyeh ThomasS-LBGeorgia Tech5.6254th RoundDating back to 2018, Thomas was a factor returning kicks. He even outpaced the Georgia Bulldogs on a 100-yard kickoff return back in 2018. He’s since relinquished that role, but his hard-charging style could be welcomed on special teams.
233Alec LindstromOCBoston College5.5334th RoundLindstrom uses his hands well in pass protection and showed awareness dealing with line games. Does his size translate to the next level? Contains snap-and-pull capability.
284Dontario DrummondWROle Miss5.3684th RoundA smooth route runner with less than stellar speed, Drummond is underrated as a run after the catch threat. He found a way to win nearly every week in the SEC, posting 13 Red Zone TD receptions the last two seasons.
391Markaviest 'Big Kat' BryantDE-OLBUCF, Auburn5.0855th RoundBryant stood out on UCF’s defense this past season with 14 TFLs. It wasn’t the first time he had been productive at the collegiate level. Still needs work on establishing secondary pass rush counters despite snaps dating back to 2018.
397Ty FryfogleWRIndiana5.0595th RoundThe 2020 Big Ten Receiver of the Year made a habit of the highlight film grab in school. Becoming more efficient in short areas has to be the focus as he enters a training camp this summer.
410Peyton HendershotTE/H-BackIndiana 5.025th RoundThe former basketball standout at the prep level played with an even increased vigor in 2021. He may be faster with the ball in his hands than when running routes.
413Jonathan GaribayPKTexas Tech5.015th RoundEven on some of Garibay’s big misses (see Baylor ’21), the range and distance was in place. The All-Big 12 placekicker has an effortless strain on longer field goals, but kicked off just 24 times in school.
506James EmpeyOCBYU4.676th RoundEmpey was relatively durable until injuries stopped his charge somewhat as a senior. The CoSIDA Academic All-District performer possesses adequate snap-and-step quickness. He also exhibited the ability to hit moving targets in space when pulling.
564La’Kendrick Van ZandtSTCU4.476th RoundHe’s missed time at both the prep level and collegiately due to injury. The 2020 Honorable mention All-Big 12 performer has a 79” wingspan and blitz capability due to his short-area burst.
Dennis HoustonWRWestern Illinois, Houston BaptistN/AN/AThe first-team All-MVFC receiver finished with 90 receptions in 2021. This came after the Fullerton College transfer stood out in the spring of 2021. The 6-foot-1 speedster gets to his top speed quickly as a runner or receiver.
Storey JacksonLBLiberty, Prairie View A&M N/AN/AJackson turned the script on his 2021 season with an interception in the short zone against UAB. This came a week after struggling against Syracuse on occasion.
Amon SimonTexas A&M CommerceN/AN/ASimon (6’5, 303), a first-team All-LSC selection, relies on his length and wingspan to win on the perimeter.
Aaron ShampklinRBHarvardN/AN/AThe speedster put up another big season for the Crimson, but it wasn’t the first time for the California native.

The Cowboys have created a formidable quartet of interior line defenders and Ridgeway adds to the mix. Bland could become the surprise of this draft class at cornerback and, if nothing else, provide depth on special teams. This will also be the case for Harper, who should compete with backup Luke Gifford. The team had just seven receptions remaining from its backup tight ends after the release of Blake Jarwin.

Washington Commanders 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA recap

The Commanders upgraded its speed quotient at wide receiver. Think about an opening day quartet of Terry McLaurin, Curtis Samuel, Dyami Brown and Jahan Dotson.

Not bad.

Mathis posted nine quarterback sacks for the Crimson Tide in 2021 after notching just one-and-a-half the three seasons prior.

Even if you discount the fact that Chase Young had just one-and-a-half sacks in nine games, the defensive line needed more interior pass rush. Daron Payne had just four-and-a-half sacks in 17 starts, but posted a large number of quarterback hits. But they released DT Matt Ioannidis (Panthers), leaving a void in terms of depth along the front seven. He posted 24.5 quarterback sacks in six seasons with the team. Mathis could make up for some of the lost production and should be entrenched in a battle for snaps.

Washington finished 29th in passing defense a year ago but like their safeties in Kamren Curl and Bobby McCain, two former corners. They added more size to the outside lanes with the late addition of Christian Holmes, who will battle for a roster spot.

Washington Commanders 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA      
Washington Commanders
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (16)Jahan DotsonWR/Penn State32/2nd RoundDotson's body control, route-running expertise and improved foot speed all provide upgrades in a receiving corps that desperately needed just that.
2 (47)Phidarian MathisDT/Alabama120/3rd RoundMathis provides depth to an already impressive defensive front that severely underachieved in 2021. He provides a different type of interior pass rush presence for the Commanders, although the sack totals were not of a sustained profile.
3 (98)Brian Robinson, Jr.RB/Alabama158/3rd RoundRobinson only started for one season, but that doesn’t take away from his improved receiving skills and impressive work in pass protection. He’ll be able to compete for a backup job in Washington.
4 (113)Percy ButlerS/Louisiana-Lafayette151/3rd RoundButler’s work coming downhill in the alleys was only outdone by his work at gunner, where his 4.36 speed makes him tough to stop once he gets a bead on returners.
5 (144)Sam HowellQB/North Carolina 86/2nd RoundHowell was the only FBS quarterback to throw for 3,000 yards and rush for over 800 yards this past season. His release still needs work, as does his footwork.
5 (149)Cole TurnerTE-H-back/Nevada292/4th RoundTurner, a former WR, overcomes any instant acceleration with body control, catch radius and Red Zone capability. He has worked on the kickoff return unit in school, blocked as an H-back with effort and improved every season on campus.
7 (230)Chris PaulOT-OG/Tulsa342/5th RoundPaul has a couple of technique issues to clean up but that doesn’t take away from a quick-footed profile that still makes it tough to clear for defensive ends. He has flex capability along the team’s offensive line.
7 (240)Christian HolmesCB/Oklahoma State, Missouri257/4th RoundHolmes was competitive at Missouri, which made it a surprise that he went to Oklahoma State in the first place. His physical style translates well as a backup and core special teams contributor.
Commanders 2022 UDFA signings
DN Big Board Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty Take’
200Jequez EzzardWR/All-purposeSam Houston State, Howard5.634th RoundEzzard will get an opportunity to compete for the starting punt return job in training camp. The all-purpose dynamo plays much bigger than his 5-foot-9-inch frame would indicate.
400Cole KelleyQBSE Louisiana5.055th RoundKelley has worked on shortening his release and actually ran for 16 TDs this past season. He also found time to throw for over 5,000 yards and
417Tyrese RobinsonOG-OTOklahoma55th RoundRobinson moved to the right tackle position in 2021 and held his own. At 6’3, 318 pounds, we think he projects to the right guard spot in the NFL.
437Kyric McGowanAll-PurposeGeorgia Tech, Northwestern4.925th RoundMcGowan’s frame and strength enabled him to get a free agent shot. He surprised in the slot this past season after being more of a return specialist at Northwestern. The former Wildcats
442Curtis HodgesTE/H-BackArizona State4.95th RoundHodges’ change of direction skill could be underrated considering his 6-foot-8-inch frame. After four uninspiring years on campus, Hodges took his game to another level in 2021.
582Ferrod GardnerLB-SLouisiana-Lafayette, Missouri4.386th RoundGardner’s size (6’0 210) most likely eliminated any chance of him getting drafted. On the field, his ability to track things down was one thing, but he has long arms (32”) and positive instincts. He stood out against some of the Power 5 teams on their schedule (Iowa State ’20).
583Tre WalkerLBIdaho4.386th RoundThe first-team All-Big Sky linebacker covers ground well and was all over the field. Reading his keys a step faster would help his game. The effort working on the punt unit was more than satisfactory in school (see Indiana ’21).
672Jacub PanasiukDEMichigan State3.967th RoundWill Panasuik’s strength translate? He finished with 29 career tackles for losses and has been a contributor since 2017. Decent size at 6’3, 257 pounds.
693Drew WhiteLBNotre Dame3.747th RoundWhite can close in B-lines but he’s been a step late snapping the pictures.
Devin TaylorDBBowling Green, Virginia Tech, Illinois StateN/AN/ATaylor, a double transfer with 32” arms, provides a presence on the outside lanes. The instincts have been phenomenal at every stop. The former All-MVFC finished with 13 interceptions and 43 pass breakups at three different stops.

We may have been just as impressed with the free agent class of undrafted players. There were four players we had with fifth-round grades. Former Sam Houston State and Howard standout Jequez Ezzard may have an opportunity to compete for a punt returner’s role in a training camp. The team lost its starting punt returner, DeAndre Carter (Chargers), in free agency. Like Carter, Ezzard -the 2020-21 FCS National Championship Game MVP– enters the league as an undrafted free agent.

Philadelphia Eagles 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA signings recap

To fully encapsulate the Eagles’ 2022 NFL Draft, one has to take in the AJ Brown trade first and foremost. After that, the team drafted a ‘center of the future’ in Cam Jurgens and picked up the most athletic 340-pounder this side of the WWE in Jordan Davis. The team then went out and got his teammate, Georgia LB Nakobe Dean, stopping a draft day slide.

