Category Archives: NFL Draft Recap

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: NFC South

NFC South

Carolina Panthers
Former Maryland WR D.J. Moore caught 80 passes for the Terrapins in 2017 and was named the Big Ten’s Receiver of the Year.

Notable picks: The addition of Thomas adds versatility to the middle of the field when the Panthers use multiple tight ends. In addition, Moore’s arrival means that the team actually has another big play option to mix with last year’s second-round pick Curtis Samuel. Jackson brings speed to what was a slow secondary a year ago. This draft seemed to be about adding speed to the roster.

Round,

Selection,

 

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (24) DJ

Moore

6’0 210

Maryland 38 (2nd Round) Moore has the task of providing new OC Norv Turner with a legitimate deep threat. Turner has coached elite route runners in his past (Henry Ellard, Los Angeles Rams, 1985-1990).
2 (55) Donte

Jackson

5’10 178

LSU 93 (3rd Round) Despite a lean build, Jackson will tackle. His confidence in his 4.32 speed benefited him in school, but he won’t be able to sit on as many routes at the next level.
3 (85) Rashaan

Gaulden

S-6’1 197

Tennessee 199 (4th Round) Gaulden didn’t make a lot of plays on the ball, but the energetic former Vol can contribute in a number of ways.   Needs to get stronger.
4 (101) Ian

Thomas

6’4 259

Indiana 143 (3rd Round) Thomas’ breakout performance against Ohio State in the 2017 season opener was perhaps a harbinger of things to come. His run after the catch skill will complement Greg Olsen.
5 (161) Jermaine

Carter

LB-6’1 243

Maryland 327 (5th Round) He had over 100 tackles in back-to-back years and was a sack artist as well (9.5 career sacks). Carter forced eight fumbles in school.
7 (234) Andre Smith LB-6’0 237 North Carolina 237 (4th Round) Smith’s ability to close distances from the inside-out covers up some slight stiffness. If not for injury in 2017, he would have gone much higher in the draft.
7 (242) Kendrick

Norton

DT-6’3 314

Miami (Fla.) Norton is an athletic one-technique DT who can stand to use his 10 ¾-inch hands with more force down-to-down. At 314 pounds, he’s slippery and has a five-yard burst to close air.

 

Atlanta

Falcons

Ridley will have the opportunity to win a number of one-on-one match-ups in the Falcons diverse receiving corps.

Notable picks: Oliver has the length to make up for the release of Jalen Collins from a season ago. Ridley’s speed will win a number of one-on-one matchups in the slot or on the outside. It eases the departure of Taylor Gabriel. Four wide receiver sets could include he and fourth-year man Justin Hardy in the slots. If Ridley and Julio Jones are outside, then Mohamed Sanu and Hardy can man the slot positions.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (26) Calvin

Ridley

6’1 188

Alabama 47 (2nd Round) Ridley is more than capable of winning one-on-one matchups.   Don’t be surprised if he is used in the slot in three wide receiver sets.
2 (58) Isaiah

Oliver

6’0 201

Colorado 20 (2nd Round) Oliver’s length mirrors former Falcons’ cornerback Jalen Collins. He will intensify the team’s nickel packages.
3 (90) Deadrin

Senat

DT-6’0 314

USF 100 (3rd Round) Squats nearly 700 pounds. Barreling block destructor. He dominated his final career game (2017 Birmingham Bowl) and then it carried over to a dominant week of work during 2018 East-West Shrine practices.
4 (126) Ito

Smith

RB-5’9 200

Southern Miss 218 (4th Round) Smith’s production in school should not be underestimated. Aside from posting back-to-back 1,400-yard rushing seasons, he also caught 83 passes the last two seasons.
6 (194) Russell

Gage

WR-6’0 182

LSU 522 (6th Round) Gage’s versatility extends beyond the passing game. He ran for over 230 yards for the Tigers in 2017 and contributed 11 tackles on special teams.
6 (200) Foye

Oluokun

LB-6’0 215

Yale N/A Oluokun overcame a 2015 injury to earn 2nd Team All-Ivy League honors in 2017. He finished his career with an eye-opening 18 pass break-ups and three blocked kicks.

