Tag Archives: Cincinnati Bengals

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: AFC North

Baltimore Ravens
Hayden Hurst (No. 81 pictured) runs over tacklers in a game between the South Carolina Gamecocks and Vanderbilt Commodores at Dudley Field in Nashville, TN Photo by Thomas McEwen/Draft Nasty

Notable pick: Brown could make this a home run in the draft. If his pre-draft workouts were any indication, a simple uptick in work ethic may be in order to match his impressive on-field play. Hurst and Andrews extend the middle of the field from Day 1, as does former New Mexico State high-riser Scott.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (25) Hayden

Hurst

TE-6’5 250

South Carolina 39 (2nd Round Smooth. He even spent a game tracking punts in 2016 (Georgia).   Underrated run after the catch skill.
1 (32) Trade from Philadelphia Lamar

Jackson

QB-6’2 216

Louisville 10 (1st Round) Underrated as a passer, Jackson will make tacklers miss in the NFL…too.
3 (83) Orlando

Brown

OT-6’8 345

Oklahoma 158 (3rd Round) Brown’s barrel-chested approach extended itself into the fourth quarters of games.
3 (86) Mark

Andrews

TE-6’5 256

Oklahoma 92 (3rd Round) Andrews has the ability to run routes from a flexed position and is strong enough to make contested catches.
4 (118) Anthony

Averett

CB-5'11 183

Alabama 206 (4th Round) Averett’s uncle Bryant McKinnie once played for the Ravens.
4 (122) Kenny

Young

LB-6’1 236

UCLA 187 (4th Roiund) Young’s coverage ability is reminiscent to former UCLA LB Jayon Brown (Titans).
4 (132) Jaleel

Scott

WR-6’5 218

New Mexico St. 208 (4th Round) Scott’s one-hand grab vs. Arizona State in 2017 was just one of many spectacular on-ball adjustments he made as a senior. Catch radius (34-inch arms) helps his cause.
5 (162) Jordan

Lasley

WR-6’1 203

UCLA 259 (4th Round) Lasley is a smooth receiver who balanced concentration lapses with an ability to roll speed cuts.
6 (190) DeShon

Elliott

S-6’1 210

Texas 115 (3rd Round) Elliott has some stiffness, but he reacts well breaking downhill on the ball. His eyes have been undisciplined. He has potential as a special teams cover guy.
6 (212) Greg

Senat

OT-6’5 302

Wagner 434 (5th Round) Senat brings an 84-inch wingspan and a look reminiscent to former Boise State Bronco Charles Leno coming out of school.   Leverage issues need to be corrected.
6 (215) Bradley

Bozeman

OC-6’5 317

Alabama  482 (6th Round) More of a position than drive blocker, Bozeman uses his size to win as a run blocker. A lack of foot speed is evident.
7 (238) Zach

Sieler

DE-6’6 288

Ferris State N/A Wins during the second phase of downs. His combination of size and strength could help him land a roster spot.

 

Cincinnati Bengals
Former Texas LB Malik Jefferson (No. 46 pictured) will look to break into a crowded Bengals linebacking corps.
Photo by: Corey Chavous, DraftNasty Magazine

Notable picks: Price has to be able to create more forward movement for what has been a stagnant rushing attack. In addition, his line calls will be important for a unit that struggled giving up sacks. Bates III and Jefferson will have a tough time earning playing time with a number of veterans currently on the roster. The Bengals added quality depth at a number of spots on the defensive side of the ball. Harris may be the surprise of the group.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (21) Billy

Price

OC-6’4 306

Ohio State 37 (2nd Round) Price’s addition will help a unit that averaged just 3.6 yards per rushing attempt in 2017.
2 (54) Jessie

Bates III

S-6’1 200

Wake Forest 18 (2nd Round) Bates III’s eye speed is elite and his ball skills are above average. His range could enhance the Bengals’ coverage packages.
3 (77) Sam

Hubbard

DE-6’5 270

Ohio State 50 (2nd Round) Hubbard has impressive change of direction (6.88 3-cone) at 270 pounds. Needs to work on developing more speed-to-power as a pass rusher.
3 (78) Malik

Jefferson

LB-6’2 236

Texas 88 (3rd Round) Jefferson- an underrated blitzer- improved his key-and-diagnose in DC Todd Orlando’s schemes.
4 (112) Mark

Walton

RB-5’10 202

Miami (Fla.) 148 (3rd Round) Walton’s ability to break tackles is aided by an ability to run routes out of the backfield.
5 (151) Davontae

