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2021 NFL Draft Recap: Rounds 2-3

The second and third rounds of the 2021 NFL Draft are now complete. There were some surprises but teams generally went with profiles that match some of the current players on its own teams. We break down each selection through pick 105, with our respective Big Board rankings and grades. The Rams got another playmaker, the Buccaneers drafted a developmental quarterback, as did the Texans. The Raiders went back to Buffalo in search of another Mack truck, the Dolphins hunted for Long and the Steelers were Green with envy.

2nd Round      
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
33rd overallJacksonville JaguarsTyson Campbell6’2 194/CB-Georgia126/3rd RoundA big corner with good foot speed and at least satisfactory quickness. His balance is a characteristic that needs to improve, as does his ability to find the ball down the field in coverage.
34th overallNew York JetsElijah Moore5’9 184/WR-Ole Miss44/2nd RoundFrom the opening week breakout performance against Florida (10 receptions, 227 yards) through the rest of the season, he found ways to extricate Ole Miss out of trouble.
35th overallDenver Broncos (from Atlanta Falcons)Javonte Williams5'10 212/RB-UNC33/2nd RoundHis physicality, ball skills, short yardage capability and lack of mileage make him a very attractive option as a potential fourth quarter closer.
36th overallMiami DolphinsJevon Holland6’1 207/S-Oregon15/2nd RoundThe All-Pac-12 defender, and our top-ranked S/NB, is a former high school wide receiver with the instincts to anticipate ball location. It is a big reason why he made a number of plays versus fade patterns when defending slot receivers.
37th overallPhiladelphia EaglesLandon Dickerson6’6 326/C-Alabama56/2nd RoundDickerson presents a unique multiple skill-set for NFL teams, having started at four different offensive line positions. Availability has always been the concern for the former five-star recruit.
38th overallNew England Patriots (from Cincinnati Bengals)Christian Barmore6'5 310/DT-Alabama14/2nd RoundThe Philadelphia native is more of a heavyweight boxer than anything else. For him to truly evolve into a consistent disruptor at the next level, he has to master the intricacies of footwork versus different run blocking schemes.
39th overallChicago Bears (from Carolina Panthers)Tevin Jenkins6’6 317/OT-Oklahoma State20/2nd RoundJenkins needs more technique work, but he has improve for the most part during his career.
40th overallAtlanta Falcons (from Denver Broncos)Richie Grant5’11 197/S-UCF23/2nd Round
Grant finished his career with 10 interceptions largely as a result of his ability to steal bases on the football field.
41st overallDetroit LionsLevi Onwuziurike6’3 297 DT-Senior41/2nd RoundDespite not being an elite interior pass rusher, there is room for Onwuzurike to develop into more in that facet of his game.
42nd overallMiami Dolphins (from New York Giants)Liam Eichenberg6’6 303 OT-Notre Dame32/2nd RoundWhenever a collegian has outstanding technique NFL teams begin to wonder about upside. Maybe it should be the other way around.
Continued flexibility gains should be in order for the Saint Ignatius High School product, who earned All-American honors because he reduced the pre-snap mistakes.
43rd overallLas Vegas Raiders (from San Francisco 49ers)Trevon Moehrig6’1 202 S-TCU30/2nd RoundMoehrig’s smooth nature on the field hides any minor deficien-cies that may illuminate from some questionable tackling angles in space. His communicative nature is much-needed for a secondary that lacked it in 2020.
44th overallDallas CowboysKelvin Joseph5’11 1/2” 197/CB-Kentucky, LSU37/2nd RoundJoseph’s ability to squeeze routes from the outside-in in man or zone coverage is extremely impressive. There will be few cornerbacks in this year’s draft class with his level of fluidity. There were problems with communication in coverage.
45th overallJacksonville JaguarsWalker Little6’7 313/OT-Stanford167/3rd RoundLittle has not played for a two-year period. When he was on the field, his smooth nature stood out. Rarely did he get overwhelmed with the pace of the defensive end. Can he stay healthy?
46th overallCincinnati Bengals (from New England Patriots)Jackson Carman6’5 317/OT-Clemson88/3rd RoundSome of his blocks in space were highlight film worthy. He can lean on defenders with his mass. Managing his weight, however, could help alleviate some of the technical flaws. Did the weight contribute to the recent back surgery in January 2021?