 

 

Tampa

Bay

Buccaneers

Vea (No. 50 pictured) may very well require two blockers and open up the pass rush lanes for newly acquired Jason Pierre-Paul and Pro Bowl DT Gerald McCoy.

Notable pick: Vea adds substance to a defensive interior that allowed nearly 118 yards per game on the ground in 2017. The team also put an emphasis on getting more physical in the secondary with the additions of Davis and Stewart.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (12) Vita Vea

DT-6’4 347

Washington 17 (2nd Round) Vea’s presence in the middle of the defense should create more one-on-one matchups for Pro Bowler Gerald McCoy.
2 (38) Ronald

Jones II

6’0 205

USC 88 (3rd Round) The departure of Doug Martin opens up the possibility that Jones II could get major touches in Year 1.
2 (53) M.J.

Stewart

AP-5’11 200

UNC 57 (2nd Round) Stewart’s positional flexibility extended itself to special teams during his senior campaign (11 yds/PR). He will be a candidate for sub-package duty immediately.
2 (63) Carlton

Davis

CB-6’1 206

Auburn 32 (2nd Round) Davis’ length adds a measure of size to the cornerback spot that was lacking when the team had to defend the Michael Thomas and Julio Jones-types in the division.
3 (94) Alex

Cappa

OL-6’6 305

Humboldt State 224 (4th Round) Cappa is yet another pick who can play multiple spots on game day. The college left tackle’s roughhouse approach may give him a chance to earn repetitions as a guard spot in the NFL.
4 (117) Jordan

Whitehead

S-5’10 195

Pittsburgh 149 (3rd Round) Whitehead plays with the passion necessary to earn playing time on special teams. He was always one of the Panthers top tacklers and he plays extremely fast.
5 (144) Justin

Watson

WR-6’2 215

Penn 319 (5th Round) The Ivy League’s all-time leading receiver was used on the outside, in the slot and even in the backfield during school.
6 (202) Jack

Cichy

LB-6’1 230

Wisconsin Cichy looked like an early round pick when healthy in school. He is a downhill player with a measure of explosiveness as a tackler.

 

 

New

Orleans

Saints

Davenport’s positional flexibility (pictured during 2018 Senior Bowl) could very well operate in a number of positions in DC Dennis Allen’s schemes.

Notable Pick: No pick will be more scrutinized than Davenport. But should it be? The team finished 27th in the NFL in sacks in 2017 (30).

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (14) Trade from Green Bay Marcus

Davenport

DE-6’6 258

UTSA 25 (2nd Round) Davenport has all of the tools to excel in the team’s creative schemes. With Cameron Jordan on the field, he will help to create havoc off the edge with Alex Okafor.
3 (91) Tre’Quan

Smith

WR-6’2 202

UCF 44 (2nd Round) 34 ½-inch arms with an ability to snap out of his hips at the break points. He will be a back-shoulder option to complement Thomas.
4 (127) Rick

Leonard

OL-6’5 307

Florida State 487 (6th Round) Leonard is a good enough run blocker that he may get looks at an interior line position.
5 (164) Natrell

Jamerson

S-5’10 200

Wisconsin 146 (3rd Round) Jamerson continued his upward trek through the postseason with a fine week of work during 2018 East-West Shrine practices.   The former WR has positive ball skills and was one of the better gunners (punt team) in the draft.
6 (189) Kamrin

Moore

CB-5’10 203

Boston College 272 (4th Round) Moore’s versatility (corner or nickel) was a big reason the Eagles finished in the Top 35 in passing defense in each of the last two seasons (2016-17). He is a physical player who likes to challenge opponents.
6 (201) Boston

Scott

RB-5’6 203 (E)

Louisiana Tech N/A Scott supplanted 2016 1,000-yard rusher Jarred Craft from the lineup and paved his own path to getting drafted. He may be short, but he is by no means an easy tackle at 203 pounds.
7 (245) Will

Clapp

OC-6’4 311

LSU 321 (5th Round) Clapp is assignment-sound with positive size.   He frequently won with positioning and guile as a blocker at LSU. Shoulder issues may have caused a slide in the draft.

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: NFC North

NFC North

 

Green Bay Packers
Alexander (No. 10 pictured) may be relied upon to work at the nickel back spot for the Packers.

