Tag Archives: 2018 NFL Draft WRs

DraftNasty spotlights Chicago Bears 2nd Round pick Anthony Miller: It’s Miller Time

Former Memphis wide receiver Anthony Miller was ranked 43rd overall on DraftNasty’s 2018 Big Board.  The Chicago Bears took him with the 51st overall pick (2nd Round) of the 2018 NFL Draft.  The second-team All-American went over the 1,400-yard mark in 2017 (1,462) after topping the 1,200-yard mark as a junior.  His ability to play in the slot or on the outside made him one of the draft’s most attractive targets.

Washington Redskins, 7th Round, 256th overall selection, Mr. Irrelevant: Trey Quinn WR SMU

18 Trey Quinn 5’11 203 WR-SMU, LSU

What makes this player Nasty….(Strengths): Positive size and measurements. Former high school track star with above average long speed if he can build to it (Tulane ’17). Frequently controls the slot positions for the Mustangs. He’s the team’s move guy with z-in and z-out motion, much like he was during his freshman year at LSU. They’ve even aligned him in an offset RB spot to run trail-seams (SMU ’17). Uses his helmet to move defenders on his straight-stem. Excels running post-corner-post routes from the No. 2 slot position and will beat double teams (UConn ’17-2 TDs, Tulane ’17-TD). As an outside WR (LSU), he would attack the CB’s blind spots and then drop his weight on comebacks (Tabor, Florida ’14). This showed up on occasion at SMU on post-corners from the outside Z-WR position (Tulane ’17). Satisfactory hand-eye coordination. Snatches the ball. He will go low to scoop errant passes off the turf (Florida ’14). Displays little regard for his body attacking the middle of the field (one-hand grab (left) on dig route, Houston ’17). Exhibits body control along the sidelines when running double moves (TCU ’17). The team often put him at the No. 2 weak position in empty to work pivot-returns, quick outs, shallow crossers, digs and post-corners. Works the seams of the field. Deft option route runner (3rd and 3-6). He’s even been used on double passes (TCU ’17). He’s come through for the team in clutch situations with miraculous efforts (4th and 4, 4th QTR, Cincinnati ’17).

Weaknesses: One-year wonder. Got buried on the depth chart at LSU behind ordinary receivers. Why did he leave? Average run after the catch threat with limited wiggle. Will leave passes on the turf. Dropped a shallow crossing route vs. Florida in 2014 with no one around. He also had a drop vs. UConn in 2017. Does not run through the ball on quick drives or slant routes. He was not featured much outside at either LSU or SMU despite having adequate size and speed. May project as a slot-only prospect. While at LSU, he would struggle vs. physical play near the LOS (Florida ’14). CBs can still frustrate him when split outside in press coverage (Lewis, Tulane ’17). Will drift up the field at times on some of his speed cuts on out-breaking routes. Will fall away from punts on occasion when attempting to judge the flight of the ball (Houston ’17).

Other Notes:

  • Attended Barbe HS (La.) and became the national all-time leader in receiving yards (6,566). Set a Louisiana state record for receptions (357)
  • Was named a USA Today 1st Team All-American
  • Two-time Class 5A state finalist in the 100-meters (10.93)
  • Threw a no-hitter in the opening round of the 2008 Little League World Series
  • 2014 (7 sts, LSU): 17 catches for 193 yards (11.3 YPR); One tackle
  • 2015 (2 sts. LSU): 5 receptions for 83 yards
  • 17 receptions for 156 yards and one TD vs. Houston on 10/7/17
  • 17 catches for 186 yards vs. Cincinnati on 10/21/17
  • 2017 (13 sts, 1st Team All-AAC): 114 catches for 1,236 yards (10.8 YPR) and 13 TDs; 1-of-2 passes for 34 yards and one INT; Two tackles
  • 2018 NFL Combine: 9 ¼” hands, 32” arms, 17 reps-225 lbs, 4.55 40-yd, 33 ½” VJ, 9’8” BJ, 6.91 3-cone, 4.19 20-yd SS, 11.4 60-yd LS

Time to get Nasty….Our Summary: Current Arkansas offensive coordinator and former SMU OC Joe Craddock clearly had a plan for Quinn in 2017. Perhaps he watched his LSU film. While there, Quinn ran a number of possession routes off of stack looks or in motion. Many of them were on third downs as a freshman. The decision to leave LSU is still an unknown, but he took full advantage of playing in SMU’s creative scheme this past year. He’s strong, quick and tough. Additionally, he has positive hand-eye coordination. To become a solid slot option in the NFL, he has to create more of an illusion for the defensive back. Despite good timed speed, he sometimes looks as if he’s playing at one clip on Saturdays. While he stems well to move defensive backs off their marks, he is not as decisive the more physical man coverage enters the equation. The former Mustang brings Day 3 value to the 2018 NFL Draft.

DraftNasty’s Grade: 5.5 (4th Round)

2018 Big Board Rank: 227

 

DraftNasty’s Under the Radar, Vol. II: Kalib Woods 6’1 188 WR FAU

Strengths: Four-year contributor. Long, silky-smooth receiver. Plays a little stronger than his size would suggest. As a freshman, he showed enough COD vs. rolled-up coverage. Back then, he was used on possession hitches on the perimeter (Middle Tennessee ’14). As a backside X-WR, he’s made some spectacular high-point TD grabs (Middle Tenn ’14). Body control. Flips his hips well to cross the face of CBs on inside routes (Tulsa ’15). Contorts his body to catch in-breaking routes behind him. Consistently adjusts to ball off-target. He can sink to catch passes low to the turf. Allows his body to die along the sidelines and toe-taps to get his feet in-bounds (Tulsa ’15). Long strider. Covers six-to-six and a half yards on his first four steps. Able to contort his body to maneuver vs. aggressive CBs to draw contact. Uses arms to get a nudge of room on long patterns down the field.