47th overallLos Angeles ChargersAsante Samuel, Jr.5’10 184/CB-FSU90/3rd RoundSamuel, Jr’s journey to the NFL follows in his father’s footsteps and the comparisons are valid. Samuel, Jr. may not be quite as sudden, but he does have similar instincts in zone coverage.
Samuel, Jr.’s ability to read through the quarterback while using a skate-bail technique is eerily similar to his father’s while with the Patriots and Eagles.
48th overallSan Francisco 49ers (from Las Vegas Raiders)Aaron Banks6’5 338/OG-Notre Dame177/3rd RoundInside, he can move bodies with thump at the point of attack. His base will get too wide in pass protection and the challenge for him surrounds improving hand placement. Pass rushers have a tough time moving him if he can form a lockout and sit down in the chair.
49th overallArizona CardinalsRondale Moore5’7 180/WR-Purdue40/2nd RoundStrong in the lower body. Squats over 600 pounds. His ability to track the football overcomes a somewhat limited catch radius. Overall, he is a first-round talent with enough durability question marks to last until Day 2.
50th overallNew York Giants (from Miami Dolphins)Azeez Ojulari6’2 249/DE-OLB Georgia45/2nd RoundOjulari is a defensive end/outside linebacker with underrated strength and positive hand usage. There were occasions where his size created limitations, but he generally exhibited satisfactory upper body strength.
51st overallWashington Football TeamSamuel Cosmi6’6 314/OT-Texas62/2nd RoundCosmi has reserved a spot in scouts’ attention for the better portion of a two-year period. He’s balanced, quick and fluid in his movements at the left tackle spot.
52nd overallCleveland Browns (from Chicago Bears)Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah6’1 220/LB-Notre Dame24/2nd Round
Owusu-Koramoah plays the game as if blockers aren’t on the field. His skill at triggering allowed him to overcome some lower body stiffness. We thought he was the best special teams player we saw on film (see Georgia ‘19).
53rd overallTennessee TitansDillon Radunz6’6 300/OT-North Dakota State50/2nd RoundHe has worked on keeping a bent posture over the last year, and this despite appearing in just one game in 2020. There were never any question marks regarding the All-American’s pace, foot speed, or quickness.
54th overallIndianapolis ColtsDayo Odeyingbo6’5 285/DE-Vanderbilt52/2nd RoundA recent Achilles injury may hold back his draft stock, but teams with multiple defenses may go ahead and sit him for a redshirt year while he recovers. The second-team All-SEC defender has Day 2 value.
55th overallPittsburgh SteelersPat Freiermuth6’5 251 TE-Penn State85/3rd RoundFreiermuth, the 2020 Big Ten Tight End of the Year, earned the honor despite missing over half of the year due to a shoulder injury. Prior to that, he averaged nearly six catches and 78 receiving yards per game.
56th overallSeattle SeahawksD’Wayne Eskridge5’9 184/All-Purpose-Western Michigan115/3rd RoundDespite standing just 5-foot-9, he packs a solid 188 pounds on his frame. He breaks arm tackles and excels when he runs through the reception point, particularly on quick slants. His toughness is also exemplary, especially considering that he has played the cornerback position respectably and stood out crack blocking safeties. The 2020 MAC Special Teams Player of the Year fits the definition of an all-purpose prospect.
57th overallLos Angeles RamsTutu Atwell5’9 155/WR-Louisville141/3rd RoundIf there is a more electric, elusive, fully-charged offensive player in the draft we haven’t found him. NFL teams just have to know what they’re purchasing.
Is it former Louisville wide receiver and two-time Pro Bowler Ernest Givens (Houston Oilers) or former West Virginia star Tavon Austin?
58th overallKansas City ChiefsNick Bolton5’11 237/LB-Missouri77/3rd RoundThe positives include down-to-down intensity, pass coverage instincts and blitz capability. His treks on outside runs, varied depending on whether he took the backdoor on his angle to the ball. He is a quick-twitched, fast athlete with pop on contact.
