Category Archives: In-game reports

Michigan vs. Ohio State, 11-24-18: In-game report

Michigan and Ohio State met on Saturday at the “Horseshoe” with a spot in the Big Ten Championship and possibly a spot in the College Football Playoff on the line. Ohio State capitalized on Michigan’s special teams errors in the second half and rode its offensive and defensive lines to a 62-39 victory.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

9 Donovan Peoples-Jones (6’2, 208) Michigan wide receiver-Sophomore 

Peoples-Jones made all types of grabs on Saturday and when his team needed plays on late down situations, he was the man targeted. The sophomore wide receiver finished with seven catches for 64 yards against the Buckeyes.  Peoples-Jones isn’t afraid to make catches over the middle but will be a problem at the next level on the outside because of his quick feet and his ability to accelerate and de-celerate to relieve himself of tight coverage.  For the season, the sophomore has caught 39 passes for 541 yards and seven touchdowns.   The sophomore is also a threat as a punt returner (two career punt return touchdowns and averages 9 yards a return). 

Ohio State offensive and defensive lines

Chase Young (No. 2 pictured) has 5.5 quarterback sacks and 10.5 tackles for loss for the Buckeyes entering the 2018 Big Ten Championship game.

Michigan came into Columbus with the nation’s top-ranked defense and a huge reason why was because of their ability to pressure the quarterback with four men.  However, by games end, Ohio State’s offensive and defensive line had stolen the show. The Buckeyes didn’t give up a sack and sacked Michigan junior quarterback Shea Patterson (6’2, 205) three times.  In the fourth quarter on 3rd and 12, Buckeyes defensive end Chase Young (6’5, 265) flushed Patterson from the pocket and made him throw off-balance, which led to an interception by junior safety Jordan Fuller (6’2 204). Defensive linemen Robert Landers (6’1 283) and Jonathon Cooper (6’4 257) also contributed with sacks. Offensively, the Buckeyes rushed for 249 yards and passed for 318 yards.  

“They slowly devastated us throughout the game. Knowing all the yards they were putting up and how easily they were scoring, it was tough. It was very tough,” Michigan senior defensive back Tyree Kinnel said in a post game press conference. “They completely beat us everywhere. Run game, pass game, everyone is to blame.”

7 Dwayne Haskins (6’3, 220) Ohio State QB-Sophomore
Haskins has set Big Ten passing marks for passing yards (4.081) and touchdown passes (42) in 2018.

Haskins seems to be getting more and more comfortable as the season goes on. The Potomac, Maryland, native completed 19-of-30 passes for 318 yards and five touchdowns on Saturday.  Despite the big game atmosphere, Haskins never forced any throws against a stout Michigan defense.  Aided by a strong running game and a clean pocket, he picked the Wolverines apart.  Haskins has the arm to make all the throws and is big enough to shake defenders off.  If the sophomore can continue to play with the poise he showed on Saturday, look for him to continue to move up future NFL Draft boards.

39 Malik Harrison (6’3, 245) Ohio State LB-Junior 
Harrison has contributed 8.5 tackles for losses for the Buckeyes in 2018 (as of 11/27/18).

Harrison impressed with his form tackling ability against the Wolverines. The junior linebacker used his eyes well and was able to make tackles on Michigan senior running back Karan Higdon (5’10 202) by being patient and meeting Higdon in his running lanes. Harrison can also be used in blitz packages.   He sacked Patterson on the second play of the game when he came into the backfield untouched.  For a player his size, Harrison has excellent sideline-to- sideline ability  yet is strong enough to take on interior linemen in the running game.  Harrison projects best as a 4-3 outside linebacker. 

Cincinnati vs. UCF, 11-17-18: In-game report

A fast paced offense and some self-inflicted wounds aided UCF to its 23rd straight victory. The Knights defeated the  Cincinnati Bearcats, 38-13, and clinched a spot in the AAC championship in the process. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

UCF offense 

They aren’t called UCFast for nothing. The Knights play at one of the fastest paces in college football and have the players at the skill positions to make it work.  They currently average 43 points per game and scored 38 against Cincinnati, who hadn’t given up for more than 30 in the six games previous.  The list of contributors offensively is exhaustive.  Six different players caught at least one pass and five different players ran the ball at least once.  In his first season as head coach, Josh Heupel has carried over some of the spread principles that he used in Oklahoma under Bob Stoops. Junior quarterback McKenzie Milton (5’11, 185) isn’t the prospect that Sam Bradford was coming out of Oklahoma under Heupel’s tutelage, but the UCF quarterback is putting up reminiscent numbers.  The Knights will need a lot of help to get into the College Football Playoff but even if they don’t make it, their offense will pose a big problem to any Power 5 team because of the one-on-one matchups they can create week-to-week. 