Notable picks: Alexander and Jackson could eventually develop into the two outside starting cornerbacks. Alexander’s ability to return kicks, play outside or in the slot makes him one of the more versatile players in the 2018 NFL Draft. The potential combination of Alexander, Jackson and Kevin King could be game-changing for the Packers secondary.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (18) Jaire

Alexander CB-5’10 196

Louisville 40 (2nd Round) Teams relied heavily on his outstanding 2016 film. Believes in his recipe. Will he play the nickel with Jackson and King on the outside.
2 (45) Josh

Jackson

CB-6’0 196

Iowa 55 (2nd Round) Jackson is used to this part of the country and the elements won’t be a factor. His ball skills will aid a defense which finished 23rd in pass defense.
3 (88) Trade from Carolina Oren

Burks

LB-6’3 233

Vanderbilt 71 (3rd Round) Burks adds another coverage linebacker to a group that needs more on-field speed. The former safety has all of the tools to develop into at least a nickel contributor in Year 1.
4 (133) J’Mon

Moore

WR-6’3 207

Missouri 160 (3rd Round) Moore was the rare SEC wide receiver to post back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons.
5 (138) Cole

Madison

OL-6’5 307

Washington St. 127 (3rd Round) Former TE with good feet, durability and tackle experience. While he played RT in school, he could battle former UCF star Justin McCray (8 starts in 2017) for playing time at OG.
5 (172) JK

Scott

P-6’6 208

Alabama 411 (5th Round) Four-year starter who punted and kicked off the ‘Tide. Can be dominant kicking in Domes. Catch-and-kick times average between 1.15 and 1.25 seconds. Reminiscent of former Clemson punter Bradley Pinion.
5 (174) Marquez

Valdes-Scantling

WR-6’4 207

USF 281 (4th Round) Valdes-Scantling built on a good junior campaign with a breakout senior campaign.
6 (207) Equanimeous

St. Brown

WR-6’5 214

Notre Dame 80 (3rd Round) St. Brown probably may have more to give than even the team’s fifth-round pick. Regardless of the team’s QB play, he didn’t finish on the ball as well in 2017.
7 (232) James

Looney

DL-6’3 287

California 243 (4th Round) NFL bloodlines are complemented by a steady diet of lateral quickness and strong hands. He is an inconsistent pass rusher and Tyson Alualu-type.   35 ½” VJ.
7 (239) Hunter

Bradley

LS-6’3 241

Mississippi State N/A (long snappers, page 388 of Corey Chavous’ 2018 Draft Guide) Bradley, a long snapper, ran in the 4.7-range and was a big reason for P Logan Cooke’s success.
7 (248) Kendall

Donnerson

DE-6’3 250

SE Missouri State N/A Donnerson turned heads in private workouts prior to the draft with a 40” VJ and 10’11” BJ.

 

 

Chicago Bears
Smith’s ability (No. 3 pictured) to run down plays laterally could increase the speed of an already formidable Bears rush defense.

Notable Pick: Smith could make life painful for opposing running backs as he combines with playmaker Danny Trevathan. He rejoins former Georgia Bulldog teammate Leonard Floyd.   All of the linebackers will have to pay attention to fourth-round pick Joel Iyiebuniwe. He could challenge for playing time.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (8) Roquan

Smith

6’1 236

Georgia 13 (1st Round) Smith’s speed will increase a defensive unit that is going…all the way up.
2 (39) James

Daniels

6’4 295

Iowa 41 (2nd Round) Daniels has he mobility to challenge for a starting offensive guard spot right away. In addition, he is athletic enough to backup at a tackle position.
2 (51) Anthony

Miller

5’11 201

Memphis 43 (2nd Round) Miller’s quickness will open up options on the outside or in the slot. His play speed will make him a major option in the run-pass-option game with Trubisky.
4 (115) Joel

Iyiebuniwe

LB-6’1 229

Western Kentucky 112 (3rd Round) The Bears continue to overhaul their LB corps with a ‘backer who can run and hit.
5 (145) Bilal

Nichols

DT-6’3 306

Delaware 97 (3rd Round) Nichols very easily could have gone higher if not for questions regarding his pad level. He could provide a challenge for DE Jonathan Bullard.
7 (224) Javon

Wims

WR-6’4 215

Georgia,

Belhaven

223 (4th Round) The Bears took a late-round flyer on a player who excelled adjusting to tough passes in 2017. He’s another tall, long wideout in the mold of current Bears Robinson and White. Can he play special teams?