59th overallCarolina Panthers (from Cleveland Browns)Terrace Marshall, Jr.6’3 205/WR-LSU29/2nd RoundSmart. Lines up at each of the receiver spots for the team. There are instances where he wins on the perimeter by not giving away catch indicators for the defensive back in man coverage (see Auburn 2019 vs. Igbinoghene).
Prior to fracturing his foot against Vanderbilt, Marshall led the nation with six touchdown receptions.
60th overallNew Orleans SaintsPete Werner6’2 240/LB-Ohio State103/3rd RoundWerner -a solid wrap tackler with range- offers NFL teams plenty of options. He can cover tight ends and line up as an off-or-on the ball linebacker. The former Buckeye contains comfort walking out over slot receivers (in zone or man). In fact, he was seen dropping into the deep middle one-third, as a two-deep safety and in a quasi robber position.
61st overallBuffalo BillsCarlos “Boogie” Basham6’3 1/2” 274 DE-Wake Forest36/2nd RoundFrom a technical perspective, Basham is pretty advanced with his pass rush moves working off the edge. Some teams won’t like his hand size and arm length, but he is slippery and strong in the lower body. Few players in the ACC matched Basham’s production.
62nd overallGreen Bay PackersJosh Myers6’5 310/OC-Ohio State168/3rd Round10 1/2” hands. Myers is capable of getting to most of his spots but his hand placement is a question mark. He is a fit in a zone blocking scheme and it might be at a guard position as opposed to center.
63rd overallKansas City ChiefsCreed Humphrey6’4 312/OC-Oklahoma51/2nd RoundThe 2020 Big 12 Offensive Lineman of the Year is a left-handed snapper with some flaws, but his technique, guile and football intelligence ensure him a good chance of becoming an NFL starter.
64th overallTampa Bay BuccaneersKyle Trask6’5 236/QB-Florida158/3rd RoundTrask is solid on in-breaking throws to tight ends, slants to his wideouts and crossing patterns. His uptick in production in 2020 largely involved an increased efficiency on fades, posts and out-breaking patterns. Much of this revolved around enhanced timing and anticipation. His physical skills are solid, if unspectacular.
3rd Round
SelectionTeamPlayer selectionPosition-SchoolDN Big Board Rank/GradeNotes
65th overallJacksonville JaguarsAndre Cisco6'0 203/FS-Syracuse54/2nd RoundThe fact that he can make a number of tough tackles hides some of the flaws on the makable misses. Nevertheless, his middle of the field instincts and overall activity are similar to former Wake Forest safety Jessie Bates (Cincinnati Bengals). Due to the ACL knee injury he suffered in October, his final draft position does not reflect his overall value.
66th overallMinnesota Vikings (from New York Jets)Kellen Mond6’3 211/QB-Texas A&M147/3rd RoundOverall, the Aggies’ all-time leader in total offense has a dual-threat game that largely translates to today’s NFL game. To put it all in perspective, he had 18 games with a rushing and passing touchdown in school.
67th overallHouston TexansDavis Mills6’4 225/ QB-Houston166/3rd RoundThe trend of injuries dates back to his high school days, where he was once ranked ahead of Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa in 247Sports’ 2017 rankings. So what does he bring to the table? Mills is an inexperienced quarterback with a smooth delivery, good mobility and an even-keeled nature. That calm in the face of the storm helped him deliver after falling behind in games as a junior.
68th overallAtlanta FalconsJalen Mayfield6’5 326/OT-Michigan68/2nd RoundDespite limited film, Mayfield was solid in the games viewed. Like former Philadelphia Eagles first-round pick Andre Dillard coming out of school, he takes a lot of the heat but wins most of his matchups due to his footwork.
69th overallCincinnati BengalsJoseph Ossai6’3 255/LB-Texas120/3rd RoundThe notes kept piling up for Ossai as we broke down his game. In 2019, we were not at all that impressed with his work at the exchange linebacker position. In 2020, he turned it on as a defensive end. He set the edge versus tight ends, flattened on run away and used hip swivel to turn the corner on occasion versus offensive tackles.