General manager Howie Roseman swapped picks in the first round with Houston and then gave the Texans a 2022 fourth-round pick (124), 2022 fifth-round pick (152) and another 2022 fifth-round pick (156) for the chance to draft Davis. A sleeper selection may be Kansas’ Kyron Johnson, who brings potential as an exchange linebacker and edge rusher on third downs.

Former Kansas LB Kyron Johnson, pictured, forced four fumbles for the Jayhawks in 2021.
Philadelphia Eagles    
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (13) Acquired from HoustonJordan DavisDT/Georgia5/1st RoundBig presence and big expectations are in store for the 6-foot-6, 341-pounder. Can he develop a pass rush arsenal?
2 (51)Cam JurgensOC/Nebraska 66/2nd RoundJurgens did not experience a draft day slide due to his wonderful physical gifts. He has few limitations other than one. Can he consistently be relied upon for accurate shotgun snaps in the NFL?
3 (83)Nakobe DeanLB/Georgia26/2nd RoundDean has enough ability to uncover himself with his eye speed tracking down loose plays such as screens or reverses. There are times, however, when the action does in fact get too big for him. The 2021 Butkus Award winner did miss three tackles in the team's season opener against Clemson despite notching two quarterback sacks.
6 (181) Acquired from
Kyron JohnsonLB/Kansas352/5th RoundThe Texas contest opened up everyone's eyes to how much Johnson could dominate a contest, but that type of energy was seen week-to-week. With 4.4 speed and a motor to match, it will be interesting to see how the Eagles employ his services on special teams and beyond. Can he play the ILB spot?
6 (198) Acquired from Steelers via JaguarsGrant CalcaterraTE-H-back/SMU, Oklahoma291/4th RoundA couple of years ago, it wasn't even a foregone conclusion that Calcaterra would continue to play. It had to be quite the day for him when he heard his name called after such a tough time at two different schools. Athletic pass catcher with excellent route-running skill.

2022 Philadelphia Eagles UDFA signings:

2022 Eagles UDFA signings      
DN Big Board rankPlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty’ Take:
68Carson StrongQBNevada6.162nd RoundStrong’s medical concerns overshadowed a career that demonstrated toughness, range as a passer and high football intelligence. His postseason did not help his cause.
160William DunkleOGSan Diego Stateate5.713rd RoundDunkle’s tenacity as a run blocker often created forward movement for a stout running game. His hands often got too busy in pass protection.
170Mario GoodrichCB-NickelClemson5.694th RoundGoodrich’s instant nature and aggression overcame any lack of long recovery speed in school. He plays longer than his size would indicate. Can he slide inside to nickel?
185Reed BlankenshipSMiddle Tennessee5.674th RoundBlankenship posted career-highs in tackles for loss in 2021, but never regained his 2018 form. In that season, he made plays in coverage all over the field.
207Josh JobeCB-NickelAlabama5.624th RoundJobe ranks as yet another prospect whose best years were in the rear view mirror of his latest results. Proving that he can overcome a lack of bulk on the perimeter will be the challenge.
250Noah EllissDT-NGIdaho5.494th RoundElliss ranks as a two-down defender who consistently bows back interior OL. He showed more on-field range than his postseason workout results suggest.
276Kennedy BrooksRBOklahoma5.424th RoundBrooks, a smooth runner with a gliding style, didn’t turn into a game changer. Nonetheless, his 6.3 yards per carry average lays credence to his vision. He can execute in gap-schemed or zone-based run offenses.
287E.J. PerryQBBrown, Boston College5.364th RoundThe 2022 East-West Shrine Bowl MVP was more than adequate as a playmaker in the Ivy League after flashing slightly at Boston College. He is a playmaker who needs to reign in the risks he takes in an NFL training camp. The athleticism is vastly underrated.
302Josh BlackwellCB-NickelDuke5.294th RoundBlackwell’s 4.3 speed was well-documented and he covers with a calm that represents that. Durability has been the question mark since arriving on campus.
315Josh SillsOG-OTOklahoma State, West Virginia5.2334th RoundSills started off at West Virginia and was productive while there. His experience at both OG and OT helped his cause, as does his outstanding size.
387Jarrid WilliamsOTMiami (Fla.), Houston5.095th RoundWilliams was consistent at Houston, started off fine at Miami (Fla.) and then took a step back at times in 2021. The rare length and wingspan give him a chance, but the feet have to catch up.
416Britain CoveyAll-PurposeUtah55th RoundCovey’s age was well-documented. The production should be considered, too. The former Ute returned a punt for a TD against SDSU’s Matt Araiza early in the year and then a kickoff back for a TD in the 2022 Rose Bowl.

New York Giants 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA signings recap

The Giants went into this year’s draft with a new general manager in Joe Schoen, new head coach in Brian Daboll and two new coordinators in Mike Kafka and Don “Wink” Martindale. Did the draft accomplish what the team needed to complete its offseason?

The Giants had a plan in this year’s draft and free agency. Improve the team’s running game and create more pressure on opposing quarterbacks. After signing OGs Max Garcia and Mark Glowinski in free agency, they sought out Alabama’s Evan Neal and UNC’s Joshua Ezeudu in the draft. To that point, adding Bellinger also serves as a possible precursor to more two tight end sets. We referenced below that QB Daniel Jones could be feeling much better. If so, then RB Saquon Barkley is executing backflips.

Former Iowa safety/nickel Dane Belton, the Giants’ second fourth-round selection, posted a career-high five interceptions in 2021.
New York Giants    
1 (5)Kayvon ThibodeauxDE-OLB/Oregon3/1st RoundFor all of the talk about what Thibodeaux wants to do off the field, what about what he can do on it? His instant nature, combative hands and quick-footed approach present different pictures for OTs. He could become a problem if offenses decide to leave him one-on-one in Year 1.
1 (7)Evan NealOT/Alabama 9/1st RoundNeal has the prototype build to man the tackle opposite incumbent LT Andrew Thomas. QB Daniel Jones has to be somewhere smiling.
2 (43)Wan'Dale RobinsonWR/Kentucky, Nebraska125/3rd RoundIs there a tougher receiver in the draft? Robinson made all of the plays down the field for Kentucky but also proved to be a jet sweep or swing pass option within the framework of the offense.
3 (67)Joshua EzeuduOG/North Caroina85/2nd RoundThe selection of Ezeudu proves that the Giants are going to work to improve an anemic running game. He has made starts at RT, LT and LG. Played through a torn mensicus in 2020.
3 (81)
Acquired from Dolphins
Cordale FlottCB-Nickel/LSU218/4th RoundFlott's cover skills and savvy in the slot have been apparent since he stepped on campus. Bulk is the biggest question mark.
4 (112) Acquired from the BearsDaniel BellingerTE/San Diego State114/3rd RoundBellinger's postseason workouts should not have come as a surprise. He was a track star at the high school level and nearly went under 11 seconds in the 100-meter dash. On the field, he can execute any type of block with his hand in the dirt and provides a build-speed option up the rails of the defense. Can he win in the short areas as a route runner?
4 (114)
Acquired from Falcons
Dane BeltonS-Nickel/Iowa96/3rd RoundBelton has a feel for reading through route combinations and has experience covering the slot dating back to 2019, when he was the team's nickel. As his career went along, Belton improved his angles in coverage. The tackling needs to improve.
5 (146)
Acquired from Jets
Micah McFaddenLB/Indiana124/3rd RoundMcFadden was one of the Big Ten's best coming forward as a blitz threat. In addition, there is enough speed to swallow up distance in space. Playing with slightly more knee bend could take his game to the next level.
5 (147)D.J. DavidsonDT/Arizona State307/4th RoundDavidson aligned primarily inside as the zero-or-one-technique DT, but did see time at the two-or-three-technique DT spots as well. Light on his feet at 325 pounds.
5 (173) From the Chiefs through the RavensMarcus McKethanOL/North Carolina 317/4th RoundAt nearly 6-foot-7, the 348-pound McKethan played OG as a 37-game starter in school. Could his 85-inch wingspan at least get him looks on the perimeter? Efficient on his skip-pull techniques at his size. Needs to block with more than just the upper body on a consistent basis.
6 (182)Darrian BeaversLB/Cincinnati, UConn139/3rd Round-Beavers started off as an athletic 235-pound LB at UConn before growing into a 260-pound force for the Bearcats. He projects as a 3-4 inside linebacker and fits what the defense will be doing moving forward.