 

 

 

Minnesota Vikings
Carlson connected on 13 field goals of 50 or more yards in school.

Notable pick: Carlson’s ability to hit field goals near the midfield mark will extend the team’s offensive range. Jalen Holmes brings positional versatility to the table and could be a big factor on third downs rushing from an interior line position.   Aruna could become a Day 3 find with his immense level of athleticism.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Mike

Hughes

CB-5’10 183

UCF 16 (2nd Round) Hughes not only offers sub-package immediate potential, he is one of the draft’s best returners.
2 (62) Brian

O’Neill

OT-6’6 298

Pittsburgh 66 (3rd Round) O’Neill has starting potential as a left tackle if he can learn to sit down with more urgency.
4 (102)

 

Jalen

Holmes

DE-6’5 283

Ohio State 156 (3rd Round) Holmes can play up-and-down a defensive front.   He is improving with his hand usage.
5 (167) Daniel

Carlson

PK-6’5 223

Auburn 267 (4th Round) Despite six blocked kicks in school, he kicked 13 field goals of 50 yards or more.
6 (213) Colby

Gossett

OL-6’5 311

Appalachian State 105 (3rd Round) Gossett started 37 games at RG, 8 games at RT and one game at OC in school.
6 (218) Ade

Aruna

OLB-6’5 262

Tulane 219 (3rd Round) Former two-star recruit was much better in 2016 when he stood up as a two-point OLB much of the year.
7 (225) Devante

Downs

LB-6’1 245

California 515 (6th Round) Downs finished his career with 211 tackles and five interceptions despite missing significant time as a senior.   His eye speed makes up for ordinary explosion.

 

Detroit Lions
Johnson’s workhorse mentality was complemented with an ability to throw the halfback pass.

Notable picks: Detroit went into this draft with the desire to get more physical on both sides of the ball. They drafted Johnson to run behind Ragnow and then selected the draft’s best blocking fullback in Bawden. Johnson will make-or-break this crop. If he can provide a one-two punch with some of the current Lions backs, it will finally take pressure off of Matthew Stafford.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (20) Frank

Ragnow

C-6’5 307

Arkansas 121 (3rd Round) Ragnow has always carried starter-traits, but leverage can be an issue for him vs. squatty nose guards.
2 (43) Trade from New England Kerryon

Johnson

RB-5’11 213

Auburn 101 (3rd Round) Johnson’s power and stride length make him look like a 6’2 runner on the field. He contains underrated lower body explosiveness at 213 pounds.   Easy mover.
4 (114) from New England Da’Shawn

Hand

DL-6’4 297

Alabama 137 (3rd Round) Hand is a player with heavy hands and an ability to defend the run. He may never be a great pass rusher, but he fits the profile desired on an underrated defensive front.
 
5 (153) Tyrell

Crosby

OT-6’5 319

Oregon 14 (1st Round) Crosby ranks as one of the best steals of the draft.   He may not look the part, but his 11-inch hands and 35-inch arms will make a difference at the right tackle spot.
7 (237) Nick

Bawden

FB-6’2 240

San Diego State 210 (4th Round) Bawden –a former college quarterback- reads through defenses with an ability to seek and destroy.   A true passion player with huge upside as a blocker. He adds substance to the team’s desire to run effectively in December.

2018 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: NFC East

NFC EAST

 

Dallas Cowboys
Vander Esch hopes to bring championships to the Cowboys over the next few years.