70th overallCarolina Panthers (from Philadelphia Eagles)Brady Christensen6’5 302/OT-BYU115/3rd RoundFor the most part, Christensen has been steady. There are some occasions where players get the best of him due to a questionable anchor (see Boyles, USF ’19; Wiley, UTSA ’20). In those instances, he has even been knocked to the ground. Christensen plays more with his feet than with his hand placement, so his strong postseason helped his value.
71st overallNew York Giants (from Denver Broncos)Aaron Robinson5’11 190/Nickel-UCF, Alabama58/2nd RoundRobinson fits the bill of what you need at the nickel back posi-tion in today’s NFL. Some of the most popular NFL route concepts feature crossers, in-breaking dig patterns. Of all the corners or nickel backs in this year’s draft class, he closes distance on these types of concepts with the most urgency.
72nd overallDetroit LionsAlim McNeill6’2 317/DT-NG-NC State72/2nd RoundMcNeill has all of the tools to be a legitimate first and second down force as a zero-technique nose guard. His strength is sudden, particularly after establishing hand placement inside the numbers of centers or guards. The All-ACC defensive tackle can win laterally or to a spot, but there are questions about his ability to finish as a pass rusher.
73rd overallPhiladelphia Eagles (from Carolina Panthers)Milton Williams6’3 284/DT-DE Louisiana Tech42/2nd RoundDue to Louisiana Tech’s lack of size on the three-man defensive front, he was used most frequently at the four-or-five-technique defensive end positions. He was also seen occasionally standing up to rush from an outside linebacker spot on third downs. There was a comfort level exhibited in his play to overpower some tackles and interior guards by dropping his shoulder, but he can play effectively with his hands to disengage.
74th overallWashington Football TeamBenjamin St. Juste6’3 205/CB-Minnesota, Michigan192/4th RoundHis footwork is clean, and this is why he was able to defend so effectively in the Red Zone. Ball skills are important. St. Juste didn’t have any interceptions, but he played through his inside shoulder to stay in-phase with wideouts in this part of the field.
75th overallDallas CowboysOsa Odighizuwa6’2 280/DT-UCLA106/3rd RoundHis feel for blocking schemes is inconsistent and he is still searching for secondary pass rush counters. Balance is something that needs to be monitored moving forward. At 280 pounds with 10 3/4-inch hands, it seems that he is destined for a role at defensive end in a three-man front.
76th overallNew Orleans Saints (from New York Giants)Paulson Adebo6’1 198/CB-Stanford47/2nd RoundAdebo put together one season of production in his career (2018) that essentially matched the career totals of the other highly-ranked cornerbacks in the 2021 NFL Draft. Aside from a Pro Day workout, he hadn’t been seen from NFL teams in person in over a year and a half.
Staying more square -in press or off-man coverage- could help Adebo develop into a front line starter.
77th overallLos Angeles ChargersJosh Palmer6’1 210/WR-Tennessee118/3rd RoundPalmer displayed all of the necessary tools during his final two seasons to suggest he can become a better pro than collegian. His stride closed the cushion on de-fensive backs. Palmer exhibited the length/dexterity to snag passes away from his frame and won against players who are going to be NFL draft picks.
78th overallMinnesota VikingsChazz Surratt6’2 227/LB-North Carolina132/3rd RoundSurratt is a converted QB and has limited reps as a linebacker although he did play safety in high school. The Tar Heels converted QB will be judged by his ability to learn the intricacies of the position, but in a short time he has shown the raw talent is there.
79th overallLas Vegas RaidersMalcolm Koonce6’2 249/DE-OLB-Buffalo102/3rd RoundKoonce, a former rugby star, was unable to perform for NFL teams this postseason after hurting his foot. After a couple of seasons where he was painstakingly difficult for offensive tackles to block, teams did not get to evaluate him further versus NFL-caliber competition. There are instances where teams can extrapolate his play against tougher offensive tackles (i.e. Penn State ‘19, Charlotte ‘19).
80th overallLas Vegas RaidersDivine Deablo6'3 226/S-LB-Virginia Tech78/3rd RoundPlayers like Deablo can become valuable pieces in today’s NFL. He may not quite have the fluidity to man a position off of the hash marks, but at 6-foot-3, 226 pounds, he may very well be positioned to play in sub-packages as a linebacker when teams use dime (six defensive backs) personnel. His experience will pay dividends, but he has to become more consistent as a tackler.