Here is a recap of the team’s 2022 UDFA signings:

NY Giants Undrafted Free agent signings      
DN Big Board Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty’ Take
239Zyon GilbertCB-NickelFAU5.524th RoundGilbert’s incredible physical tools (11’6” BJ, 41” VJ) give him an opportunity to make the team in a special teams role.
256Yusef CorkerSKentucky5.484th RoundKnown as the team’s ‘Director of Communications’, Corker’s 4.4 speed often overcomes any rigidness.
261Austin AllenTENebraska5.464th RoundAllen - the Big Ten’s TE of the Year- can stretch the seams but needs to get stronger and run more precise routes. His 6’8” height helps his cause.
279Trenton ThompsonSSan Diego State5.414th RoundThompson was a multi-purpose player who made a number of plays in coverage this past season.
282Chris HintonDTMichigan5.374th RoundHinton uses his hands fairly well, but needs to develop consistent urgency in his play.
339Jashaun CorbinRB-KR (All-Purpose)FSU, Texas A&M5.185th RoundCorbin ranked third in the country in kickoff returns during the 2018 campaign (30.1 yds/KR, TD).
405Jeremiah HallFB/H-backOklahoma5.035th RoundHall was a multi-purpose threat as a blocker on the move and receiver during his time at Oklahoma. Can heprove capable on special teams without short-area explosion?
418Tomon FoxOLBNorth Carolina55th RoundFox ran around a number of OTs in school to the tune of 44.5 career tackles for losses.
452Antonio ValentinoDT-NGFlorida, Penn State4.865th RoundValentino -former known as Antonio Shelton- contains extreme power as a run defender but needs to improve at staying centered as a pass rusher.
636Brandon EasterlingSDayton4.137th RoundEasterling benefitted from a breakout 2019 campaign as an all-purpose defensive back. He has good foot speed on the field and plays with enough urgency to perhaps translate to the next level.
678Baer HunterOC-OGAppalachian State3.947th RoundNo one hunts down the opposition like Hunter, who improved markedly over the course of his career. He wins with more than just a roughhouse approach.
685Josh RivasOGKansas State3.877th RoundRivas’ size (6’5 323) gives him a chance. As does his accuracy in terms of understanding assignments. Experienced veteran who should compete for a practice squad opportunity if he can hold up in pass protection.
702Tyrone TruesdellDTFlorida, Auburn3.6627th RoundTruesdell took a step backwards after leaving Auburn, but it doesn’t take away from some of the early success he had in the SEC.
712Matthew AllenOCMichigan State3.587th RoundAllen plays much quicker and more efficient than his postseason workout times suggest on the field. He could surprise if the size isn’t deficient.
Navaughn DonaldsonOT-OGMiami (Fla.)N/AN/ADonaldson started off as a tackle, has played guard and continued to contribute. The team’s entire OL took a major step back in 2021.
Andre MillerWRMaineN/AN/AThe statistics didn’t often tell the story for Miller, whose body control impressed during his time at Maine.
Jahcour PearsonWROle MissN/AN/AAlthough Pearson didn’t score in 2021, he did flash with 76 receptions at WKU back in 2019.
Jabari Ellis DTSouth Carolina N/AN/AEllis, a productive defender for South Carolina, produced career-highs in tackles and tackles for loss in 2021.
Darren Evans CBLSUN/AN/AEvans is a long corner with enough mobility to potentially learn techniques from current Giant James Bradberry.
Jaylin BannermannDEUtah StateN/AN/ABannerman’s length and overall movement give him an opportunity if he can continue to make positive weight gains.
Daylin BaldwinWRMichigan, Jackson StateN/AN/AThe former Tiger acquitted himself well for the Wolverines this past season. He averaged a little over 15 yards per catch on 17 receptions.

2022 NFL Free Agency, Live Updates: NFC East

The NFC East has had its share of movement within the first week of free agency. Quite a bit of it was through its own volition. The Cowboys lost Randy Gregory, but signed one of its top receivers to an extension. The Commanders made a splash by trading for former Colts quarterback Carson Wentz. The Eagles released Pro Bowl defensive tackle Fletcher Cox but kept the centerpiece of its offensive line. As the moves continue, we will keep the updates coming.

NFC East

Dallas Cowboys

Offensive free agents

  • TE Dalton Schultz (franchise tag)
  • RB Corey Clement
  • WR Michael Gallup (re-signed)
  • WR Cedrick Wilson (Agreed to terms with the Dolphins)
  • WR Noah Brown
  • WR Malik Turner
  • OT La’el Collins (released)
  • OG Connor Williams (Agreed to terms with the Dolphins)
  • OL Ty Nsekhe
  • TE Jeremy Sprinkle
Dallas Cowboys WR Michael Gallup signed a five-year extension with the team this offseason.

Defensive free agents

  • S Jayron Kearse (re-signed)
  • S Damontae Kazee
  • S Malik Hooker (re-signed)
  • DB Maurice Canady
  • LB Leighton Vander Esch (re-signed)
  • DE Dorance Armstrong (re-signed)
  • DE Brent Urban
  • DT Carlos Watkins (re-signed)
  • LB Francis Bernard
  • LB Luke Gifford (re-signed)
  • P Bryan Anger (re-signed)
  • LS Jake McQuaide (re-signed)

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Re-worked DE DeMarcus Lawrence’s contract to an extension, re-signed DE Dorance Armstrong on a two-year deal, re-signed WR Michael Gallup on a five-year deal, re-signed S Malik Hooker on a two-year deal, re-signed LB Leighton Vander Esch on a one-year deal, re-signed LB Luke Gifford on a one-year deal, re-signed DT Carlos Watkins, re-signed S Jayron Kearse to a two-year deal, re-signed LS Jake McQuaide on a one-year deal, re-signed P Bryan Anger to a three-year deal
  • Agreed to terms with WR James Washington (Steelers) on a one-year deal, DE Dante Fowler (Falcons) on a two-year deal
  • Traded WR Amari Cooper to the Cleveland Browns in exchange for a 2022 fifth-round pick and they swapped 2022 sixth-round picks with the Browns
  • Lost OG Connor Williams (Dolphins), DE Randy Gregory (Broncos), WR Cedrick Wilson (Dolphins)
  • Placed the franchise tag on TE Dalton Schultz
  • Released OT La’el Collins, K Greg Zuerlein, WR Robert Foster, DB Reggie Robinson II, RB Ito Smith, TE Blake Jarwin

Washington Commanders

Offensive free agents

  • QB Ryan Fitzpatrick
  • QB Kyle Allen (Agreed to terms with the Texans)
  • WR-Ret DeAndre Carter
  • WR Dylan Cantrell
  • OT Cornelius Lucas (re-signed)
  • OC Jon Toth (re-signed)
  • OG Jamil Douglas (Agreed to terms with the Giants)
  • OL Ereck Flowers (released)
  • OG Brandon Scherff (Agreed to terms with the Jaguars)
  • WR Cam Sims (re-signed)
  • WR Adam Humphries
  • C Tyler Larsen (re-signed)
  • RB Jonathan Williams (re-signed)
  • RB J.D. McKissic (re-signed)
  • TE Ricky Seals-Jones (Agreed to terms with the Giants)

Defensive free agents

  • DT Tim Settle (Agreed to terms with the Bills)
  • DL Daniel Wise (re-signed)
  • DE Jalen Jelks
  • DL Matt Ioannidis (released and signed with Panthers)
  • S Troy Apke
  • LB Jon Bostic
  • LB Jared Norris
  • LB Nate Orchard
  • LB Milo Eifler (re-signed)
  • LB David Mayo (re-signed)
  • CB Darryl Roberts
  • CB Torry McTyer
  • CB Corn Elder
  • CB Danny Johnson (re-signed)
  • S Bobby McCain (re-signed)
  • S Deshazor Everett (released)

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Traded its third-round picks in the 2022 and 2023 NFL Draft for Indianapolis Colts QB Carson Wentz. The 2023 third-round pick could become a second rounder based on Wentz’s playing time in Washington. The teams also traded positions in the second round of the 2022 NFL Draft, as the team gave up the 42nd overall pick to move down five spots
  • Agreed to terms with OG Andrew Norwell (Jaguars), DE Efe Obada (Bills)
  • Re-signed S Bobby McCain to a two-year deal, RB J.D. McKissic, OC Jon Toth, RB Jonathan Williams, OT Cornelius Lucas, OC Tyler Larsen, LB David Mayo, LB Milo Eifler, WR Cam Sims, DL Daniel Wise, CB Danny Johnson,
  • Placed a RFA tender on K Joey Slye
  • Released DL Matt Ioannidis (signed with Panthers), OG Ereck Flowers, S Deshazor Everett
  • Lost OG Brandon Scherff (Jaguars), DT Tim Settle (Bills), QB Kyle Allen (Texans), TE Ricky Seals-Jones (Giants), OG Jamil Douglas (Giants)

New York Giants

Offensive free agents

  • QB Jake Fromm
  • QB Mike Glennon
  • WR C.J. Board (re-signed)
  • OT Korey Cunningham (re-signed)
  • TE Evan Engram (Agreed to terms with the Jaguars)
  • G Will Hernandez (Agreed to terms with the Cardinals)
  • FB Elijhaa Penny
  • FB Cullen Gillaspia
  • WR Dante Pettis
  • OL Billy Price
  • WR John Ross
  • OL Matt Skura
  • OT Nate Solder
  • TE Levine Toilolo
  • TE Kaden Smith
  • TE Kyle Rudolph (released)
  • RB Devontae Booker (released)
  • P Riley Dixon