Notable picks: Vander Esch may prove to be the difference-maker that the Cowboys envision with his versatility. Armstrong’s uneven pre-draft workouts are not at all an indication of his on-field burst and athleticism. Williams adds some swing backup insurance and could outplay his original draft position.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (19) Leighton

Vander Esch

6’4 256

Boise State 36 (2nd Round) Athletic former basketball player has to become better in his stack-and-shed. Underrated range in coverage.
2 (50) Connor

Williams

6’5 296

Texas 3 (1st Round) Williams’ injury in 2017 following an inauspicious start to his junior campaign. When he’s on top of his game, the finish is in place.
3 (81) Michael

Gallup

WR-6’1 205

Colorado St. 145 (3rd Round) Gallup wins outside the numbers and plays with a physical style that is even stronger than his sturdy 205-pound nature suggests play-to-play.
3 (82) Tracy

Walker

DB-6’1 195

Louisiana-Lafayette 191 (4th Round) Walker has enough length that he could even get looks at a cornerback spot. A solid tackler, his best football may be ahead of him.
4 (116) Dorance

Armstrong, Jr.

OLB-6’4 257

Kansas 49 (2nd Round) Armstrong, Jr. has an 84-inch wingspan and produced 20 tackles for loss in 2016.
4 (140) Dalton Schultz

TE-6’4 249

Stanford 296 (4th Round) Schultz is an underrated route runner despite producing just 11 third down receptions in school.
5 (171) Mike

White

QB-6’4 223

Western Kentucky 155 (3rd Round) White has all of the tools of an NFL starting quarterback minus the mobility.
6 (208) Cedrick

Wilson

WR-6’3 194

Boise State 78 (3rd Round) Wilson produced like a first-round wideout in the MWC. Will his 4.55 speed translate to the perimeter or will he be relegated to the slot?
7 (236) Bo

Scarbrough

RB-6’1 228

Alabama 308 (5th Round) It may have been a long wait on draft day, but the bruising runner could be a change-of-pace power back if he can contribute on special teams.

 

 

 

New

York

Giants

Hill (No. 98 pictured) ranked as one of DraftNasty’s Top 3-4 DEs/DTs available in the 2018 NFL Draft. The former Wolfpack star rushed for over 800 yards and 5 TDs as a senior at the prep level.

Notable picks: Hernandez is a mammoth blocker who wins on man blocks.   If he can win as an angle blocker, it will increase the diversity of the running game.  Hill and McIntosh both will add diversity to a defense that finished 27th against the run in 2017.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (2) Saquon

Barkley

RB-6’0 233

Penn State 2 (1st Round) Barkley’s lateral agility is top-notch. How much will he contribute as a check down threat?   Based on his collegiate film, he should line up at a number of spots.
2 (34) Will

Hernandez

OG-6’2 327

UTEP 21 (2nd Round) A behemoth bar room brawler with mass and underrated quickness, Hernandez has to distribute his weight evenly to reach his immense potential.
3 (66) Lorenzo

Carter

OLB-6’5 250

Georgia 68 (3rd Round) Carter has some similarities to current Carolina Panthers DE Mario Addison. Can he create speed-to-power off the edge?
3 (69) B.J. Hill

DL-6’3 311

NC State 22 (2nd Round) Hill’s dependability is aided by an ability to play a bit longer than his 77-inch wingspan would suggest. Makes plays laterally in the run game.
4 (108) Kyle

Lauletta

QB-6’3 222

Richmond 154 (3rd Round) Lauletta –the 2017 CAA Offensive Player of the Year- maintains good posture in the pocket and excels on the hit-and-throw concepts. Posted a 4.07 time in the 20-yard short shuttle at the NFL Combine.
5 (139) RJ

McIntosh

DT-6’4 286

Miami (Fla.) 161 (3rd Round) McIntosh has the size to play either DE or DT.   His 83-inch wingspan complements a light-footed nature. He needs to anticipate snap counts with more consistency.

 

 

Philadelphia Eagles
Former Pittsburgh cornerback Avonte Maddox (No. 14 pictured) played WR, CB, PR KR and the nickel back spot for the Panthers. He will add versatility to the Super Bowl champions’ roster.