UCF defensive ends 

Davis, pictured, has 15.5 tackles for loss for the Knights entering the team’s AAC Championship Game.

Senior defensive end Titus Davis (6’3, 250) and junior defensive end Brendon Hayes (6’3, 293) are two premier pass rushers who feast on opposing quarterbacks once UCF takes big leads. The two tag- teamed for a turnover in the second quarter, when Davis met Cincinnati freshman quarterback Desmond Ridder (6’4, 212) in the backfield, forcing a fumble that Hayes recovered.  For the game, Davis finished with three sacks, bringing his season total to six. Hayes, the better edge-setter and run defender between the two, had five tackles and a pass deflection.

Cincinnati mistakes 

Before the Bearcats could settle down, they were already in a hole. In the first half alone, the Bearcats lost a fumble, missed a field goal, had a field goal blocked and missed an extra point. 

“We generated some momentum early in the game and gave it right back to them, whether it was a missed field goal or extra point or something like that,” Cincinnati head coach Luke Fickell said. “When you’re playing the champs, when you’re playing a team as good as they are, you can’t have mishaps like that.”

For the game, the Bearcats were comparable when it came to total yards and third down efficiency. But the early lopsided score made the Bearcats one-dimensional and turned what could have been a close game into a blowout. 

Mississippi State vs. Alabama, 11-10-18: In-game report

A pair of sophomores on different sides of the ball are leading the charge for the top-ranked Alabama Crimson Tide.  Behind its star quarterback and dominant defensive line,  Alabama defeated Mississippi State, 24-0.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

13 Tua Tagovailoa (6’1, 218) Alabama QB-Sophomore  

While a bit undersized, Tua Tagovailoa has the traits of an NFL starting quarterback.  His excellent feet and natural throwing motion stood out once again on Saturday.  In the first quarter, the sophomore perfectly lofted a pass to junior tight end Irv Smith, Jr. (6’4, 240) at the one-yard line near the sideline between two defensive backs. The pass led to a one-yard rushing touchdown. The Hawaii native is also athletic enough to still be able to evade pressure even while dealing with a knee injury that requires him to wear a brace. When the pocket breaks down, Tagovailoa is able to sense it and tries to run.  This can be good and bad.  The positive is that once it led to a 10-yard first down pickup.   On the negative side, Tagovailoa was sacked four times partly because he refused to throw the ball away and sank in the pocket.  He has a lot of the tools to be successful at the next level but I will be interested to see how he improves when it comes to not taking unnecessary sacks. The sophomore quarterback completed 14-of-21 passes for 164 yards with one touchdown and one interception. 

92 Quinnen Williams (6’4, 289) Alabama DL-Sophomore 

Williams is one of the coveted defensive lineman in college football because he can play both the run and the pass. Against the pass, Williams was able to use a rip move and get up field to force a sack at the end of the first quarter.  Against the run, Williams plays with great leverage, which allows him to keep a low base and take on multiple interior linemen.  Williams (5 sacks on the season) is violent with his hands and should be able to contribute immediately in either a 4-3 front as a defensive tackle or 3-4 scheme in the NFL as a defensive end. 

Mississippi State blitz packages 

The Bulldogs mustered just 169 yards of total offense but on defense, they may have been on to something that could help other teams in their quest to dethrone Alabama.  Defensive coordinator Bob Shoop’s unit held Alabama to 305 total yards, which was 200 less than its season average.  They sacked Tagovailoa four times when Alabama had come into the game with just six sacks allowed.  Shoop did it with a variety of blitzes from a number of directions. Three different players accounted for the four sacks.  Sophomore linebacker Willie Gay, Jr. (6’2, 235) led the team with two sacks and also had an interception.  Gay, Jr. was used as a blitzer on multiple occasions prior to his interception, and he was able to fool Tagovailoa by dropping into coverage on the pick.  The numbers will show a blowout but the Bulldogs defense gave Alabama all they could handle. 