Defensive free agents

  • LB Lorenzo Carter
  • CB Keion Crossen (Agreed to terms with the Dolphins)
  • S Nate Ebner
  • S J.R. Reed
  • DB Logan Ryan (released and then signed with the Buccaneers)
  • DB Steven Parker
  • DL Austin Johnson (Agreed to terms with the Chargers)
  • LB Benardrick McKinney
  • S Jabrill Peppers (Agreed to terms with the Patriots)
  • DB Logan Ryan (released and then signed with Buccaneers)
  • LB Reggie Ragland
  • DL Danny Shelton
  • LB Jaylon Smith
  • LS Casey Kreiter (re-signed)

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Re-signed OT Korey Cunningham, LS Casey Kreiter, WR C.J. Board
  • Agreed to terms with OG Mark Glowinski (Colts) on a three-year deal, QB Tyrod Taylor (Texans) on a two-year deal, OG Jon Feliciano (Bills), TE Ricky Seals-Jones (Commanders), WR Richie James (49ers), DT Justin Ellis (Ravens), DL Jihad Ward (Jaguars), RB Matt Breida (Bills), G Jamil Douglas (Commanders), OL Max Garcia (Cardinals)
  • Released DB Logan Ryan (signed by Buccaneeers), TE Kaden Smith, P Riley Dixon, RB Devontae Booker, TE Kyle Rudolph
  • Lost CB Keion Crossen (Dolphins), TE Evan Engram (Jaguars), DT Austin Johnson (Chargers), S Jabrill Peppers (Patriots), OG Will Hernandez (Cardinals)

Philadelphia Eagles

Offensive free agents

Defensive free agents

  • S Rodney McLeod
  • S Anthony Harris (re-signed)
  • LB Alex Singleton (Agreed to terms with the Broncos)
  • DE Derek Barnett (re-signed)
  • CB Steven Nelson
  • DT Hassan Ridgeway (Agreed to terms with the 49ers)
  • DE Ryan Kerrigan
  • OLB Genard Avery (Agreed to terms with the Steelers)
  • DT Fletcher Cox (released and then re-signed)

2022 Free Agency report/Other Notes:

  • Agreed to terms with GM Howie Roseman on a three-year extension
  • Re-signed OC Jason Kelce on a one-year deal, WR Greg Ward on a one-year deal, S Anthony Harris on a one-year deal, re-signed RB Boston Scott on a one-year deal, DE Derek Barnett to a two-year deal
  • Placed a RFA tender on OG Nate Herbig
  • Agreed to terms with DE-OLB Haason Reddick on a three-year deal, LB Kyzir White (Chargers), WR Zach Pascal (Colts)
  • Lost DT Hassan Ridgeway (49ers) , LB Alex Singleton (Broncos), OLB Genard Avery (Steelers)
  • Released DT Fletcher Cox and then re-signed him to a one-year deal

2021 NFL Draft Recap: NFC East

As you will see in our 2021 NFL Draft Recap, each team selected at least one edge rusher. You could say, The NFC East got defensive in the 2021 NFL Draft! Philadelphia and New York used first round draft picks (DeVonta Smith and Kadarius Toney) to help their young quarterbacks. The Dallas Cowboys and Washington Football Team already have veteran quarterbacks and they chose to add linebackers with versatility: Micah Parsons and Jamin Davis. However, there was more than just linebackers and receivers targeted, Washington, Philadelphia and Dallas selected offensive linemen. Will any of these players propel a division that didn’t have a team finish with over a .500 record in 2021?