Notable pick: Maddox is a player who went undervalued due to size and slight durability concerns. His ability to cover the slot could increase some of the packages by DC Jim Schwartz. Schwartz typically likes to rush with four players and Maddox could increase coverage disguises.  The Eagles got three of our top 60 players with their first three selections.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (49) Dallas

Goedert

6’4 260

South Dakota St. 56 (2nd Round) Goedert gives the Eagles two tight ends who can attack vertically in the seams of the field. And he weighs in the 260-pound range.
4 (125) Avonte

Maddox

CB-5’9 183

Pittsburgh 53 (2nd Round) Maddox’s 4.39 40-yard dash at the Combine was only outdone by his 6.51 time in the 3-cone drill. He’s even better on the field than in T-shirts and shorts.
4 (130) Josh

Sweat

DE-6’5 251

Florida St. 58 (2nd Round) Sweat fell due to lingering question marks about his knee.   When he’s feeling good, he can translate speed-to-power with one-hand posts and collapses the edge vs. tackles.
6 (206) Matthew

Pryor

OT-6’6 343

TCU 375 (5th Round) Pryor sits on run defenders with his mammoth size.   He often wins in the first phase of block. 11 ½-inch hands.
7 (233) Acquired from New England Patriots Jordan

Mailata

OL-6’8 346

Australia Rugby player N/A Mailata never played college football, but he ran in the 5.1-range for NFL scouts.

 

Washington Redskins
Settle (No. 4 pictured) posted 19.5 tackles for losses the last two seasons for the Hokies.

Notable picks: Christian will help alleviate the issues the Redskins had last year when injuries beset the offensive line. Can he swing to the center position to challenge incumbent Chase Roullier?  Settle is a player who was once thought of as a potential second-round pick before an uneven postseason.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (13) De’Ron

Payne

DT-6’2 311

Alabama 30 (2nd Round) Payne will help to control the action as a fire-plugging two-gap specialist and occasional one-gap penetrator. Expect to see him aligned over the center in DC Greg Manusky’s three-man fronts.
2 (59) Derrius

Guice

RB-5’11 224

LSU 24 (2nd Round) Guice will have to balance his bullish running style to avoid the injury scrapes that took away time from him as a junior.
3 (74) Geron

Christian

OT-6’5 298

Louisville 79 (3rd Round) Christian’s versatility in school saw him move around during games. He was seen snapping the ball on his Pro Day and it could be a possible transition to a starting role.
4 (109) Troy

Apke

S-6’1 200

Penn State 147 (3rd Round) Apke didn’t make a number of plays off the hash, but he demonstrated range during the week of the 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and versus Pittsburgh in 2017.
5 (163) Tim

Settle

DT-6’3 329

Virginia Tech 200 (4th Round) Settle’s quickness is aided by power. He will win versus guards or centers and could be a rotational piece on first and second down.
6 (197) Shaun

Dion Hamilton

LB-6’0 228

Alabama 231 (4th Round) Crimson Tide team captain has battled major lower extremity injuries, but he can locate, identify and close once he’s made his reads.
7 (241) Greg

Stroman

CB-5’11 174

Virginia Tech 381 (5th Round) With Stroman’s level of return ability, it is easy to forget that he also broke up 27 passes and picked off 9 passes in school.
7 (256) Trey Quinn

WR-5’11 203

SMU, LSU 227 (4th Round) Mr. Irrelevant caught 114 passes in 2017 after an unsettling stint at LSU. His savvy and quickness earn high marks.

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: AFC North

Baltimore Ravens
Hayden Hurst (No. 81 pictured) runs over tacklers in a game between the South Carolina Gamecocks and Vanderbilt Commodores at Dudley Field in Nashville, TN Photo by Thomas McEwen/Draft Nasty

Notable pick: Brown could make this a home run in the draft. If his pre-draft workouts were any indication, a simple uptick in work ethic may be in order to match his impressive on-field play. Hurst and Andrews extend the middle of the field from Day 1, as does former New Mexico State high-riser Scott.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (25) Hayden

Hurst

TE-6’5 250

South Carolina 39 (2nd Round Smooth. He even spent a game tracking punts in 2016 (Georgia).   Underrated run after the catch skill.
1 (32) Trade from Philadelphia Lamar

Jackson

QB-6’2 216

Louisville 10 (1st Round) Underrated as a passer, Jackson will make tacklers miss in the NFL…too.
3 (83) Orlando

Brown

OT-6’8 345

Oklahoma 158 (3rd Round) Brown’s barrel-chested approach extended itself into the fourth quarters of games.
3 (86) Mark

Andrews

TE-6’5 256

Oklahoma 92 (3rd Round) Andrews has the ability to run routes from a flexed position and is strong enough to make contested catches.
4 (118) Anthony