Weaknesses: Off the field concerns. Suspended for the first six games of the 2017 season due to an incident that occurred in early June (http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/fau-owls/fl-sp-fau-owls-news-mon-20170904-story.html).   One of his biggest weaknesses has always come around not truly sinking his hips. Has a tendency to run to the spot and fail to accelerate upon arrival (allows CBs to beat him to the reception point). Raises his frame when chopping into his square-in/dig patterns (Tulsa ’15, Marshall ’17). Does a little too much chopping-and-shaking vs. press on some of his outside releases. Questionable strength holding stalk blocks on the perimeter.

Other Notes:

  • Attended Duncan Fletcher HS (Fla.) and was a three-sport athlete in football, basketball and track & field
  • 2014: 16 receptions for 223 yards (13.9 YPR) and 2 TDs
  • 2015: 27 receptions for 330 yards (12.2 YPR) and 3 TDs
  • Six 100-yard receiving games
  • 2016: 68 receptions for 934 yards
  • 6 receptions for 208 yards and one TD vs. North Texas on 12/2/17
  • 2017 (8 gms): 24 catches for 619 yards (25.8 YPR) and 4 TDs
  • Career Stats: 135 catches for 2,106 yards (15.6 YPR) and 10 TDs
  • 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl measurements: 6023 188 9” hands, 32 3/4” arms, 79 1/4” wingspan
  • 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl In-game report: Kept working vs. stacked double team on the perimeter as a gunner and got in on tackle in the 3rd QTR (4:04). Caught a comeback outside the numbers from Woodside for dying ball.

Summary:  His former offensive coordinator Brian Wright said way back in 2014, “He has the ability to be a great player.” That statement may very well have been true but, much to Woods’ own doing, that statement never truly came to fruition. Where he goes is not as important as to what role he could play for an NFL team. We think he’s capable of contributing on special teams because he showed some upside in kick coverage during the 2017 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl.  However, there are issues about his foot speed. Will he run in the 4.6-range?  Woods has some similarities to former Louisiana Tech wide receiver Quinton Patton (49ers, Jets).

DraftNasty’s Grade: 5.361 (4th Round)

Editor’s Note: DraftNasty’s grades on players are compiled from our eight identifying characteristics and do not constitute a draft projection.

DraftNasty’s Under the Radar, Vol. I: Thomas Owens 6’1 198 (E) WR FIU

Strengths: Body control. Long strider who builds to speed. Adjusts over the wrong shoulder to make tough catches (UCF ’16). He finds a way to win on jump balls through positioning and upper body strength (Tulane ’17-Nickerson; Minter-MTSU ’17). The team moves him both inside and outside in their schemes. No false steps off the ball in his two-point stance if uncovered. Accelerates into slant routes with a controlled straight-stem.  Exhibits nice patience on deep stops outside the numbers. Makes the low-ball scoop snags near the ground. Extends his inside arm to overpower CBs in press coverage (P.I. vs. Jackson, Marshall ’17).  Has won on slant-and-go routes in the RZ (TD, Marshall ’17).

Weaknesses: Does not impress going in to crack block on safeties (Marshall ’17). Allowed a skinny post to slip through his hands vs. Old Dominion in 2014. Covers just five yards in his first four steps. Displays limited energy setting up post-corners as an X-WR. Questionable long gear on nine routes. Sinking at the top of his routes has been an issue dating back to 2014.  Fails to consistently come back downhill for the ball (UCF ’16-PBU, Killings). Knee injury cut short his 2017 campaign.He’s made questionable decisions blocking back towards his GL (clip, UCF ’16). Will run the stutter-and-go outside the numbers (as an X-WR) but does not re-accelerate into the second portion of the pattern.

Other Notes:

  • Attended Atlantic Community HS (Fla.) and played football/basketball
  • Averaged 12.6 PPG in basketball at the prep level
  • 9 receptions for 166 yards vs. Indiana on 9/12/15
  • 2015 (12 sts): 51 catches for 638 yards (12.5 YPR) and 8 TDs
  • 11 catches for 148 yards and 2 TDs vs. Charlotte on 10/15/16
  • 2016 (12 sts, Honorable mention All-C-USA): 47 catches for 652 yards (13.9 YPR) and 7 TDs
  • 11 catches for 162 yards and one TD vs. MTSU on 10/7/17
  • 2017 (9 gms, 1st Team All-C-USA): 59 catches for 887 yards (15 YPR) and 6 TDs
  • Career Stats: 40 games, 157 receptions for 2,177 yards (13.9 YPR) and 21 TDs; One TD pass; 11.4 yds/PR

 

Summary: Owens did not receive a combine invite and he will have to make up for it on his Pro Day. His speed is a question mark entering the postseason. We were impressed with the physicality he showed as a runner after the catch. Look no further than the Middle Tennessee State game as a senior to observe how relentlessly he attacks the football down the field. His tenacity as a blocker was up-and-down for the most part in the film viewed, but it is an area that has improved over the course of his career. The Panthers ranked No. 1 at the FBS level in Red Zone efficiency in 2017. A big part of the reason was Owens’ ability to draw coverage in their balanced attack. He finished his career with 21 touchdown grabs. He has late-round value if he can clear the medical checks on his knee by NFL teams.

DraftNasty’s Grade: 5.082 (5th Round)

Editor’s Note: DraftNasty’s grades on players are compiled from our eight identifying characteristics and do not constitute a draft projection.