Tag Archives: Marquez Valdes-Scantling

Green Bay Packers 2022 NFL Draft/UDFA recap

The Packers went into the draft with the apparent emphasis on upgrading a defensive front seven that finished right outside of the Top Ten in rush defense. The physical similarities between current DT Kenny Clark and new draft pick Devonte Wyatt are striking. Second-round pick Christian Watson has a chance to blossom with his ability to track the football down the field. He needs to replace the deep strike potential of former Packer Marquez Valdes-Scantling (Chiefs).

The Packers definitely upgraded the depth at linebacker and on the offensive line. It would have been hard to imagine getting Rasheed Walker in the seventh round just two seasons ago. Rhyan in the third round feels like a huge find as well, but where does he start off at, guard or tackle? Either way, the team has increased competition at all of the interior line spots.

Former Wake Forest LT Zach Tom (pictured), aligned at center for the Demon Deacons in 2019. Where will he play for the Packers?

The team did not get the immediate return on investment with Amari Rodgers returning kickoffs a year ago. This means that Watson, fourth-round pick Romeo Doubs or even UDFA Tyler Goodson could all get looks to provide competition.

Green Bay Packers
     
Round,
Selection,
PlayerSchoolDN Big Board
Rank/
Grade
‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (22)Quay Walker
LB/Georgia49/2nd RoundWalker's combination of size and speed make the team's depth at linebacker now a strength defensively.
1 (28)
Devonte Wyatt
DT/Georgia22/2nd RoundDevonte Wyatt could become a legitimate complement to Pro Bowler Kenny Clark. If not, then a rotation player who spells him in a rotation at times.
2 (34)
Christian Watson
All-Purpose/North Dakota State23/2nd RoundChristian Watson's combination of body control and field speed make for a threat in a number of ways on the field. How will the team decide to employ him?
3 (92)
Sean Rhyan
OL/UCLA36/2nd RoundRhyan's run blocking prowess was supplemented with a technically-sound, yet quick-footed nature as a pass protector. If he moves to OG, he'll be battling two second-year starters for playing time.
4 (132)
Romeo DoubsAll-Purpose (WR-Ret)/Nevada149/3rd RoundDoubs' skill as a punt returner was often overshadowed by his deep receiving skills. He has tracked a number of deep passes 50-to-60 yards down the field effectively. In addition, he proved to be more than just a deep threat the last two seasons.
4 (140)
Zach Tom
C-OG/Wake Forest60/2nd RoundTom's experience at left tackle only enhances his value. His film working at the center position in 2019 was impressive as well. He ranks as one of the better swing lineman in this year's class.
5 (179)Kingsley Enagbare
DE/South Carolina 122/3rd RoundEnagbare's rare length (83 5/8" wingspan) could endear him on the edge as a depth piece for the team's outside linebacker position. Enagbare has stood up in school and he even played some LB on third downs.
7 (228)Tariq Carpenter
S-LB/Georgia Tech293/4th RoundCarpenter made the move to LB in the postseason and acquitted himself well. During his time in school, he was an active defender who made 41 career starts mostly at the safety position.
7 (234)Jonathan Ford
DT/Miami (Fla.)599/6th RoundFord has the flex capability to align up-and-down the defensive front. Ford posted three quarterback sacks back in 2019.
7 (249)Rasheed WalkerOT/Penn State107/3rd RoundTwo years ago, Walker had an opportunity to possibly be a higher pick. With that said, he could find a home as a third tackle for the Packers. . At the least, he increases their options during training camp.
7 (258)Samori Toure
WR/Nebraska, Montana 134/3rd RoundToure has the tools to be an effective WR in the cold of Green Bay after playing in Montana first (lows in the mid-twenties) and then Nebraska (mid-forties). Toure is smooth, but has to get stronger.
Packers 2022 UDFA signings
Rank PlayerPositionsSchoolGradeRoundNasty’ Take
415Tyler GoodsonRBIowa55th RoundGoodson’s foot speed, hard-charging style and underrated receiving ability (the team often aligned him at the X-WR) could make him hard to get rid of in training camp. Can the 4.4 speedster returns kicks?
678Caleb JonesOTIndiana 3.847th RoundIt will all come down to how Jones handles the speed aspect of the NFL game. At 6’8, 370 pounds, with nearly 37-inch arms, it is impossible to get around him if he measures up the opponent.
686Akial ByersDTMissouri3.727th RoundPostseason workouts did him no favors, but Byers’ work in school indicated a player well worth the price of admission. Byers fights through angle blocks well and has a feel for the action working inside at 310 pounds.
674Cole SchneiderOC-OGUCF3.9087th RoundSchneider competed with leverage, power and underrated athleticism despite being length-deficient in school. There are some similarities to former Packers OL Lane Taylor.
220Chauncey ManacDE-OLBLouisiana-Lafayette, Georgia5.574th RoundAnother former Georgia Bulldog in the 2022 draft class, Manac turned it on as a senior, finishing with 10 QB sacks and career-highs in tackles for losses.
175Ellis BrooksLBPenn State5.684th RoundBrooks size, foot speed and overall athleticism may not get high marks, but he was the heartbeat of Penn State’s defense.
372Tre SterlingSOklahoma State5.115th RoundSterling’s movement skills impress despite less than stellar workout numbers to match across the board. His change of direction drills match the smoothness you see from him. He missed a lot of time as a senior and that may have hurt his standing with NFL teams.
547Keke ChismWRMissouri, Angelo State4.526th RoundChism is a body control, jump ball specialist who doesn’t run extremely well until he builds to speed. His acrobatic TD catch in the 2021 Armed Forces Bowl is kind of what he brings to the table.
508B.J. Baylor RBOregon State4.656th RoundA one-year wonder at Oregon State, there is no shame in that label after leading the Pac-12 in rushing. He can make the slide cuts and crease defenses. Baylor has to improve in pass protection.
Hauati PututauDEUtahN/AN/APututau’s strength gets high marks, as does his size at over 6-foot-3, 310 pounds.
Danny Davis WRWisconsinN/AN/AFor a 6-foot receiver, he has range. Has made some incredible extension grabs on slant routes with range as a pass catcher (3rd and 7, 4th QTR/3:00, Penn State '21). Beat the man coverage of a longer CB on the play (Castro-Fields).
Raleigh TexadaCBBaylorN/AN/ACan he match up outside consistently? Struggles to disengage off of stalk blockers on the perimeter (2nd QTR/4:59, Texas Tech '21). Positive feet and patience to squeeze routes from the outside-in when playing man coverage (Kansas State '21). Bail technique is clean, smooth and capable.
Anthony TurnerWRGrand ViewN/AN/AThe 6-foot-3-inch wideout has some suddenness and feel for the WR spot. Despite playing against a lower level of competition, the NAIA All-American’s twitch on video stood out. His size translates to the next level.