Stanford vs. Washington, 11-3-18: In-game report

Washington and Stanford squared off in Seattle as both teams try to keep pace with first place Washington State in the Pac-12. The Huskies got off to a quick start and were able to hang on for a 27-23 victory. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

13 Alijah Holder (6’2 188) Stanford CB-Senior 

Holder may not have the height of former Cardinal CB/WR Richard Sherman, but there are some striking similarities. The senior cornerback is always around the football like Sherman and has eight pass deflections on the season and a forced fumble. Holder is best in press coverage but again -like Sherman- could be susceptible when forced to move his hips and keep up with quick-twitched receivers. The senior projects best at the next level as a Cover 3/ press-man cornerback.  Against Washington, Holder finished with three pass deflections and seven tackles. His production and big play ability (five forced fumbles and two interceptions on the season) will grab scouts attention as we move closer to the end of the regular season.

3 Jake Browning (6’2 210) Washington QB- Senior 

Browning may have done himself a disservice by returning to school as this season his numbers are more pedestrian, throwing 13 touchdowns to eight interceptions. The senior quarterback was benched against California earlier in the season,  and this comes just two seasons after leading the Huskies to a College Football Playoff Appearance by throwing 43 touchdowns and nine interceptions. Browning has somewhat of a herky-jerky delivery and throws the ball with little arch.  However, Browning , who grew up just two hours away from San Francisco, could be beneficial in an offense like the 49ers for example, who move the pocket and value accuracy. The Folsom, California native has a slight frame but he is an experienced leader with four years of experience behind center.  Look for Browning to be drafted in the later rounds and start his career as a backup. 

20 Bryce Love (5’10 202) Stanford RB- Senior

The first thing that jumps out about Bryce Love is his excellent vision and patience. The senior running back allowed the play to develop in front of him before cutting back and breaking a tackle to score a touchdown in the third quarter. Love, who has 490 rushing yards on the season, won’t come close to the 2,118 yards he posted a year ago.  The Wake Forest, North Carolina native has dealt with an ankle injury this season and his team has been behind in a fair share of their contests, nullifying his ability out of the backfield. The production, vision and experience are there for Love, but he will have to work on his pass protection and catching ability at the next level.  Against Washington, Love finished with 71 rushing yards on 18 touches.  

Navy vs. Notre Dame, 10-27-18: In-game report

Notre Dame and Navy traveled to San Diego to rekindle a rivalry. However, an efficient offense and a fundamentally sound defense allowed the Fighting Irish to make quick work of the Midshipmen, winning 44-22.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report: 

53 Sam Mustipher (6’2 306) Notre Dame OL-Senior 

DraftNasty highlighted Mustipher in our season preview to begin the season and in 2018, the Fighting Irish senior lineman has remained a constant positive for the offense. Mustipher routinely finished blocks against Navy with a little extra force and he isn’t afraid to mix it up with defensive lineman that are his size or bigger. However, what makes Mustipher an NFL-caliber interior lineman is his ability to get to the second level quickly like he did against Navy linebacker Taylor Heflin (6’2 229).  Mustipher was able to move Heflin out of the way with ease, paving the way for the team’s second rushing touchdown of the night.  The Irish rank in the top third in the nation in passing yards, rushing yards and points per game and Mustipher’s expertise along the line is a huge reason why.

12 Ian Book (6’0 203) Notre Dame QB-Junior 

Book has put together a five-game winning streak since he took over as the starting quarterback against Wake Forest.  One of the reasons, head coach Brian Kelly moved on from senior quarterback Brandon Wimbush (6’2, 222) is because Book is more efficient in the passing game.  Wimbush was pulled after tallying four interceptions and one touchdown in his three starts to begin the year.  Since being named the starter, Book has thrown 13 touchdowns and four interceptions while completing 76-percent of his passes. Book’s accuracy is on par with some of the best in college football, and his best throws against Navy came on a pair of back-shoulder throws to senior wide receiver Miles Boykin (6’4 228), which both resulted in touchdowns. Book has also rushed for 162 yards and three touchdowns.  The California native’s mobility to evade the rush and his pinpoint accuracy should be enough continue to carry the Fighting Irish offense.

Notre Dame defense vs. Navy offense

The Midshipmen pride themselves on their triple option offensive attack but against the Irish they couldn’t get anything going. Notre Dame jumped out to a 27-0 advantage in the first half and by that point the Midshipmen were too far behind to make a difference. The Fighting Irish defensive line routinely overpowered Navy’s front five. The defensive line was able to keep senior linebacker Te’von Coney (6’1 240) clean of blockers and allow him to make 14 tackles. As a whole, the defense forced three turnovers and four three-and- outs.  If the Fighting Irish can stick to the assignment football that won them the game against Navy, then they should be able to continue to challenge for a spot in the College Football Playoff.