Philadelphia Eagles     
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 10th overallPhiladelphia Eagles (From Dallas Cowboys)DeVonta Smith6’0 166 WR-Alabama1/1st RoundThe 2020 Heisman Trophy winner will get an opportunity to re-unite with his former QB too, just like Waddle and Chase earlier in the draft.
2nd round, 37th overallPhiladelphia EaglesLandon Dickerson6’6 326/C-Alabama56/2nd RoundDickerson presents a unique multiple skill-set for NFL teams, having started at four different offensive line positions. Availability has always been the concern for the former five-star recruit.
3rd round, 73rd overallPhiladelphia Eagles (From Carolina Panthers)Milton Williams6’3 284/DT-DE Louisiana Tech42/2nd RoundDue to Louisiana Tech’s lack of size on the three-man defensive front, he was used most frequently at the four-or-five-technique defensive end positions. He was also seen occasionally standing up to rush from an outside linebacker spot on third downs. There was a comfort level exhibited in his play to overpower some tackles and interior guards by dropping his shoulder, but he can play effectively with his hands to disengage.
4th round, 123rd overallPhiladelphia EaglesZech McPhearson5'11 195/CB-Texas Tech, Penn State152/3rd RoundMcPhearson, a former four-star recruit, was seen inside as a nickel. McPhearson displayed a good feel of reacting to motion, breaking downhill on the football and running with crossing routes.
5th round, 150th overallPhiladelphia EaglesKenneth Gainwell5’8 203 All-Purpose/Memphis125/3rd RoundGainwell is the mini-sized version of former Memphis running back/wide receiver Antonio Gibson (Washington Redskins). Whether he will have the type of impact at the next level is debatable, especially due to his relative lack of bulk.
6th round, 189th overallPhiladelphia EaglesMarlon Tuipulotu6'1 308/DT-USC320/4th RoundTuipulotu flashes in spots. Never was that more evident than in the first two games of the 2020 campaign, where he flashed improved quickness and burst getting off the snap. Too many times, however, he struggled to hold the point of attack versus double teams
6th round, 191th overallPhiladelphia EaglesTarron Jackson6'2 260/DE-Coastal Carolina124/3rd RoundJackson has a strong enough lower base and enough juice to handle run game assignments versus most tight ends and some offensive tackles. The All-Sun Belt defender contains enough length to jolt linemen with one-hand posts and uses those to set up his inside or outside arm-overs.
6th round, 224th overallPhiladelphia EaglesJaCoby Stevens6’2 216/S-LB-LSU266/4th RoundStevens, a former collegiate wide receiver, brings an intriguing skill-set to the NFL.
As a linebacker, he clearly is still learning the nuances of the position but -while doing so- can offer the ability to match tight ends. For that to happen, he has to attack run game concepts the same way he attacks blitz assignments.
7th round, 234th overallPhiladelphia EaglesPatrick Johnson6'2 240/OLB-Tulane251/4th RoundTulane’s all-time career sack leader does a fine job of creating angles and getting his feet pointed in a path towards the quarterback as a pass rusher. Offensive tackles have a tough time gaining an area on his frame to pin and prevent his upfield charge. 24.5 career QB sacks.
Dallas Cowboys
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 12th overallDallas Cowboys (from Philadelphia Eagles)Micah Parsons6’3 246 LB-Penn State2/1st RoundParsons’ speed goes with rare size at the position. He has a chance to develop in Dan Quinn’s system.
2nd round, 44th overallDallas CowboysKelvin Joseph5’11 1/2” 197/CB-Kentucky, LSU37/2nd RoundJoseph’s ability to squeeze routes from the outside-in in man or zone coverage is extremely impressive. There will be few cornerbacks in this year’s draft class with his level of fluidity. There were problems with communication in coverage.
3rd round, 75th overallDallas CowboysOsa Odighizuwa6’2 280/DT-UCLA106/3rd RoundHis feel for blocking schemes is inconsistent and he is still searching for secondary pass rush counters. Balance is something that needs to be monitored moving forward. At 280 pounds with 10 3/4-inch hands, it seems that he is destined for a role at defensive end in a three-man front.
3rd round, 84th overallDallas Cowboys (from Philadelphia Eagles)Chauncey Golston6’4 268/DE-Iowa74/3rd RoundGolston is easily one of the most valuable defensive lineman in this year’s draft. He can play the three-technique defensive tackle on passing downs, possible four-or-five-technique defensive end (three or four-man front) or rush as a stand-up outside linebacker. A veteran defensive coordinator may attempt to use the first-team All-Big Ten defender in all of the above-referenced roles.
3rd round, 99th overallDallas Cowboys (Compensatory Pick)Nahshon Wright6’4 188/CB-Oregon State357/5th RoundWright is a tall corner with good feet and a solid backpedal. His challenge will be to constrict his movements in tight areas when it is time to transition versus quicker receivers. For him to do that, he must find a happy medium between being comfortable and not playing too low. His feet don't always stay planted in the ground when flipping to open or break at 45-or-90-degree angles.
4th round, 115th overallDallas CowboysJabril Cox6’3 233/LB-LSU, North Dakota State46/2nd RoundHe has a number of similarities to former Washington LB Cory Littleton (Rams, Raiders) There were questions about Littleton’s pure physicality coming out of school. Cox’s size, body composition and pass coverage skills point to him being further advanced at this same stage.
4th round, 138th overallDallas Cowboys (Compensatory Pick)Josh Ball6’7 308/OT-Marshall, FSU215/4th RoundBall’s entire career has featured a number of up-and-downs, but his final two years at Marshall represented a modicum of consistency.
He is quick-footed, balanced and massive.
5th round, 178th overallDallas Cowboys (Compensatory Pick)Simi Fehoko6'4 224/WR-Stanford142/3rd RoundWe are impressed with how sudden Fehoko uses his stick moves to move the cornerback off the spot; particularly for a man of his size.
16 reps-225 lbs, 4.47 40-yd, 34 1/2” VJ
6th round, 192nd overallDallas Cowboys (from Detroit Lions)Quinton Bohanna6'4 345/DT-Kentucky262/4th RoundNFL bloodlines.
For a 350-pound defensive lineman, Bohanna will surprise with his quickness laterally to escape blockers. As a result, he has a tendency to get tied up leaning on interior offensive linemen due to inconsistent hand usage.
6th round, 227th overallDallas Cowboys (Compensatory Pick)Israel Mukuamu6'4 212/CB-South Carolina162/3rd RoundHas started at both safety and CB. Very good ball skills have shown up throughout his career.
7th round, 238th overallDallas CowboysMatt Farniok6’5 311/OL-Nebraska326/5th RoundIt was really no surprise that Farniok, a two-time team captain and four-time Academic All-Big Ten selection, displayed positional versatility in 2020. The team’s 2019 Offensive Lineman of the Year had developed into at least a serviceable right tackle before making the switch to right guard full-time in 2020.
New York Giants
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 20th overallNew York Giants (from Chicago Bears)Kadarius Toney5’11 189 All-Purpose/Florida49/2nd RoundHis ability to get in-and-out of traffic with the ball in his hands makes him a threat as an all-purpose prospect and slot WR.
2nd round, 50th overallNew York Giants (from Miami Dolphins)Azeez Ojulari6’2 249/DE-OLB Georgia45/2nd RoundOjulari is a defensive end/outside linebacker with underrated strength and positive hand usage. There were occasions where his size created limitations, but he generally exhibited satisfactory upper body strength.
3rd round, 71st overallNew York Giants (from Denver Broncos)Aaron Robinson5’11 190/Nickel-UCF, Alabama58/2nd RoundRobinson fits the bill of what you need at the nickel back posi-tion in today’s NFL. Some of the most popular NFL route concepts feature crossers, in-breaking dig patterns. Of all the corners or nickel backs in this year’s draft class, he closes distance on these types of concepts with the most urgency.
4th round, 116th overallNew York GiantsElerson G. Smith6’6 262/DE-Northern Iowa107/3rd RoundWe feel he gives teams options because he may be able to slide inside on third downs and play some three-technique defensive tackle. A viable argument can be made that his skill-set could actually be best served as a stand-up rush outside linebacker for 3-4 teams.
6th round, 196th overallNew York GiantsGary Brightwell6’1 218/RB-Arizona413/5th RoundBrightwell brought attitude to the table as a runner at the collegiate level. He combines decent vision with enough awareness in pass protection.
6th round, 201st overallNew York Giants (from Arizona Cardinals)Rodarius Williams6'0 189/CB-Oklahoma State197/4th RoundPlaying off-man could be a bit of a challenge as he has to transition from the junction limit in college football to the NFL. A solid prospect with NFL bloodlines, he is following in the footsteps of his younger brother, ‘Greedy’ Williams (Cleveland Browns)
Washington Football Team
SelectionTeamPlayer SelectionPosition- SchoolDN Big Board Rank/ GradeNotes
1st round, 19th overallWashington Football TeamJamin Davis6’4 234 LB-Kentucky61/2nd RoundHC Ron Rivera finds a linebacker who has the traits to become like the LBs he had in Carolina.
2nd round, 51st overallWashington Football TeamSamuel Cosmi6’6 314/OT-Texas62/2nd RoundCosmi has reserved a spot in scouts’ attention for the better portion of a two-year period. He’s balanced, quick and fluid in his movements at the left tackle spot.
3rd round, 74th overallWashington Football TeamBenjamin St. Juste6’3 205/CB-Minnesota, Michigan192/4th RoundHis footwork is clean, and this is why he was able to defend so effectively in the Red Zone. Ball skills are important. St. Juste didn’t have any interceptions, but he played through his inside shoulder to stay in-phase with wideouts in this part of the field.
3rd round, 82nd overallWashington Football TeamDyami Brown6’1 189/WR-UNC86/3rd RoundThe former prep level 200-meter sprinter tracks the football over either shoulder and has shown good spatial awareness along the back end lines or sidelines. He has solid body control to adjust to poorly thrown passes. The biggest issue teams will have regarding the first-team All-ACC speedster revolves around the concentration lapses. They came in the form of penalties and dropped passes.
4th round, 124th overallWashington Football TeamJohn Bates6’5 259/TE-Boise State226/4th RoundBates is a smooth tight end with excellent size, deceptive stride length and good catch radius for the position. He has been used as an insert blocker in school, down tight end and occasional flexed-out slot receiver.
5th round, 163rd overallWashington Football TeamDarrick Forrest6'0 200/S-Cincinnati136/3rd RoundWhile teammate James Wiggins has received quite a bit of attention while in school, Forrest was a steady hand with the Bearcats. Forrest is instinctive, plays fast, disguises coverage and contributes on all four downs.
6th round, 225th overallWashington Football Team (from Philadelphia Eagles compensatory selection)Cameron Cheeseman6’4 237/LS-Michigan565/N/APosted a 0.69 second long snap on his first
snap of the 2020 Citrus Bowl (1st QTR/14:09). Posted a .72 long snap on his second punt (1st QTR/11:56, Alabama ‘20). Challenged by pure foot speed in coverage.
7th round, 240th overallWashington Football Team (from Philadelphia Eagles)William Bradley-King6’3 254/DE-OLB-Arkansas State161/3rd RoundOne of the things that Bradley-King will have to do better at the next level revolves around timing snap counts. This is something that we think he should be able to correct. We think his effort and tenacity have been first-rate dating back to his time at Arkansas State.
7th round, 246th overallWashington Football TeamShaka Toney6’3 238/DE-Penn State195/4th RoundThere is some polish to Toney's pass rushing skill-set, but his size gets him swallowed up by bigger tackles. The positive is that he has enough wingspan and length to go to pole moves from time-to-time and that may be able to set up some of his counters.
7th round, 258th overallWashington Football Team (from Miami Dolphins)Dax Milne6’0 193/WR-BYU266/4th RoundIn studying Milne, it is important to watch him as he gets into the fourth or fifth steps of his route. Often times, he begins to idle his stride to gauge the defensive back’s technique before re-accelerating.

2020 NFL Draft recap: NFC East

Dallas Cowboys Notable picks: With the deflection of former starter Byron Jones, the team went with a player who contains similar length in Diggs. He is certainly more of a ballhawk, but can he provide the consistency in coverage that Jones gave them over a two-year period. It will be worth monitoring the development of Robinson II. His profile may actually be closer to Jones’ than Diggs.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (17) CeeDee Lamb6’2 198
WR-Oklahoma
11/1st Round Lamb has all of the requisite tools to win with both savvy and quickness as a route runner. He has a solid set of tools to be a complement within the Dallas passing game initially. We expect him to see some time in the slot.
2 (51) Trevon Diggs6’1 205
CB-Alabama
84/2nd Round Diggs brings more than NFL bloodlines to the table. He is aggressive getting his hands on WRs at the line of scrimmage. Finding a balance in that aggression and bringing it to run support will ramp up his development.
3 (82) Neville Gallimore6’2 304 DT-Oklahoma143/3rd Round Gallimore had some issues with balance in school and that is probably why he lasted until this spot in the draft. For a player with his level of quickness and power, it was a bit surprising that he didn’t make more plays in school.
4 (123) Reggie Robinson II6’1 205 CB-Tulsa93/3rd Round Robinson II didn’t get the ink of some of the other big CBs in this year’s draft and maybe that should not come as a surprise. He has always been competitive in coverage and finished better in 2019.
4 (146) Tyler Biadasz6’4 314 OC-Wisconsin59/2nd RoundBiadasz was not a dominator in school but he was assignment-sound. The former prep level baseball player led an offensive line that was ravaged by graduation from 2018 and did so admirably.
5 (179)Bradlee Anae6’3 257
DE-Utah
100/3rd Round Due to sub-standard edge rusher workout times Anae fell in the draft. This came after a dominant Senior Bowl showing that showcased his feel for getting off the ball.
7 (220)Ben DiNucci6’2 210
QB-James Madison, Pittsburgh
555/7th RoundDiNucci’s moxie may have influenced this selection. The former Pitt Panther quietly was a couple of inches away from leading the Dukes to a national championship in 2019.
Utah’s Bradlee Anae (No. 6 pictured) forces a fumble versus Northwestern running back Isaiah Bowser (No. 25 picutred) in the fourth quarter. He finished 2018 with 51 tackles, eight quarterback sacks, 15.5 tackles for losses, two forced fumbles and three pass break-ups. The Cowboys selected Anae in the fifth round of the 2020 NFL Draft (179th overall).
New York Giants Notable pick: The team would be satisfied if Holmes can come in and lock down a nickel role within their scheme. The team has quietly assembled enough size on the edges, so it will be imperative for him to learn the various roles of an inside position while also contributing on special teams.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (4) Andrew Thomas6’5 317
OT-Georgia
6/1st RoundThomas has the occasional top-heavy look but he remains relatively consistent establishing a lockout on the perimeter. He won’t be able to get by with relatively in the NFL and his overall
2 (40) Xavier McKinney6’0 201
S-Alabama
41/2nd Round McKinney will be able to play a variety of roles for the Giants just like he did with the Crimson Tide. His best characteristic comes from his pre-snap cognitive ability in diagnosing the opposition’s intentions.
3 (71) Matt Peart6’5 312
OT-UConn
72/2nd Round Peart is by no means a finished product, but that doesn’t mean starting is out of the question. He is most comfortable at RT, but he has started on both sides of the OL in school.
4 (110) Darnay Holmes5’10 195
CB-UCLA
112/3rd Round Holmes lack of width (69-inch wingspan) hurt his cause and forced him to fall. Penalties were a bit of an issue in 2019 but he found a way to compete week-to-week.
5 (150) Shane Lemieux6’4 310
OG-Oregon
299/4th Round You will not find many arguments surrounding Lemieux’s work ethic and determination. He was a consistent presence at OG for the Ducks over a four-year period. He finished his career with 52 consecutive starts.
6 (183) Cam Brown6’5 233
LB-Penn State
210/4th Round Brown has been used to run up the seams with TEs, cover down over the slot and off the edge as an occasional rush artist. He seemed to be most comfortable in school filtering back inside from an overhang LB spot.
New York Giants first-round pick Andrew Thomas (No. 71 pictured) started at both right and left tackle for the ‘Dawgs during his three-year stay in Athens.
7 (218)
Carter Coughlin
6’3 236
LB-Minnesota
286/4th Round
Coughlin finished his career with 22 QB sacks and 40 TFLs. When you combine that with his 4.57 speed, then the team may have gotten a core special teams contributor. He starred on the kickoff team way back in 2016 (see Holiday Bowl).
7 (238)
Tremari “T.J.” Brunson
6’1 230
LB-South Carolina
392/5th Round
Brunson may not completely fit the bill in terms of size, but he does play bigger than his measurements. He had some lower body extremity issues in school, but he appeared in 49 games (283 tackles, 21 TFLs).