Averett

CB-5’11 183

Alabama 206 (4th Round) Averett’s uncle Bryant McKinnie once played for the Ravens.
4 (122) Kenny

Young

LB-6’1 236

UCLA 187 (4th Roiund) Young’s coverage ability is reminiscent to former UCLA LB Jayon Brown (Titans).
4 (132) Jaleel

Scott

WR-6’5 218

New Mexico St. 208 (4th Round) Scott’s one-hand grab vs. Arizona State in 2017 was just one of many spectacular on-ball adjustments he made as a senior. Catch radius (34-inch arms) helps his cause.
5 (162) Jordan

Lasley

WR-6’1 203

UCLA 259 (4th Round) Lasley is a smooth receiver who balanced concentration lapses with an ability to roll speed cuts.
6 (190) DeShon

Elliott

S-6’1 210

Texas 115 (3rd Round) Elliott has some stiffness, but he reacts well breaking downhill on the ball. His eyes have been undisciplined. He has potential as a special teams cover guy.
6 (212) Greg

Senat

OT-6’5 302

Wagner 434 (5th Round) Senat brings an 84-inch wingspan and a look reminiscent to former Boise State Bronco Charles Leno coming out of school.   Leverage issues need to be corrected.
6 (215) Bradley

Bozeman

OC-6’5 317

Alabama  482 (6th Round) More of a position than drive blocker, Bozeman uses his size to win as a run blocker. A lack of foot speed is evident.
7 (238) Zach

Sieler

DE-6’6 288

Ferris State N/A Wins during the second phase of downs. His combination of size and strength could help him land a roster spot.

 

Cincinnati Bengals
Former Texas LB Malik Jefferson (No. 46 pictured) will look to break into a crowded Bengals linebacking corps.
Photo by: Corey Chavous, DraftNasty Magazine

Notable picks: Price has to be able to create more forward movement for what has been a stagnant rushing attack. In addition, his line calls will be important for a unit that struggled giving up sacks. Bates III and Jefferson will have a tough time earning playing time with a number of veterans currently on the roster. The Bengals added quality depth at a number of spots on the defensive side of the ball. Harris may be the surprise of the group.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (21) Billy

Price

OC-6’4 306

Ohio State 37 (2nd Round) Price’s addition will help a unit that averaged just 3.6 yards per rushing attempt in 2017.
2 (54) Jessie

Bates III

S-6’1 200

Wake Forest 18 (2nd Round) Bates III’s eye speed is elite and his ball skills are above average. His range could enhance the Bengals’ coverage packages.
3 (77) Sam

Hubbard

DE-6’5 270

Ohio State 50 (2nd Round) Hubbard has impressive change of direction (6.88 3-cone) at 270 pounds. Needs to work on developing more speed-to-power as a pass rusher.
3 (78) Malik

Jefferson

LB-6’2 236

Texas 88 (3rd Round) Jefferson- an underrated blitzer- improved his key-and-diagnose in DC Todd Orlando’s schemes.
4 (112) Mark

Walton

RB-5’10 202

Miami (Fla.) 148 (3rd Round) Walton’s ability to break tackles is aided by an ability to run routes out of the backfield.
5 (151) Davontae

Harris

CB-5’11 205

Illinois State 98 (3rd Round) This is a player who impressed at every stop of the postseason process. He will challenge for playing time either outside or inside due to his physicality.
5 (158) Andrew

Brown

DT-6’3 294

Virginia 125 (3rd Round) Brown never quite lived up to his pre-collegiate hype, but he still produced 26.5 tackles for loss in his career.
5 (170) Darius

Phillips

AP-5’10 188

Western Michigan 190 (4th Round) Phillips, an all-purpose maestro, scored 14 touchdowns five different ways in school. He needs work on his coverage techniques at corner.
7 (249) Logan

Woodside

QB-6’1 213

Toledo 402 (5th Round) Woodside’s proclivity for the big stage shined when facing teams like Miami (Fla.) in 2017. His efficiency, athleticism and moxie make for a good combination.
7 (252) Rod

Taylor

OG-6’3 320

Ole Miss 111 (3rd Round) Taylor has started at LT, RT and RG in school.   He projects inside but could be a backup at a number of spots.
7 (253) Auden

Tate

WR-6’5 228

FSU  239 (4th Round) Tate led the ACC in touchdown receptions as a senior (10), but there are questions surrounding his ability to create separation in short areas.
 