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: NFC North

NFC North

 

Green Bay Packers

Alexander (No. 10 pictured) may be relied upon to work at the nickel back spot for the Packers.

Notable picks: Alexander and Jackson could eventually develop into the two outside starting cornerbacks. Alexander’s ability to return kicks, play outside or in the slot makes him one of the more versatile players in the 2018 NFL Draft. The potential combination of Alexander, Jackson and Kevin King could be game-changing for the Packers secondary.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (18) Jaire

Alexander CB-5’10 196

Louisville 40 (2nd Round) Teams relied heavily on his outstanding 2016 film. Believes in his recipe. Will he play the nickel with Jackson and King on the outside.
2 (45) Josh

Jackson

CB-6’0 196

Iowa 55 (2nd Round) Jackson is used to this part of the country and the elements won’t be a factor. His ball skills will aid a defense which finished 23rd in pass defense.
3 (88) Trade from Carolina Oren

Burks

LB-6’3 233

Vanderbilt 71 (3rd Round) Burks adds another coverage linebacker to a group that needs more on-field speed. The former safety has all of the tools to develop into at least a nickel contributor in Year 1.
4 (133) J’Mon

Moore

WR-6’3 207

Missouri 160 (3rd Round) Moore was the rare SEC wide receiver to post back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons.
5 (138) Cole

Madison

OL-6’5 307

Washington St. 127 (3rd Round) Former TE with good feet, durability and tackle experience. While he played RT in school, he could battle former UCF star Justin McCray (8 starts in 2017) for playing time at OG.
5 (172) JK

Scott

P-6’6 208

Alabama 411 (5th Round) Four-year starter who punted and kicked off the ‘Tide. Can be dominant kicking in Domes. Catch-and-kick times average between 1.15 and 1.25 seconds. Reminiscent of former Clemson punter Bradley Pinion.
5 (174) Marquez

Valdes-Scantling

WR-6’4 207

USF 281 (4th Round) Valdes-Scantling built on a good junior campaign with a breakout senior campaign.
6 (207) Equanimeous

St. Brown

WR-6’5 214

Notre Dame 80 (3rd Round) St. Brown probably may have more to give than even the team’s fifth-round pick. Regardless of the team’s QB play, he didn’t finish on the ball as well in 2017.
7 (232) James

Looney

DL-6’3 287

California 243 (4th Round) NFL bloodlines are complemented by a steady diet of lateral quickness and strong hands. He is an inconsistent pass rusher and Tyson Alualu-type.   35 ½” VJ.
7 (239) Hunter

Bradley

LS-6’3 241

Mississippi State N/A (long snappers, page 388 of Corey Chavous’ 2018 Draft Guide) Bradley, a long snapper, ran in the 4.7-range and was a big reason for P Logan Cooke’s success.
7 (248) Kendall

Donnerson

DE-6’3 250

SE Missouri State N/A Donnerson turned heads in private workouts prior to the draft with a 40” VJ and 10’11” BJ.