7 (247)

Chris Williamson
6’0 205
NB/S-Minnesota, Florida
421/5th Round
Williamson was often tasked with covering fast slot WRs one-on-one and held his own. Hand placement is an issue but his work as a blitzer shows promise. The former Florida Gator should compete favorably in training camp.
7 (255)
Tae Crowder
6’3 235 (E)
LB-Georgia
463/6th Round
Crowder showed time-and-time again that he is capable of chasing plays down laterally. He leaves some tackle opportunities on the field because he does not always get his head across the bow of the opponent.
Philadelphia Eagles Notable pick:  Reagor has a role to fill in the team’s offense as the Wild Card type of player. If he can execute a variety of different responsibilities, then the Eagles will be able to use his elusive skill set to maximize one-on-one matchups on a down-to-down basis.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (21) Jalen Reagor5’11 205
All-purpose-TCU
49/2nd Round Reagor simply needs to find his way as a route runner to take advantage of his outstanding physical tools. He runs well after the catch, tracks the ball down the field and makes defenders miss in space.
2 (53)Jalen Hurts6’1 222
QB-Oklahoma, Alabama 
127/3rd Round Hurts earned kudos at both collegiate stops for his leadership, poise and overall strength. It would not be a shock to see him involved in a number of packages as a rookie.
3 (103)Davion Taylor6’0 224
LB-Colorado
225/4th Round The Pac-12 100-meter sprinter runs in the 4.4s, closes ground on routes in front of him and actually finds a way to be active week-to-week. He simply needs more repetitions. We think he has special teams core (all four teams) potential at the next level. The team will likely incorporate him into some of its nickel/dime packages.
4 (127)K’Von Wallace5’11 206 DB-Clemson82/2nd RoundWallace didn’t always finish interception opportunities in school, but he did often put himself into good position in one-on-one situations. His ability to time his entries in the run game was subsidized by consistent one-on-one coverage in the slot.
4 (145)Jack Driscoll6’5 307
OT-Auburn, UMass
221/4th RoundDriscoll continued to get better during school and his footwork was an area of focus. Now he needs to concentrate on gaining more core strength to handle speed-to-power in the NFL. This will be the case at either OG or OT, where he hopes to win a seventh or eighth role in 2020.
5 (168)John Hightower6’1 185
All-purpose-
Boise State
259/4th Round Hightower continued to improve every year in school but finally put it all together in 2019. For a team that went into the draft wanting to add speed at WR, Hightower has some capabilities.
6 (196)Shaun Bradley6’1 235
LB-Temple
196/4th Round Bradley has some footwork issues to clean up at the exchange LB spot. However, he will add plenty of speed to a defense and special teams unit that values quality backups.
6 (200)Quez Watkins6’0 185
WR-Southern Miss
124/3rd RoundSpeed is the name of the game in the pass-happy NFL, and Watkins brings plenty of it to the table. He seemed to build to an even different top gear with the ball in his hands on quick RPO slants and posts. Now he needs to work on getting off of press coverage.
Philadelphia Eagles sixth-round pick Quez Watkins concluded his impressive three-year run at Southern Miss by averaged 18.2 yards per reception as a junior (1,145 yards, 6 TDs).
6 (210)
Prince Tega Wanogho
6’5 308
OT-Auburn
141/3rd Round
Tega Wanogho did not have a chance to show off his impressive tools in the postseason. At this point in the process, the team could afford to take a flyer on a player who may not reach his peak for another three-year period.
7 (233)
Casey Toohill
6’4 250
OLB-Stanford
260/4th Round
Toohill is a fast, athletic long LB with enough speed to play multiple spots. Coverage is a question mark, as is his ability to transfer speed-to-power as a pass rusher.
Washington Redskins Notable pick: Although the Redskins have a number of different types of receivers on its roster, there is no one other than Cam Sims that contains Gandy-Golden’s size. If he can transition effectively to the NFL, it could open up the team’s Red Zone offense.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (2) Chase Young6’5 264
DE-Ohio State
2/1st Round The Redskins are hoping that Young turns into not only a transformational player but that he can also open up possibilities for the talented Montez Sweat and Ryan Kerrigan on the other side. He may see time at DT on third downs.
3 (66)Antonio Gibson6’0 223
All-Purpose-Memphis
25/2nd Round There simply aren’t players with the size/speed quotient that Gibson brings to the table at 228 pounds. It would not be a shock to see the team use im in the backfield as a dot RB, slot WR or even outside receiver. The all-purpose dynamo produced without a lot of touches in school.
4 (108)Saahdiq Charles6’4 303
OT-LSU
189/4th RoundCharles bends, latches and slides effectively. What he hasn’t been able to do is stay on the field. Whether it was a suspension, injury or otherwise, the former Tiger was not dependable week-to-week. Perhaps the NFL opportunity will change his tunes.
4 (142)  Antonio Gandy-Golden6’4 223
WR-Liberty
95/3rd RoundGandy-Golden didn’t necessarily perform as well during the testing portion of the postseason as he did on the field. It will not come as a shock if he develops into the team’s primary Red Zone threat early in his career.
5 (156)Keith Ismael 6’3 309
OC-San Diego State
113/3rd RoundIsmael -a junior-entry- probably would have not gone much higher in next year’s draft and that may have influenced his decision to come out early. His quickness (and experience at three positions) will add another layer to the Redskins running game.
5 (162)Khaleke Hudson5’11 224
S/LB-Michigan
263/4th Round Hudson may have gotten dinged because he doesn’t really have a true position at the next level. At least, not yet. We think he can be a sub-package LB with enough zone capability to cover the flats and beyond.
Washington Redskins fifth-round draft pick Khaleke Hudson blocked five kicks during his career at Michigan.
7 (216)
Kamren Curl
6’1 206
S-Arkansas

150/3rd Round
Curl – a former cornerback- plays faster on the field than he times in T-shirts and shorts. He reacts to what he sees on the football field and plays with anticipation.
7 (226)
James Smith-Williams
6’3 265
DE-NC State
310/5th Round
Smith-Williams was probably as accomplished off the field as he was on it. A subpar senior year caused the workout warrior to slip in the draft, but injuries were probably more of the cause. However, Ron Rivera has had success with these types of DL (see Mario Addison) in the past.

2019 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: NFC East

The New York Giants had the sixth overall pick of the 2019 NFL Draft and selected former Duke quarterback Daniel Jones.  Their selection set off a series of events in what shapes up to be a very competitive division in 2019.  We take a look at every pick in the division made this past weekend.

NFC EAST

Hill (No. 9 pictured), the Dallas Cowboys second-round selection, actually starred as a 320-pound freshman defensive end under former defensive coordinator Erik Chinander.