Harris

CB-5’11 205

Illinois State 98 (3rd Round) This is a player who impressed at every stop of the postseason process. He will challenge for playing time either outside or inside due to his physicality.
5 (158) Andrew

Brown

DT-6’3 294

Virginia 125 (3rd Round) Brown never quite lived up to his pre-collegiate hype, but he still produced 26.5 tackles for loss in his career.
5 (170) Darius

Phillips

AP-5’10 188

Western Michigan 190 (4th Round) Phillips, an all-purpose maestro, scored 14 touchdowns five different ways in school. He needs work on his coverage techniques at corner.
7 (249) Logan

Woodside

QB-6’1 213

Toledo 402 (5th Round) Woodside’s proclivity for the big stage shined when facing teams like Miami (Fla.) in 2017. His efficiency, athleticism and moxie make for a good combination.
7 (252) Rod

Taylor

OG-6’3 320

Ole Miss 111 (3rd Round) Taylor has started at LT, RT and RG in school.   He projects inside but could be a backup at a number of spots.
7 (253) Auden

Tate

WR-6’5 228

FSU  239 (4th Round) Tate led the ACC in touchdown receptions as a senior (10), but there are questions surrounding his ability to create separation in short areas.
 

 

 

Cleveland Browns Notable pick: The Browns may have found their new lockdown cornerback in Ward (No. 12 pictured). Could he be an even better version of former Browns Pro Bowler Joe Haden? The team has now created quality depth at the cornerback spot with Ward, Howard Wilson, Boddy-Calhoun, Taylor and recent signee Travis Carrie.
Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1) Baker

Mayfield

QB-6’0 216

Oklahoma 54 (2nd Round) Mayfield’s mentality may be the juice that the Browns need as an organization. He will need to prove he can handle the elements.
1 (4) Denzel

Ward

CB-5’11 183

Ohio State 9 (1st Round) Ward brings immediate nickel potential from Day 1 with his level of footwork and quickness. He will need to improve playing with his back to the quarterback. Rare physical skill-set.
2 (33) Austin

Corbett

OL-6’4 310

Nevada 42 (2nd Round) Corbett- a college LT- can provide assistance at any of four offensive line spots. He is one of this draft’s smartest prospects.
2 (35) Nick

Chubb

RB-6’0 227

Georgia 26 (2nd Round) One of the SEC’s all-time best runners, Chubb will be a workhorse if he can remain healthy.
3 (67) Chad

Thomas

DE-6’5 281

Miami (Fla.) 142 (3rd Round) Thomas may eventually morph into a four-technique DE, but he already can be a factor inside on third downs for Gregg Williams’ multiple fronts.
4 (105) Antonio

Calllaway

WR-5’10 200

Florida 163 (3rd Round) Callaway has to become more consistent in his decision-making both on and off the field. Just as quick as he is fast.
5 (150) Genard

Avery

LB-6’0 248

Memphis 59 (2nd Round) Powerball player who runs over opponents.   Impressed scouts with his 4.5 speed in the postseason.
6 (175) Damion

Ratley

WR-6’3 200

Texas A&M 405 (5th Round) Ratley has 4.4 speed and is shifty after the catch. He will need to eliminate the concentration drops and speed up his release vs. bump-and-run.
6 (188) Simeon

Thomas

CB-6’3 203

Louisiana-Lafayette 625 (7th Round) Off-and-on starter whose size allows him to recover down the field. His cousin, Marvin Bracy, was a two-time All-USA selection in track & field

 

Pittsburgh Steelers Notable pick: Edmunds (No. 22 pictured) will challenge for playing time immediately and put pressure on whoever is in front of him at safety. He could very well play the role of former Steeler and current free agent Mike Mitchell.
Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (28) Terrell

Edmunds

S-6’2 220

Virginia Tech 133 (3rd Round) Edmunds has covered the slot, played in the box, and also contributed on special teams. Impressed the Hokies’ coaching staff with his toughness playing through a shoulder injury in 2017.
2 (60) James

Washington

WR-5’11 213

Oklahoma St. 48 (2nd Round) Plays faster than he times in T-shirts and shorts. Has the length of an offensive tackle. Tracks the ball.
3 (76) Mason

Rudolph

QB-6’5 234

Oklahoma State 102 (3rd Round) Rudolph goes into a situation where he can develop behind a quarterback who is similar in size.
3 (92) Chukwuma