Appalachian State vs. Georgia Southern, 10-25-18: In-game report

Appalachian State (5-2, 3-1)  and Georgia Southern (7-1, 4-0) met on Thursday night in a battle to decide supremacy in the Sun Belt conference.  Georgia Southern used its triple option offense and suffocating defense to defeat the Mountaineers, 34-14.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

44 Anthony Flory (6’1 230) Appalachian State LB- Senior 

Flory posted 87 tackles in 2017 and is well on his way to matching the total in 2018.

Flory is a sideline-to-sideline linebacker who flows to the football and has the ability to form tackle.   He finished with 10 tackles against the Eagles. The senior linebacker trusted his eyes on numerous occasions and was usually the first to the football despite Georgia Southern cloaking a lot of their runs with misdirection. During a first quarter run by Eagles sophomore quarterback Shai Werts (5’11, 190), Flory not only set the edge and forced Werts to cut back, but he shed his blocker and made the tackle.  Flory should be able to also contribute as an outside linebacker at the next level despite playing as an inside linebacker in college because of his speed, strength and position IQ.  Look for Flory, who was named to the preseason All-Sun Belt first team, to continue to make plays at all sides of the field.

Georgia Southern triple option offense

The Eagles haven’t lost a game in the conference midway through the season and that’s because opposing defenses haven’t been able to solve their option attack.  Georgia Southern ranks fifth in the nation in rushing yards per game, averaging 275 yards.  Werts is the straw that stirs the drink and even if he isn’t running, his ability forces defenses to key in on him. The sophomore quarterback finished with 129 rushing yards and a touchdown on 14 carries. What makes the Eagles attack even more potent is that every once in a while, Werts can make a defense pay through the air. He completed a 57-yard touchdown pass to sophomore receiver Darion Anderson (6’0, 185). It was Werts’ only completion of the night, but on the season, he has completed 57 percent of his passes and hasn’t thrown an interception.  Senior running back Wesley Fields (6’0, 205) adds another punch to the backfield alongside Werts.  He rushed for 98 yards and two touchdowns on Thursday.  One thing for the team to monitor centers around ball security.  Georgia Southern recovered all three of its fumbles against the Mountaineers, but a team that runs as much as they do could be susceptible to fumbles. The Eagles only loss this season came to the second-ranked Clemson Tigers.  If this offense keeps playing this well, they could make a run into the nation’s Top 25. 

Georgia Southern defense

The Eagles defense was fast and played as a unit against Appalachian State.  It’s hard to point out one player, who stood out because so many different players made plays.  14 different players finished with at least two tackles. The Mountaineers scored 38 points and nearly upset Penn State earlier this season but against the Eagles, they couldn’t get anything going after their starting quarterback, sophomore Zac Thomas (6’1, 205), left with a concussion in the first quarter.  Georgia Southern forced four turnovers and didn’t turn the ball over themselves and right now they have a +19 turnover ratio. With a sound defense and a ball-controlling offense, Georgia Southern will be hard to take down in the Sun Belt.

NC State vs. Clemson, 10-20-18: In-game report

 A game that was supposed to feature two Top 25 teams turned into a blowout.  Clemson defeated NC State, 41-7, at home, behind a sensational  performance from their freshman signal-caller. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:      

16 Trevor Lawrence (6’5, 205) Clemson QB-Freshman   

Clemson was forced to use sophomore running back and Heisman hopeful Travis Etienne (5’10, 200) as a decoy against NC State, who decided to make Lawrence beat them with the pass. The freshman quarterback indeed did just that.  Lawrence threw for 308 yards and one touchdown while completing 66 percent of his passes.  Most impressively was his ability to spread the ball around and put it in positions where receivers could run after the catch. The Tigers used a steady diet of comeback routes, which required Lawrence to anticipate when his receivers would break off the top of the route.  When they did, he often  threw an accurate ball to the outside shoulder so that the cornerback couldn’t undercut the route.  13 different Tigers caught at least one pass.  Coming into the game, the question was did the Tigers have enough playmakers on the outside.  After a strong performance against a ranked opponent, those questions will be no more. Lawrence has at least two more years of school, but his patience going through his progressions will keep scouts intrigued going forward.