Dallas Cowboys Notable picks: Hill may be the pick that the team looks back on eventually with a smile.  His immense athleticism could provide matchup problems from the inside in Year 1.  Pollard’s play speed varies, but his downhill running style gives the team options in the return game.
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (58) Trysten Hill UCF 74/2nd Round We talked to one anonymous offensive coordinator who stated that “Hill was the best defensive lineman they had seen.”  This same coordinator had also faced other top-notch Power 5 defenses.  It lays credence to the amount of talent that the 300-plus pound Hill possesses.
3 (90) Connor McGovern OG/Penn State 98/3rd Round The Cowboys had a revolving door at the left guard spot in 2018 and McGovern- a former U.S. Army All-American-got on the field early for the Nittany Lions, starting nine games as a freshman.  He is a bully on the football field who works better at guard than center.
4 (128) Tony Pollard All-Purpose/Memphis 161/3rd Round The NCAA’s all-time leading kickoff returner in terms of TD returns was also an effective dot running back and slot receiver.  He could be a steal in the fourth round.  Career Stats: 4,860 all-purpose yards-139 carries for 941 yards (6.8 YPC) and 9 TDs; 104 receptions for 1,292 yards (12.4 YPR) and 9 TDs; 87 KOR, 2,616 yards (30.1 yds/KR) and an NCAA-record 7 KR TDs
5 (158) Michael Jackson CB/Miami (Fla.) 149/3rd Round Jackson had a solid two-year run for the Hurricanes subsidized by an above average showing during 2019 East-West Shrine practices.  He is a very good challenger versus wide receivers, particularly bigger receiving targets. He is a cornerback that does better versus outside releases than inside releases in press-man.
5 (165) Joe Jackson DE/

Miami (Fla.)

180/3rd Round Jackson can be a bit unorthodox in his style, making it tough for offensive tackles to gauge his techniques.  Despite some stiffness, he posted 138 tackles, 24 QB sacks, 37.5 TFLs, 5 FFs, 2 FRs, INT and 5 PBUs in 39 games.
6 (213) Donovan Wilson S/Texas A&M 168/3rd Round Wilson came to Texas A&M with a reputation for turning the ball over and didn’t disappoint in school.  A long defender, his versatility extended to the nickel, cornerback and safety spots in school.
7 (218)

Acquired from Oakland

Mike Weber RB/Ohio State 347/5th Round The former U.S. Army All-American got off to a hot start in Columbus, but that has since cooled down after a rash of nagging lower extremity injuries lingered over a two-year period.
7 (241)

 

Jalen Jelks DE/Oregon 174/3rd Round Jelks, a former high school interior DL, can move around the defensive front with ease.  He is more athletic than his testing numbers suggest. 

New York Giants first-round draft pick Daniel Jones’ 85-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver T.J. Rahming in the 2018 Independence Bowl was one of five touchdown passes in a career-best performance.

 

New York Giants Notable picks: Although the Giants made several good selections, this entire draft will ultimately come down to how the team transitions from Eli Manning to Daniel Jones.  GM Dave Gettleman and his scouting department deserve credit for getting early-round value with Love, the Slaytons and Ballentine. For the second straight year, Gettleman decided to draft a player from Georgia’s defense (2018-Lorenzo Carter, third round).
Round,

Selection

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (6) Daniel Jones Duke 73/2nd Round The Giants believe that Jones can be an Eli Manning-clone, but perhaps with better athleticism.  Jones started 36 games in his career and finished it with six touchdowns in an MVP performance in the 2018 Independence Bowl.
1 (17)

Acquired from the Cleveland Browns in the Odell Beckham, Jr. and Olivier Vernon trade

Dexter Lawrence Clemson 9/1st Round After taking its heir apparent to Eli Manning early, the Giants decide to bet on the third Clemson DL to go off on the board.  Can Lawrence return to his 2016 ACC Rookie of the Year form?  It may not matter.  He will line up over the center in the team’s three-man fronts and occasionally line up over offensive guards in their four-man looks.
1 (30)

Acquired from the Seattle Seahawks

Deandre Baker Georgia 36/2nd Round Baker’s toughness will be a good fit for the Giants.  He has a chance to vie for a starting role in Year 1.  The big key for him will be finding a balance in transition during the move area for wide receivers (12-to-16 yards). 
3 (95) Oshane Ximines DE/Old Dominion 148/3rd Round Ximines (Troy Jefferson’s Player to Watch in our 2018 Old Dominion preview)  has plenty of the characteristics needed to produce as a 30-front outside linebacker.  While only an adequate bender, he uses a quick-footed nature to escape offensive tackles.   He seemed most comfortable rushing from the right side in the film viewed.
4 (108) Julian Love CB/Notre Dame 68/2nd Round Love’s gambling style resulted in a number of pick-six opportunities in 2017, and he finished on most of them.  The consensus All-American has outstanding instincts and quickness. 
5 (143) Ryan Connelly LB/Wisconsin 237/4th Round Connelly’s toughness shined through the entire 2018 season.  Despite playing through injury, he produced at nearly the exact level as he had in 2017. He is not a thumper but is capable of getting low to tackle.  Connelly ends up getting the draft call over partner and All-Big Ten linebacker T.J. Edwards.
5 (171) Darius Slayton WR/Auburn 127/3rd Round Speed is a big part of the equation whenever a receiver averages 20 yards per catch over a three-year period.  Slayton has no problems running by defensive backs.  He caught three passes for 163 yards and three touchdowns in the 2018 Music City Bowl. His body language gives away intermediate route concepts because he doesn’t come off the ball with consistent forward lean.
6 (180) Corey Ballentine CB/Washburn 50/2nd Round He has excellent feet, hip flexibility, toughness and return skills.  Working on staying lower in his backpedal will put yet another tool in his toolbox, but he already can close distances from a variety of angles.
7 (232)

Acquired from Minnesota

George Asafo-Adjei OL/Kentucky 583/6th Round Plus size.  Praised for his versatility within the program.  Heavy puncher. Although he started primarily at the right tackle spot, he can backup several positions.  His impressive Pro Day performance likely earned him a draft slot. 
7 (245)

Acquired from Los Angeles

Chris Slayton DL-Syracuse 123/3rd Round It could be argued that the 700-pound squatter has as much lower body strength as the team’s 17th overall pick in Lawrence. He is not an accomplished pass rusher but he finished his career with 32.5 tackles for losses. Despite the Orange winning 10 games in 2018, Slayton was the team’s only draft pick.

 

Ohio State quarterback Dwayne Haskins passed for 4,831 yards (70%), 50 touchdowns and eight interceptions in 2018.

Washington Redskins Notable picks: Haskins may carry a bit of a chip on his shoulder due to his slight fall simply because the Giants play in the same division.  It will be fun to track future Jones versus Haskins matchups.  He will pair up with his Buckeye teammate McLaurin in the third round, and we felt that he carried second-round value.  Harmon could become grand larceny in the sixth round, as could either Moreland or Brailford in the seventh.  Bruce Allen and Doug Williams put together a well-constructed draft designed to grab another pass rusher, a future quarterback and more competition at receiver.  Linebacker is still a question mark for the team entering 2019, especially after the release of Zach Brown.  There will be a lot of pressure on Reuben Foster to finally come into his own.
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (15) Dwayne Haskins Ohio State 27/2nd Round Haskins passed for 50 touchdowns in his only year as a starter at the collegiate level.  He provides insurance in case Alex Smith is unable to return from a catastrophic leg injury in 2018.  The All-Big Ten signal-caller will compete with former Broncos QB Case Keenum.
1 (26)

Acquired from Indianapolis

Montez Sweat Mississippi State 8/1st Round The Redskins needed to upgrade their pass rush and Sweat was likely the best player left on its board. Aside from dynamic testing numbers, the former Michigan State Spartan stood out over the last two years on the field for the Bulldogs with underrated effort.
3 (76) Terry McLaurin WR/Ohio State 30/2nd Round McLaurin caught 11 TD passes from Dwayne Haskins in 2018.   After a strong Senior Bowl week of practices which clearly defined him as the week’s best route runner, it leaves one to wonder what his production would have been like as its No. 1 featured receiver.  Aside from the ability to win off the line of scrimmage, he is one of the better gunners in this year’s draft.  He finished his career with 17 tackles.
4 (112) Bryce Love RB/Stanford 110/3rd Round Love went nearly exactly at his position on our Big Board, but he may have gone much higher if he had not suffered an ACL injury late in the year. Ankle issues were also a concern during his career. The fact that he carried the ball 97 less times as a senior may have saved him wear-and-tear in the minds of some entering this year’s draft.
4 (131) Wes Martin OG/Indiana N/A The Hoosiers team captain may have surprised some by going ahead of teammate Brandon Knight.  His ability to create forward movement in the run game may be underrated.  Martin did 38 reps at 225 pounds on his Pro Day.
5 (153) Ross Pierschbacher OC/Alabama 314/4th Round It is not often that a high profile offensive lineman from the state of Iowa gets out of the state.  Pierschbacher more than justified his national ranking as a prep level lineman.  He has solid initial quickness, positive on-field movement and decent overall awareness.  He will need some help if left on an island versus elite interior pass rushers.
5 (173) Cole Holcomb LB/UNC 272/4th Round Despite being a good overall athlete, the second-team All-ACC linebacker did not have one scholarship offer coming out of high school.  The former soccer player has good feet on the field.  He is a bit of a pumped up 230-plus pounds.  A workout warrior, he caught the attention of NFL scouts with his 4.46 speed, 6.77 3-cone and 4.15 20-yard short shuttle times in pre-draft workouts.  He also went 11-feet in the broad jump.
6 (206) Kelvin Harmon WR/NC State 108/3rd Round Harmon says he likes Michael Thomas (Saints) because their frames are similar. We think he plays the game at the right clip.  His play strength and 218-pound frame make it  tough for defensive backs to work through and around.  He is a grinder who could stick.
7 (227) Jimmy Moreland CB-Nickel/James Madison 164/3rd Round There is really not much more Moreland could have done while at James Madison.  He covered instinctively, was willing in run support and finished plays on the ball as well as any cornerback in the 2019 NFL Draft class. He finished his career with 18 interceptions (363 yards, 6 TDs), but he was knocked for his 73 1/4-inch wingspan.
7 (253) Jordan Brailford DE-OLB/Oklahoma State 171/3rd Round Brailford did exactly what he was supposed to do during the 2019 postseason.  At every turn he not only met expectations, but often exceeded them.  This was even evident when he showed up over 250 pounds at the 2019 NFL Combine.  On the field, he put up 28 tackles for losses the last two years with efficient work using roll moves, slithering gaps on line games and an occasional inside club.

