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Baltimore Ravens 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA recap

Ravens GM Eric DeCosta came away with potential impact players at nearly every position. At safety, the team got an instant starter in Hamilton and potentially another impact defender in Ojabo, who may be a year away from contributing. Linderbaum should be ready to compete for the center position and, if so, then Patrick Mekari and Trystan Colon-Castillo should battle for a backup spot.

Baltimore Ravens       
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (14)Kyle Hamilton
S/Notre Dame
15/1st Round
Hamilton multi-purpose skill-set can be used in a number of different facets and that will only expand the fabric of the team's defensive capabilities. He should assume the role left behind by former safety DeShon Elliott.
1 (25)
Acquired this pick from the Philadelphia Eagles for its 22nd overall pick
Tyler Linderbaum
OC/Iowa
38/2nd Round
Linderbaum has shown more than enough in a pro-style collegiate scheme. As long as his size doesn't prove to be a detriment, then he has a chance to turn into an instant starter.
2 (45)
David Ojabo
DE-OLB/Michigan
64/2nd Round
If not for an Achilles injury on Michigan's Pro Day, he may have gone higher. New DC Mike Macdonald contained a unique feel of what Ojabo brings to the table.
3 (76)

Travis Jones
OT/UConn
44/2nd Round
Jones contains the skill to work over the center as a zero-or-one-technique NG, but he can play over an OG at the three-technique on occasion.
4 (110)
Daniel Faalele
OT/Minnesota
50/2nd Round
Faelele's light-footed nature makes him hard to get around if the DE doesn't time the snap count. His weight will only become a factor if he doesn't keep himself under the 400-pound mark.
4 (119)
Jalyn Armour-Davis
CB/
Alabama
136/3rd Round
Armour-Davis took some of the shine from more-heralded teammate Josh Jobe in 2021. The time he took away from the field to develop were offset by durability hiccups. He could serve the nickel role for the Ravens on the outside.
4 (128)
Charlie Kolar
TE/Iowa State
115/3rd Round
Kolar has the savvy, ball skills and Red Zone productivity to match the size. To play for Baltimore the blocking has to be in place. This is the worst part of his game at this point.
4 (130)
Jordan Stout
P/Penn State
435/5th Round
Perhaps the best directional punter in this year's class, Stout's ability to execute fakes (see Michigan), kick the longer field goals and kickoff made him one of the most versatile specialists in this year's class.
4 (139)Isaiah Likely
TE/Coastal Carolina
92/3rd Round
Likely's field speed, run after the catch skill and size complement satisfactory blocking skills when on the move.
4 (141)Damarion "Pepe" Williams
CB-Nickel/Houston
194/4th Round
Williams was one of the more aggressive players from the secondary in this year's draft despite standing 5'10, 183 pounds. He can play corner, nickel or safety if needed. His change of direction is outstanding at any of the positions.
6 (196) Tyler Badie
RB/Missouri
177/4th Round
Badie registered rush totals of 34, 27 and 41 over a three-game stretch in 2021. His workhorse capability won't be needed in Baltimore, where he will have to fight for a roster spot in a deep room.
UDFA 2022 signings
Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRound‘Nasty ’Take
121Zakoby McClainLBAuburn5.8433rd RoundCan McClain fill a role that was never replaced on the Ravens defense by former LB Kenny Young?
192Makai PolkWRMississippi State, California5.654th RoundPolk was a solid route runner who finished with over 100 receptions (105) in Mississippi State’s Air Raid attack. He simply needs to prove that he can separate from bump-and-run coverage.
266Charles WileyOLBUTSA5.4484th RoundWiley could buy the team time in a Tyus Bowser-type special teams role while learning how to use his 4.5 speed defensively as a pass rusher. He has a chance to earn a role on the kickoff and punt teams.
285Raleigh WebbAll-Purpose (Gunner-WR)The Citadel5.364th RoundOne of the draft’s best pure athletes, it will all come down to how much Webb impresses at gunner and on the kickoff team during camp. After playing in a run-oriented scheme, he has to learn a lot about the receiver spot. The size and speed are in place.
297Jeremiah MoonOLBFlorida5.314th RoundIt’s not often that 6’5”, 250 pounders get into undrafted free agent status, particularly after broad jumping over 11-feet. That type of explosion is rare, but Moon only flashed at Florida and never developed into a game changer.
379Ricky PersonRBNC State5.15th RoundA consistent, non-flashy runner would be the description for Person. He can protect well enough and catches the ball well out of the backfield. He’ll have competition in camp to even make the practice squad.
411Josh RossLBMichigan5.015th RoundKnock the size, knock the foot speed and whatever else. Macdonald understands that Ross is a natural playmaker with the necessary instincts to compete for a roster spot.
455Anthony BrownQBOregon, Boston College4.845th RoundQuite possibly another undervalued free agent find at QB in the mold of Tyler Huntley, Brown won 25 games in his college career at two different stops.
544Slade BoldenWR/All-purposeAlabama4.536th RoundIt will be tough to earn the slot receiver role for the Ravens in a stacked receiver room. He has been a consistent contributor on special teams at Alabama for a three-year period.
563Aron JohnsonOTSouth Dakota State4.446th RoundJohnson was a key piece in South Dakota State’s 2020-21 spring national championship run and 2021 national semifinal appearance. His experience and technique were high points.
640Emeka EmezieWRNC State4.1017th RoundAt 6-foot-3, Emezie didn’t do much to excite during postseason workouts. NC State’s all-time leading receiver won with technique and length in school. The body control will have to win when covered up.
Rayshad Nichols DLStephen F. AustinN/AN/AThe Louisiana native did more than just start a number of games for the Lumberjacks. The All-LSC selection finished with 10 sacks and 15.5 TFLs in 2021.
Shamar BridgesWRFort Valley StateN/AN/AAt 6-foot-4, with 34” arms, Bridges runs in the 4.5 range. Basketball-type quickness off the line of scrimmage but then drifts coming back to the football (PBU allowed, HBCU Legacy ’22). When working in the slot, displays the ability to change speeds and has another gear. long stride gets up on DBs and put them into panic mode when running box fades at No. 2 slot.
Denzel WilliamsCBVillanova, Sacred HeartN/AN/AWilliams has 4.4 speed that allows him to play a little bigger than his 5’10, 180-pound frame. His quickness and playmaking skill may have been overshadowed by teammate Christian Benford, but he flashed after transferring from Sacred Heart.
Trevon ClarkWRCal N/AN/AIn 12 games, Clark averaged nearly 20 yards per catch in 2021. There have been drops through contact (Nevada), but he had his moments this past season.
David VereenCBNewberryN/AN/AVereen finished his final year on campus with 12 pass breakups. At 5’9, 190, can he make a favorable camp impression at a nickel spot?
Chris Moore S Georgia State, Virginia N/AN/AMoore produced at a relatively sustained level at two different schools, but never produced a breakout season.

Travis Jones DT Baltimore Ravens
Travis Jones surprisingly lasted until the third round, where the Baltimore Ravens selected him with the 76th overall pick.

In the secondary, does Houston’s Demarrion “PePe” Williams attempt to fill the role left by often-injured Tavon Young? The Ravens defensive line may have secured its biggest coup by securing UConn DT Travis Jones. The selection of Jalyn Armour-Davis continues a theme of drafting Alabama cornerbacks with the hope of them finding success within the defensive structure. Can he replace the production vacated by Anthony Averett?