99 Clelin Ferrell (6’5, 260) Clemson DE- Junior

Ferrell didn’t add to his six-sack season total on Saturday, but he did finish with five

Ferrell posted 18 tackles for loss in 2017.

tackles, including two for loss.  The junior defensive end displayed an ability to get off the ball in a hurry.  On one run in the third quarter, he met the NC State running back in the backfield for a five-yard loss.  Ferrell is a premier pass rusher (21.5 career sacks) who forces quarterbacks to roll opposite of him because he gets up the field so quick. The Richmond, Virginia native is slated to be a top pick in this year’s draft but like any player with his type of speed, he must make sure he keeps gap integrity. On one play in the second quarter, Ferrell got past his man but was too vertical and NC State senior running back Reggie Gallaspy (5’11, 235) blew right past him.  

NC State offense vs. Clemson defense

Williams has been a four-year contributor for the Tigers.

NC State entered the game with a 61-percent conversion rate on third down, which was the highest mark in college football. However, the Wolfpack finished just 2-of-12 on third downs and totaled 297 yards,  nearly 150 less than its season average. Clemson was too much for the Wolfpack on first and second down, which led to 3rd and longs. The Tigers feature two of the best pass rushers in college football with Ferrell and senior defensive end Austin Bryant (6’6, 280). On the back end, the Tigers have the ability to play in press-man or zone.  Both coverages led to interceptions on Sunday, senior linebacker Jalen Williams (5’10, 210) dropped back in a zone coverage to pick off a pass over the middle while earlier in the game junior defensive back K’Von Wallace (6’0, 195) caught a batted pass for an interception as a result of solid man coverage.  The moral of the story is don’t get down early to Clemson, because their defense has the potential to make opposing offenses pay both with talent and scheme.

Georgia vs. LSU, 10-13-18: In-game report

In a SEC contest featuring several NFL Draft prospects, fundamentals were more of a factor than talent. LSU took advantage of Georgia’s poor special teams play, pass blocking and missed tackles, en route to a 36-16 victory.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his thoughts on a few of the teams’ prospects in this in-game report: 

29 Greedy Williams (6’3 184) LSU CB- Sophomore

Williams has the size and elite length that scouts will covet in the NFL Draft. The burning question with players of his size at the cornerback position is their ability to twist their hips and get out of breaks cleanly to mirror receivers. Williams showed no problem with this, see his coverage on Georgia junior wide receiver Riley Ridley (6’2, 200) in the second quarter on 3rd and 9, where he kept up with the receiver stride-for-stride on a comeback route to break up the play.  Williams is also a contributor on special teams as he is tasked with blocking the gunners. The LSU cornerback figures to be a top draft pick and probably will not have to contribute on special teams to make an NFL roster but the more you can do, the better. On the season, Williams has two interceptions. 

40 Devin White (6’1 240) LSU LB-Junior

White’s aggressiveness and willingness to fly to the football is apparent.  So often during Saturday’s game, White could be seen trailing the play to assist a fellow defensive player in finishing it. He finished with a season-high 12 assisted tackles against Georgia. White has the tendency to run himself out of plays and versus play action because of his aggressiveness.  However, his ability to tackle, drop in coverage and matchup with tight ends occasionally, will make him a contributor at the next level. 

18 Isaac Nauta (6’4 240) Georgia TE-Junior 

The tight end position is so much about size in the NFL and Nauta has NFL size. The Georgia tight end showed his athleticism and reflexes when he twisted and contorted his body to catch a back shoulder pass while being blanketed by Devin White.  Nauta can also serve as a hand in the ground blocker and is physically mature enough to take on outside linebackers in run blocking schemes. Nauta will have to show scouts that he can match his production with his size. The junior tight end currently has 13 catches for 176 yards and one touchdown this season.

 

18 Deandre Baker (5’11 185) Georgia CB-Senior 

The Miami native may not be as tall as Greedy Williams. but is the same type of blanket cover corner and has just as much length.  Baker also has two interceptions on the season. LSU didn’t test him much on the outside because they had far greater success running the ball between the tackles.  Baker is consistent as they come at the cornerback position and is near the top of his class at the position. 