 

 

Miller (No. 48 pictured), Penn State’s Co-MVP in 2018, posted 12.5 quarterbacks and 26 tackles for loss over the last two seasons.

 

Philadelphia Eagles Notable pick:  For a team that prides itself on pass rushers, the team’s fourth-round pick in Miller has a chance to be more than what many may bargain for.  While his statistics don’t represent it, he was always at his best versus the best competition. For the second straight year, the Eagles take a defensive end with upside in the fourth round (2018-Josh Sweat).
Round,

Selection,

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (22)

Acquired from the Baltimore Ravens  in exchange for its 25th overall pick

Andre Dillard OT/Washington State 13/1st Round Dillard has the ability to pass protect at a high level and he will be tasked to become the team’s bookend opposite Lane Johnson. After being a serviceable Pac-12 tackle in a pass-happy offense, will his workout numbers translate to becoming a dominant force on the field? 
2 (53)

Acquired from Baltimore

Miles Sanders RB/Penn State 49/2nd Round Sanders came to Penn State ranked as the No. 1 running back in the entire country by several recruiting services.  He is adequate in blitz pick-up and -although largely unproven as a route runner- possesses soft hands.  As he moves on to the NFL, he will become more aware of his ball security.
2 (57) J.J. Arcega-Whiteside WR/Stanford 100/3rd Round Arcega-Whiteside, the 2014 South Carolina Gatorade Player of the Year, and former high school basketball standout, brings a high-flying style to the field.  It will be important for the Eagles to move him around some, like they did at Stanford. 
4 (138) Shareef Miller DE/Penn State 138/4th Round Miller -a junior-entry who ranked 138th on our Big Board- could prove to be a better pro than collegian.  He is better with his hand in the dirt than out of a two-point stance and often translates speed-to-power on line games and stunts.  He bought into DL coach Sean Spencer’s various techniques the last two seasons.
5 (167)

Acquired from New England via Los Angeles via Kansas City

Clayton Thorson QB/Northwestern 178/3rd Round His moxie, arm strength, athleticism and overall pocket presence complement above average size. He won 35 of his 53 career games in school and was 3-1 as a starter in bowl games (didn’t finish the Music City Bowl).  He did, however, bring his team back from a 20-3 deficit in the 2018 Holiday Bowl. 

2019 NFL Draft: Cornering the market

The 2019 NFL Draft has long been lauded for a deep class of interior and exterior defensive linemen. One position -although devoid of Top 10 talent- that has unique depth is the cornerback spot. We take a look at three players from that position group.

Justin Layne 6’2 185 Michigan State

Layne has a smooth style accompanied by defensive end-like arm length (33″). The former college wide receiver posted 30 touchdowns as a prep level star at Benedictine High School (Ohio). For a taller corner, he flips his hips relatively well in man-to-man coverage. We were surprised at his ability to react off of the wide receiver’s block of the safety in crack-and-replace situations to tackle.

The former Spartan needs to monitor allowing his motor-press technique turning into a backpedal at the line of scrimmage. This has allowed easy access on quick slants. On the plus side, however, this same technique keeps him in the hip pocket of receivers. In these instances, he is adept at playing through the hands of wideouts with his back turned to the quarterback in man-to-man coverage (PBU, 4th QTR/5:07, Utah State; PBU, 4th QTR/5:07, Penn State vs. Johnson).

NFL teams hold Layne in relatively high regard and we expect him to possibly come off the board at least by the end of Day 2 next weekend.

Corey Ballentine 5’11 196 Washburn

Ballentine averaged nearly 31 yards per kickoff return as a junior at the Division II level. In 46 career games, he forced four fumbles and displayed a knack for blocking kicks (three in 2018). The first-team All-MIAA performer uses adequate technique in press-man coverage and has shown the ability to close on crossing routes that break away from him. Despite recording just five interceptions in school, he has a natural feel and comfort finding the football due to his footwork, hip flexibility and confident disposition.

Ballenine posted a 10.51 100-meter time for the Washburn track & field squad. The 2018 Cliff Harris Award winner posted an 11’3″ broad jump at the 2019 NFL Combine.

For him to transition from the D2 level to the pros, the 2018 Cliff Harris Award winner will have to concentrate on playing a little bit lower in his stance. This would eliminate him from reacting too dramatically to hard jab steps, which he has a tendency to do on occasion. Teams that have Ballentine in mind will be comforted by the fact that he was a part of the team’s kickoff and punt return units, while also returning the kickoffs referenced earlier. The former Washburn track & field sprinter posted a 21.2-second time in the 200-meters while in school.

Jordan Brown 6’0 201 South Dakota State

We were fortunate to see Brown play in person during the team’s playoff contest against Kennesaw State in December 2018 and we were impressed with his down-to-down awareness. The Jackrabbits team captain is another former wide receiver with the skills to play off-man or bump-and-run.

Brown (pictured pointing) finished his career with 148 tackles, 6 TFLs, 4 FFs, 8 INTs and 27 PBUs. He was a two-time first-team All-MVFC selection and AP third-team All-American in 2018.

The Kennesaw State contest required him to play disciplined football because of the Owls’ diverse triple-option attack. His fourth quarter plant-and-drive on a quick three-step hitch created a tip that was intercepted by a teammate. The turnover sealed the game for the team. He believed his indicators and drove on the football with force. We were not as impressed with his inability to protect his thigh boards in this game, but he has exhibited solid tackling technique on film. Maintaining eye control will be key for Brown in his next level ascension (see Southern Illinois ’18).

Washington Redskins vs Philadelphia Eagles, 12-3-18: In-game report

Washington was not able to overcome another lost at quarterback while Philadelphia relied on their passing game to improve their playoff positioning. Philadelphia topped Washington, 28-13, on Monday Night Football in a pivotal division matchup. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

Redskins quarterback position

Washington thought Colt McCoy, who has been with the Redskins since 2014, could stabilize the offense after Alex Smith went down two weeks ago.  However, McCoy fractured his fibula against the Eagles, which leaves the Redskins with Mark Sanchez at quarterback.  Sanchez’s command of the offense was limited because of his inexperience with head coach Jay Gruden’s attack. Sanchez completed 13-of-21 passes for 100 yards and an interception.  But as was evident on a wide receiver toss gone wrong, where Sanchez frantically pitched it to wide receiver Jamison Crowder, the Washington Redskins new starting quarterback has a long way to go before he is ready to run the offense.

“We tried to get him comfortable,” Gruden said during the postgame press conference. 

It will be a short week for the Redskins, who will play against the Giants on Sunday.  Look for them to bring in a backup quarterback who has been with Gruden before, like Josh Johnson. 

Zach Ertz

Philadelphia tight end Zach Ertz should be mentioned with some of the best tight ends in the game.  The former Stanford product has 93 receptions for 978 yards and six touchdowns on the season.  The 93 catches are an Eagles franchise record.

“To set the record at home is obviously very special,”  Ertz said after the game against the Redskins.  “At the same time, the most important thing for me tonight was getting the win.”

Against Washington, Ertz caught nine passes on 10 targets for 83 yards.  As he has done all season, Ertz proved to be too fast for the Redskins inside linebackers, who tried to matchup with him and against smaller cornerbacks and safeties, he was able to use his 6’5 250 frame to box out and out leverage defensive backs. 

Jason Kelce

The Eagles best weapon on offense might play center.  Jason Kelce (6’3, 295) is one of the smaller centers in the NFL but he is able to move like a tight end. The Eagles center is a terror on screens because he is able to get downfield in a hurry and pave the way for screens like he did twice against the Redskins. On a second quarter touchdown, Carson Wentz threw a screen to Darren Sproles, Kelce’s 15 yard block downfield against Redskins linebacker Mason Foster led to the score.