81st overallMiami DolphinsHunter Long6'5 253/TE-Boston College116/3rd RoundBased on the Eagles’ run-heavy schemes, he often got behind defenses because he was used as a hand in the dirt tight end. A solid in-line blocker with good, but not great strength, Long exudes a smoothness on the field that translates to Sundays. We were not necessarily impressed with the suddenness in which he got of his breaks, but at his size he doesn’t have to really be open. His 83-inch wingspan affords him to only have to get a step on the defender on tightly contested throws.
82nd overallWashington Football TeamDyami Brown6’1 189/WR-UNC86/3rd RoundThe former prep level 200-meter sprinter tracks the football over either shoulder and has shown good spatial awareness along the back end lines or sidelines. He has solid body control to adjust to poorly thrown passes. The biggest issue teams will have regarding the first-team All-ACC speedster revolves around the concentration lapses. They came in the form of penalties and dropped passes.
83rd overallCarolina Panthers (from Chicago Bears)Tommy Tremble6'4 248/H-back-Notre Dame79/3rd RoundTremble’s tempo will catch the eye of an evaluator. Quite simply, he plays the game at the right clip. The team moved him around all over the place and probably could have used him much more in the passing game. He is fluid in-and-out of cuts and displays quickness to go along with very good foot speed. It will be interesting to see how Carolina decides to use his skill-set.
84th overallDallas Cowboys (from Philadelphia Eagles)Chauncey Golston6’4 268/DE-Iowa74/3rd RoundGolston is easily one of the most valuable defensive lineman in this year’s draft. He can play the three-technique defensive tackle on passing downs, possible four-or-five-technique defensive end (three or four-man front) or rush as a stand-up outside linebacker. A veteran defensive coordinator may attempt to use the first-team All-Big Ten defender in all of the above-referenced roles.
85th overallGreen Bay Packers (from Tennessee Titans)Amari Rodgers5’9 212/WR-Clemson99/3rd RoundRodgers was just five months removed from a spring ACL tear (knee injury) in 2019, so did Tigers fans truly see the best he had to offer? If 2020 was any indication, then probably not. He looked stronger, more decisive and faster as a senior. In addition, his route-running savvy took another step forward. At 211 pounds, he is more than willing as a blocker, runs well after the catch and separates with timely cuts on option patterns.
86th overallMinnesota Vikings (from New York Jets)Wyatt Davis6’3 315/OG-Ohio State63/2nd RoundThe Big Ten Offensive Lineman of the Year has paved the way for Ohio State’s running game and likely a spot for himself early in the 2021 NFL Draft. We were probably most impressed with his ability to re-anchor in the pass protection aspect of his game. His ability to play with a base gives him a chance versus some of the quicker leverage-based defensive tackles he will face at the next level.
87th overallPittsburgh SteelersKendrick Green6'2 305/OL-Illinois48/2nd RoundGreen is one of the top interior offensive lineman available in this year’s class due to his combination of speed and pad level. The All-Big Ten guard excels with a low and balanced approach; particularly on combination blocks. He exhibits a level of savvy to cut-off backside defenders on run action away.
88th overallSan Francisco 49ers (from Los Angeles Rams)Trey Sermon6'0 216/RB-Ohio State, Oklahoma 57/2nd RoundHis strength is very good, as is his ability to pick his feet up through trash around his ankles and feet. We expect him to improve in pass protection due to his natural lower body explosiveness. He has upside as a receiver out of the backfield because he can make the first tackler miss in space. Durability issues aside, Sermon has starting potential in the NFL as a Melvin Gordon III-type (Denver Broncos).
89th overallHouston Texans (from Cleveland Browns)Nico Collins6’4 215/WR-Michigan157/3rd RoundAbove all else, it is his tremendous high-wire acts that grabbed the attention of scouts. In order to maximize those flurries of splashes, Collins has to play with more attention to detail.
90th overallMinnesota VikingsPatrick Jones II6’4 268/DE-Pittsburgh97/3rd RoundWe think the first-team All-American’s future in the NFL is as either a right defensive end or 30-front rush outside linebacker. As an outside linebacker, he will be able to operate with a little room to set up his pass rush moves. The former Virginia high school product has a game that blossomed the last two years after serving an apprenticeship role back in 2018 (23 tackles, 4 QB sacks, 7.5 TFLs, FF).