Arizona State vs. Colorado, 10-6-18: In-game report

Last Saturday’s Pac-12 matchup featured two teams with playmaking wide receivers, but one team’s work in the trenches decided the outcome.  Colorado (5-1) defeated Arizona State (3-3), 28-21, behind a seven-play, 80-yard drive in the third quarter, where the Buffaloes offensive line dominated the Sun Devils defense. Head coach Mike MacIntyre (pictured above) has his team playing at a high level in the middle of the year.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

Colorado offensive line 

The Buffaloes offensive line has powered Colorado to an undefeated start to the season. The Buffaloes front five has been able to keep junior quarterback Steven Montez (6’5, 235) clean and has opened lanes for senior running back Travon McMillian (6’0, 210). The Buffaloes are one of only three FBS teams to have a player in the top 20 in rushing yards, passing yards and receiving yards per game. Colorado’s offensive line held the Sun Devils to three tackles for loss and zero sacks.  It must have impressed Montez, who invited his entire line to the postgame press conference. The group is headlined by senior right tackle Josh Kaiser (6’6, 300), who has the ability to play both tackle positions. 

1 N’Keal Harry (6’4, 214) Arizona State WR-Junior 

Harry is a big-bodied wide receiver, who knows how to use his size against smaller cornerbacks.  The junior has a knack for seemingly being unfazed when catching the ball in traffic.  Harry also has a shiftiness to his game that allows him to serve as a punt returner for the Sun Devils.  The projected Day 1 wide receiver in the 2019 NFL Draft suffered a thigh injury as a result of taking a big hit on a punt return.  The injury forced him to miss most of the second half.  For the game, he finished with three catches for 62 yards.  On the season, Harry has 34 catches for 481 yards and five touchdowns. 

2 Laviska Shenault, Jr. (6’2 220) Colorado WR- Sophomore 

Shenault Jr. does a little bit of everything offensively for the Buffaloes.  The wide receiver lined up in the slot, on the outside and took direct snaps out of the Wildcat formation against the Sun Devils.  Not  many players in college football  move with the fluidity of Shenault, Jr.   The sophomore wideout accounted for all four of the Buffaloes touchdowns on Saturday, scoring two as a wide receiver lined up out wide and two from the Wildcat position. Through more than a quarter of the season, Shenault Jr. should be considered as a Heisman candidate. The DeSoto, Texas, native has 51 receptions for 708 yards and has scored six receiving touchdowns.  He’s added four more rushing scores on the ground. 

Central Michigan vs. Michigan State, 9-29-18: In-game report

An in-state rivalry pitted the Big Ten against the MAC. Michigan State used a stifling run defense to defeat Central Michigan, 31-20.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

48 Kenny Willekes (6’4 249) Michigan State DE- Junior

Willekes is the most impactful player on the Spartans defense through four games this season.  The junior defensive end added another sack on Saturday to set his total at four for the season. Willekes showed a strong bull rush against Central Michigan and used a rip move to get upfield and force a sack to end the first half. The Rockford, Michigan native anchors a defense that has held opponents to under 70 rushing yards in each game this season. If there is one weakness in Willekes game it’s his lateral quickness.  The junior got caught lost in space when a toss came his way and he couldn’t get outside quick enough to turn the run back inside. The former walk-on should continue to be a factor in the Big Ten and has a game reminiscent of ex-Spartan and former San Francisco 49er Marcus Rush. 

3 Sean Bunting (6’1 181) Central Michigan CB- Junior

Bunting rose to the challenge of blanketing the Spartans best wide receiver, Felton Davis (6’4, 200), on Saturday.  Despite giving up a few inches, Bunting was able to get in Davis’ chest with a quick punch to get the receiver off of his routes.  Bunting used the press coverage to his advantage to pick off a pass in the red zone. The interception was Bunting’s eighth in his career.  Michigan State managed just 185 passing yards and Bunting was a huge reason why.  Look for the junior to continue to add to his already impressive resume’. 

14 Brian Lewerke (6’3 220) Michigan State QB- Junior

Head coach Mark Dantonio  is no stranger to coaching NFL-caliber quarterbacks: Nick Foles, Brian Hoyer, Kirk Cousins and Connor Cook have all spent time in the NFL after their years in East Lansing. Lewerke has the potential to add himself to the list and is the most athletic of the bunch.  The junior quarterback used his legs to rush for two touchdowns against the Chippewas.   After sitting in the pocket, Lewerke turned his back to the pass rush and scored a touchdown to give MSU a 14-3 lead.  The physical tools are all there for Lewerke but you would like to see the junior quarterback cut down on the turnovers.  The Phoenix native threw an interception to the aforementioned Bunting, which he could have thrown away instead of forcing it to Davis, who after being jammed at the line ran a slant that allowed the cornerback to come underneath the route. For the season, Lewerke has thrown five touchdowns and five interceptions.  As the Spartans deal with injuries at their skill positions and along the offensive line, more will be asked of the junior quarterback in terms of decision-making.