 

 

Cleveland Browns Notable pick: The Browns may have found their new lockdown cornerback in Ward (No. 12 pictured). Could he be an even better version of former Browns Pro Bowler Joe Haden? The team has now created quality depth at the cornerback spot with Ward, Howard Wilson, Boddy-Calhoun, Taylor and recent signee Travis Carrie.
Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1) Baker

Mayfield

QB-6’0 216

Oklahoma 54 (2nd Round) Mayfield’s mentality may be the juice that the Browns need as an organization. He will need to prove he can handle the elements.
1 (4) Denzel

Ward

CB-5’11 183

Ohio State 9 (1st Round) Ward brings immediate nickel potential from Day 1 with his level of footwork and quickness. He will need to improve playing with his back to the quarterback. Rare physical skill-set.
2 (33) Austin

Corbett

OL-6’4 310

Nevada 42 (2nd Round) Corbett- a college LT- can provide assistance at any of four offensive line spots. He is one of this draft’s smartest prospects.
2 (35) Nick

Chubb

RB-6’0 227

Georgia 26 (2nd Round) One of the SEC’s all-time best runners, Chubb will be a workhorse if he can remain healthy.
3 (67) Chad

Thomas

DE-6’5 281

Miami (Fla.) 142 (3rd Round) Thomas may eventually morph into a four-technique DE, but he already can be a factor inside on third downs for Gregg Williams’ multiple fronts.
4 (105) Antonio

Calllaway

WR-5’10 200

Florida 163 (3rd Round) Callaway has to become more consistent in his decision-making both on and off the field. Just as quick as he is fast.
5 (150) Genard

Avery

LB-6’0 248

Memphis 59 (2nd Round) Powerball player who runs over opponents.   Impressed scouts with his 4.5 speed in the postseason.
6 (175) Damion

Ratley

WR-6’3 200

Texas A&M 405 (5th Round) Ratley has 4.4 speed and is shifty after the catch. He will need to eliminate the concentration drops and speed up his release vs. bump-and-run.
6 (188) Simeon

Thomas

CB-6’3 203

Louisiana-Lafayette 625 (7th Round) Off-and-on starter whose size allows him to recover down the field. His cousin, Marvin Bracy, was a two-time All-USA selection in track & field

 

Pittsburgh Steelers Notable pick: Edmunds (No. 22 pictured) will challenge for playing time immediately and put pressure on whoever is in front of him at safety. He could very well play the role of former Steeler and current free agent Mike Mitchell.
Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (28) Terrell

Edmunds

S-6’2 220

Virginia Tech 133 (3rd Round) Edmunds has covered the slot, played in the box, and also contributed on special teams. Impressed the Hokies’ coaching staff with his toughness playing through a shoulder injury in 2017.
2 (60) James

Washington

WR-5’11 213

Oklahoma St. 48 (2nd Round) Plays faster than he times in T-shirts and shorts. Has the length of an offensive tackle. Tracks the ball.
3 (76) Mason

Rudolph

QB-6’5 234

Oklahoma State 102 (3rd Round) Rudolph goes into a situation where he can develop behind a quarterback who is similar in size.
3 (92) Chukwuma

Okorafor

OT-6’6 320

Western Michigan 138 (3rd Round) Okorafor actually played LT when Willie Beavers was in school but he will likely project to the right side for the Steelers. He may be a better run than pass blocker.
5 (148) Marcus

Allen

S-6’2 215

Penn State 119 (3rd Round) One of college football’s best tacklers, Allen has to improve his ability to steal second base off the hash.
5 (165) Jaylen

Samuels

AP-5’11 225

NC State 95 (3rd Round) Samuels never seems to be going at a speed where he allows himself to get out of control. While it works offensively, he will need to play with more of a sense of urgency to contribute consistently on special teams.
7 (246) Joshua

Frazier

DT-6’3 321

Alabama 494 (6th Round) Frazier exhibited a powerful long-arm to post back guards and centers. He is active but too often gets tied up losing to the spot.