91st overallCleveland BrownsAnthony Schwartz6’0 186/WR-Auburn297/4th RoundSchwartz displayed all of the foot speed (4.28) and flashes to get NFL teams excited if they project him as a gadget-type prospect. We think he can be used in fly motion on speed sweeps, speed shovel passes and even on end-arounds. Despite not doing it collegiately, he could be an option as a kickoff returner.
92nd overallTennessee Titans (from Green Bay Packers)Monty Rice6’0 235/LB-Georgia93/3rd RoundThere were still the flash outstanding athletic plays from Rice in 2020 (see Tennessee), but a nagging foot injury hampered his effectiveness for stretches. The overall range and speed in his play are both in place. Rice plays a little bit narrow in his stance and tends to get too thick versus offensive linemen.
93rd overallBuffalo BillsSpencer Brown6’8 314/OT-Northern Iowa100/3rd RoundThe former eight-man Iowa high school football standout transitioned impressively to 11-man football. He’s gained nearly 100 pounds (94) since his high school days. His chest exposure is simply due to leverage, but his ability to sit down can be seen in the pre-snap, when his body is lower than the rest of his offensive line.
94th overallBaltimore RavensBen Cleveland6’6 354/OT-Georgia92/3rd RoundIn today’s NFL, however, he is going to have to make sure that he becomes more efficient in pass protection. This becomes even more paramount when you weigh in the 355-pound range. It is at least pretty well-distributed on his 6-foot-6 frame. His experience and anticipation of how teams would attack on line games was much better in 2020.
95th overallTampa Bay BuccaneersRobert Hainsey6’4 302/OG-Notre Dame127/3rd RoundDuring school, he often won with the shock in his punch on the perimeter. He would get into trouble with pad level (where he could get out-leveraged) or when he stopped his feet (forcing him to crossover in pass pro). Overall, his down-to-down consistency stood out in the film viewed.
96th overallNew England PatriotsRonnie Perkins6’2 1/2” 253/DE-OLB-Oklahoma65/2nd RoundStanding 6-foot-2, he is able to play with a forward lean while keeping good balance. Rarely is he extended too far over his toes.
Academic warrior. Plays in a three-point, two-point or four-point stances on the edge.
97th overallLos Angeles ChargersTre’ McKitty6'4 246/TE-H-back-Georgia, FSU193/4th RoundMcKitty is a muscular H-back/TE-type who has moved around in a variance of roles for two different programs. We have seen him understand angles in the blocking game, show run after the catch skill and attack the seams of defenses. Despite never being the lead receiver at either Georgia or FSU, McKitty has frequently been a legitimate third down target.
98th overallDenver BroncosQuinn Meinerz6’3 320/OL-Wisconsin-Whitewater225/4th RoundThere is no doubt that his explosion, play strength and even hand usage can impress down-to-down. However, the top-heavy nature finds him on the ground when the detonations are launched at the wrong entry points to connect on opponents. Finding a balance will be key for Meinerz whether he stays at offensive guard or moves to center, where he performed admirably in the postseason.
99th overallDallas CowboysNahshon Wright6’4 188/CB-Oregon State357/5th RoundWright is a tall corner with good feet and a solid backpedal. His challenge will be to constrict his movements in tight areas when it is time to transition versus quicker receivers. For him to do that, he must find a happy medium between being comfortable and not playing too low. His feet don't always stay planted in the ground when flipping to open or break at 45-or-90-degree angles.
100th overallTennessee TitansElijah Molden5'9 1/2" 192/Nickel-Washington74-2nd RoundNumbers may not tell the entire story for Molden, who seems to be a player capable of filling a myriad of roles for an NFL defense. Despite being primarily a nickel back during school (even on first/second down), there are possibilities for him working off the hash.
Molden has very good quickness, change of direction and elite eye speed.
101st overallDetroit LionsIfeatu Melifonwu6’3 213/CB-Syracuse187/3rd RoundHis tackling was solid for the most part, but he did not attack stalk blocks with a dominant mentality. Overall, Melifonwu played with awareness and attacked the three-step passing game. After a solid Senior Bowl week, he should hear his name called early on Day 3 of the draft process.