Okorafor

OT-6’6 320

Western Michigan 138 (3rd Round) Okorafor actually played LT when Willie Beavers was in school but he will likely project to the right side for the Steelers. He may be a better run than pass blocker.
5 (148) Marcus

Allen

S-6’2 215

Penn State 119 (3rd Round) One of college football’s best tacklers, Allen has to improve his ability to steal second base off the hash.
5 (165) Jaylen

Samuels

AP-5’11 225

NC State 95 (3rd Round) Samuels never seems to be going at a speed where he allows himself to get out of control. While it works offensively, he will need to play with more of a sense of urgency to contribute consistently on special teams.
7 (246) Joshua

Frazier

DT-6’3 321

Alabama 494 (6th Round) Frazier exhibited a powerful long-arm to post back guards and centers. He is active but too often gets tied up losing to the spot.

Q&A with Cincinnati Bengals safety Clayton Fejedelem

Long before Cincinnati Bengals safety Clayton Fejedelem made it to the NFL, he made quite a statement in his final season for the Fighting Illini.  After starring at St. Xavier (an NAIA school in Illinois), Fejedelem decided to walk-on at Illinois in the spring of 2013. In his final season in the Big Ten, he led the conference with 140 tackles. DraftNasty's Corey Chavous caught up with the former high school wrestler during the week of the 2016 East-West Shrine game to find out what drives him day-to-day.

Corey: What's been the best experience so far this week in terms adjusting to these players after having such a good year in the Big Ten?

Fejedelem: It's nice coming down and getting the top players in the nation from all over the nation. So you get to kinda test your worth
against a lot more conferences, a lot more different styles of play, different offenses and it's pretty cool.  The coolest thing coming down here was getting the opportunity to talk to all those different scouts and all the guys you'll see in the future.

Corey:  When you look at your game and how it evolved, would you say one of the more underrated aspects was just how quick you triggered forward in some of the quick game stuff when you were in man coverage (like against Minnesota)?  Talk about your eyes and how you see things on the field.

Fejedelem: Absolutely.  I take pride in preparing myself for the game, watching the film so I get out there and it's muscle memory.  You only need to see a few keys and you already know the play that's coming.  I take pride in the speed that I play the game and I think that's one of my biggest assets.

Corey:  It seemed like there was competition between you and your other safety-mate (No. 3 Taylor Barton) when it came to just getting to the football and breaking on the football.  Was there a little inter-competition between you and him?

Fejedelem:  Me and Taylor Barton are pretty good friends off the field.  In practice, we're always messing with each other on who can get their hands on more footballs and in the game it's no different. That's how you get paid..so.  He came up on top with a few more interceptions than I did this year.

Corey: You had more tackles though.

Fejedelem: I had a lot more tackles. There were throwing his way because there were scared to throw my way.  That's the reason (laughs).

Corey:  That's what I like to hear.  Finally, you kind of remind me of one of my former teammates, the late Pat Tillman (Arizona Cardinals, 1998-01),  in your tenacity and ability to get to the football. Also in your ability to play special teams.  Who do you compare yourself to at the next level?

Fejedelem: Currently playing, probably Eric Weddle (Baltimore Ravens). He's out there and he' s kind of a savage.  I like his style
of play; he's very scrappy.  If I'm going back some years, I try to model my game as kind of a hybrid Ed Reed/Brian Dawkins.
Reed's ballhawking ability and he wasn't afraid to stick his neck in there. And Brian Dawkins was just an overall freak.  I try to hybrid
that.

Corey: Talk about your work in the weight room. What are your expectations in the short shuttle and other testing? Your coaches have talked about you being one of the faster players on the team. Tell us a little bit about your workout numbers, some of the stuff you've put up and what are your goals for the postseason?

Fejedelem:  Right.  I was one of the workout warriors as our head strength coach (former Illinois head strength coach Aaron Hillman) would say. I just enjoy the grind; I really do.  I think the more you prepare yourself in the offseason the better it's gonna be.  Even if you are the most talented player all the extra work is gonna make you that much better. I put the extra time in with the squats, the benching.  I did pretty well last summer with my 225-lb test; I'm shooting a little bit higher.  I think that test was 22 (reps); right around there.  I'm shooting for that 38-inch vertical; right around there.  And I'd like to get under a four (4.0) in the shuttle and 40 (yard dash), try to run that high 4.4.

Corey: That's awesome man.  We just want to wish you continued success and thank you for your time. Make it to the league.

Fejedelem: Thank you.  Appreciate it.

---Corey Chavous, 2016 East-West Shrine practices