 

 

Chicago Bears

Smith’s ability (No. 3 pictured) to run down plays laterally could increase the speed of an already formidable Bears rush defense.

Notable Pick: Smith could make life painful for opposing running backs as he combines with playmaker Danny Trevathan. He rejoins former Georgia Bulldog teammate Leonard Floyd.   All of the linebackers will have to pay attention to fourth-round pick Joel Iyiebuniwe. He could challenge for playing time.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (8) Roquan

Smith

6’1 236

Georgia 13 (1st Round) Smith’s speed will increase a defensive unit that is going…all the way up.
2 (39) James

Daniels

6’4 295

Iowa 41 (2nd Round) Daniels has he mobility to challenge for a starting offensive guard spot right away. In addition, he is athletic enough to backup at a tackle position.
2 (51) Anthony

Miller

5’11 201

Memphis 43 (2nd Round) Miller’s quickness will open up options on the outside or in the slot. His play speed will make him a major option in the run-pass-option game with Trubisky.
4 (115) Joel

Iyiebuniwe

LB-6’1 229

Western Kentucky 112 (3rd Round) The Bears continue to overhaul their LB corps with a ‘backer who can run and hit.
5 (145) Bilal

Nichols

DT-6’3 306

Delaware 97 (3rd Round) Nichols very easily could have gone higher if not for questions regarding his pad level. He could provide a challenge for DE Jonathan Bullard.
7 (224) Javon

Wims

WR-6’4 215

Georgia,

Belhaven

223 (4th Round) The Bears took a late-round flyer on a player who excelled adjusting to tough passes in 2017. He’s another tall, long wideout in the mold of current Bears Robinson and White. Can he play special teams?

 

 

 

Minnesota Vikings

Carlson connected on 13 field goals of 50 or more yards in school.

Notable pick: Carlson’s ability to hit field goals near the midfield mark will extend the team’s offensive range. Jalen Holmes brings positional versatility to the table and could be a big factor on third downs rushing from an interior line position.   Aruna could become a Day 3 find with his immense level of athleticism.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Mike

Hughes

CB-5’10 183

UCF 16 (2nd Round) Hughes not only offers sub-package immediate potential, he is one of the draft’s best returners.
2 (62) Brian

O’Neill

OT-6’6 298

Pittsburgh 66 (3rd Round) O’Neill has starting potential as a left tackle if he can learn to sit down with more urgency.
4 (102)

 

Jalen

Holmes

DE-6’5 283

Ohio State 156 (3rd Round) Holmes can play up-and-down a defensive front.   He is improving with his hand usage.
5 (167) Daniel

Carlson

PK-6’5 223

Auburn 267 (4th Round) Despite six blocked kicks in school, he kicked 13 field goals of 50 yards or more.
6 (213) Colby

Gossett

OL-6’5 311

Appalachian State 105 (3rd Round) Gossett started 37 games at RG, 8 games at RT and one game at OC in school.
6 (218) Ade

Aruna

OLB-6’5 262

Tulane 219 (3rd Round) Former two-star recruit was much better in 2016 when he stood up as a two-point OLB much of the year.
7 (225) Devante

Downs

LB-6’1 245

California 515 (6th Round) Downs finished his career with 211 tackles and five interceptions despite missing significant time as a senior.   His eye speed makes up for ordinary explosion.

 

Detroit Lions

Johnson’s workhorse mentality was complemented with an ability to throw the halfback pass.

Notable picks: Detroit went into this draft with the desire to get more physical on both sides of the ball. They drafted Johnson to run behind Ragnow and then selected the draft’s best blocking fullback in Bawden. Johnson will make-or-break this crop. If he can provide a one-two punch with some of the current Lions backs, it will finally take pressure off of Matthew Stafford.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (20) Frank

Ragnow

C-6’5 307

Arkansas 121 (3rd Round) Ragnow has always carried starter-traits, but leverage can be an issue for him vs. squatty nose guards.
2 (43) Trade from New England Kerryon

Johnson

RB-5’11 213

Auburn 101 (3rd Round) Johnson’s power and stride length make him look like a 6’2 runner on the field. He contains underrated lower body explosiveness at 213 pounds.   Easy mover.
4 (114) from New England Da’Shawn

Hand

DL-6’4 297

Alabama 137 (3rd Round) Hand is a player with heavy hands and an ability to defend the run. He may never be a great pass rusher, but he fits the profile desired on an underrated defensive front.
 
5 (153) Tyrell

Crosby

OT-6’5 319

Oregon 14 (1st Round) Crosby ranks as one of the best steals of the draft.   He may not look the part, but his 11-inch hands and 35-inch arms will make a difference at the right tackle spot.
7 (237) Nick

Bawden

FB-6’2 240

San Diego State 210 (4th Round) Bawden –a former college quarterback- reads through defenses with an ability to seek and destroy.   A true passion player with huge upside as a blocker. He adds substance to the team’s desire to run effectively in December.