102nd overallSan Francisco 49ersAmbry Thomas6’0 187/CB-Michigan53/2nd RoundOn the outside, he needs to be technique-sound because he is not necessarily a long corner. Thomas has lost quite a bit of practice time over the past two seasons and the fact that he has been able to still perform at a high level bodes well for his future prospects.
103rd overallLos Angeles RamsErnest Jones6'2 230/LB-South Carolina258/4th RoundJones, a junior-entry in the 2021 NFL Draft, has many tools worth taking a long look at for NFL teams. One of the things he has to improve at is getting offensive linemen off of his defensive linemen.
We think he would fit best as a run-and-chase Will linebacker at the next level because he still has to room to grow reading the triangle.
104th overallBaltimore RavensBrandon Stephens6’1 219/CB-SMU277/4th RoundStephens is a former running back who transitioned to cornerback in college and did so admirably. One of the things that makes that transition so hard is you’re seeing the game from the outside-in as opposed to inside-out. Technically, he is going to have to work on some things if he plans to stay on the perimeter.
105th overallDenver BroncosBaron Browning6’3 240/LB-Ohio State26/2nd RoundBrowning is a prospect who can rush versus offensive tackles off the edge, play the exchange linebacker and line up over tight ends. As a pass rusher out of his two-point stance on the edge, his speed can be too much to handle for offensive tackles.

2018 Season Preview: Florida Gators

Season outlook

The Florida Gators poached new head coach, Dan Mullen, from conference foe, Mississippi State, during the offseason. The Gators hope Mullen, who amassed a 69-46 overall record and 33-39 conference record, can bring a level of consistently to Gainesville. Mullen previously served as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coached during Florida’s heyday between 2005-2008. The Gators head coach will have to choose between three underclassmen to take  the command at quarterback.  Sophomores Feleipe Franks (6’5, 227) and Kyle Trask (6’5, 239) will battle freshman Emory Jones (6’2, 192) for the starting role. Whoever is under center, will have junior wide receiver Tyrie Cleveland (6’2, 205)to depend on. Cleveland finished last season with 410 receiving yards and two touchdowns.  Cleveland should be able to stretch defenses with the deep ball.  Defensively, the Gators project to be further ahead of the curve than the offense.  The Gators have playmakers at each level on defense.  Senior defensive end Cece Jefferson (6’1, 242) has totaled 28.5 tackles for loss and 9.5 sacks over his three years in Gainesville. Jefferson, pictured left,  plays with strong leverage and can set the edge.  In the middle, junior inside linebacker David Reese leads the defensive huddle and junior defensive back Chauncey Gardner-Johnson (6’0, 207) patrols the back end, playing on the outside and in the nickel. Gardner-Johnson has five career interceptions. The Gators aren’t expected to contend for a national championship like they were during Mullen’s first stint at Florida, but defensively look for marked improvement.

Troy’s player to watch

33 David Reese 6’1 248 LB- Junior
After missing the entire 2017 offseason recovering from wrist surgery, Reese came back with a vengeance, leading the Gators in tackles with 102 and finishing second on the team with 10 tackles for loss. The junior linebacker also totaled 1.5 sacks and an interception. The Farmington, Michigan native will be tasked with leading the defense from his middle linebacker position. Reese, a solid tackler, is as dependable as they come in the middle of a defense.

Game of the season

September 29th against Mississippi State
Head coach Dan Mullen will return to Starkville to face his former team during the fifth week of the season. The Bulldogs finished 9-4 last season in Mullen’s ninth and final season as Mississippi State’s head coach. The storylines will be plentiful and the two teams should be evenly matched. The Gators are looking to get back to a bowl game and beating a conference foe will be crucial.

 

Prediction: 7-5

Draftnasty’s Troy Jefferson is predicting a 7-5 record and a bowl game appearance for the Florida Gators. Mullen’s crew will fall to some of the upper echeloncompetition in the SEC including LSU, Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. The Gators will also fall to in-state rival Florida State but will win enough games to inspire confidence in the new head coach.