Category Archives: NFC

2020 NFL Draft recap: NFC East

Dallas Cowboys Notable picks: With the deflection of former starter Byron Jones, the team went with a player who contains similar length in Diggs. He is certainly more of a ballhawk, but can he provide the consistency in coverage that Jones gave them over a two-year period. It will be worth monitoring the development of Robinson II. His profile may actually be closer to Jones’ than Diggs.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (17) CeeDee Lamb6’2 198
WR-Oklahoma
11/1st Round Lamb has all of the requisite tools to win with both savvy and quickness as a route runner. He has a solid set of tools to be a complement within the Dallas passing game initially. We expect him to see some time in the slot.
2 (51) Trevon Diggs6’1 205
CB-Alabama
84/2nd Round Diggs brings more than NFL bloodlines to the table. He is aggressive getting his hands on WRs at the line of scrimmage. Finding a balance in that aggression and bringing it to run support will ramp up his development.
3 (82) Neville Gallimore6’2 304 DT-Oklahoma143/3rd Round Gallimore had some issues with balance in school and that is probably why he lasted until this spot in the draft. For a player with his level of quickness and power, it was a bit surprising that he didn’t make more plays in school.
4 (123) Reggie Robinson II6’1 205 CB-Tulsa93/3rd Round Robinson II didn’t get the ink of some of the other big CBs in this year’s draft and maybe that should not come as a surprise. He has always been competitive in coverage and finished better in 2019.
4 (146) Tyler Biadasz6’4 314 OC-Wisconsin59/2nd RoundBiadasz was not a dominator in school but he was assignment-sound. The former prep level baseball player led an offensive line that was ravaged by graduation from 2018 and did so admirably.
5 (179)Bradlee Anae6’3 257
DE-Utah
100/3rd Round Due to sub-standard edge rusher workout times Anae fell in the draft. This came after a dominant Senior Bowl showing that showcased his feel for getting off the ball.
7 (220)Ben DiNucci6’2 210
QB-James Madison, Pittsburgh
555/7th RoundDiNucci’s moxie may have influenced this selection. The former Pitt Panther quietly was a couple of inches away from leading the Dukes to a national championship in 2019.
Utah’s Bradlee Anae (No. 6 pictured) forces a fumble versus Northwestern running back Isaiah Bowser (No. 25 picutred) in the fourth quarter. He finished 2018 with 51 tackles, eight quarterback sacks, 15.5 tackles for losses, two forced fumbles and three pass break-ups. The Cowboys selected Anae in the fifth round of the 2020 NFL Draft (179th overall).
New York Giants Notable pick: The team would be satisfied if Holmes can come in and lock down a nickel role within their scheme. The team has quietly assembled enough size on the edges, so it will be imperative for him to learn the various roles of an inside position while also contributing on special teams.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (4) Andrew Thomas6’5 317
OT-Georgia
6/1st RoundThomas has the occasional top-heavy look but he remains relatively consistent establishing a lockout on the perimeter. He won’t be able to get by with relatively in the NFL and his overall
2 (40) Xavier McKinney6’0 201
S-Alabama
41/2nd Round McKinney will be able to play a variety of roles for the Giants just like he did with the Crimson Tide. His best characteristic comes from his pre-snap cognitive ability in diagnosing the opposition’s intentions.
3 (71) Matt Peart6’5 312
OT-UConn
72/2nd Round Peart is by no means a finished product, but that doesn’t mean starting is out of the question. He is most comfortable at RT, but he has started on both sides of the OL in school.
4 (110) Darnay Holmes5’10 195
CB-UCLA
112/3rd Round Holmes lack of width (69-inch wingspan) hurt his cause and forced him to fall. Penalties were a bit of an issue in 2019 but he found a way to compete week-to-week.
5 (150) Shane Lemieux6’4 310
OG-Oregon
299/4th Round You will not find many arguments surrounding Lemieux’s work ethic and determination. He was a consistent presence at OG for the Ducks over a four-year period. He finished his career with 52 consecutive starts.
6 (183) Cam Brown6’5 233
LB-Penn State
210/4th Round Brown has been used to run up the seams with TEs, cover down over the slot and off the edge as an occasional rush artist. He seemed to be most comfortable in school filtering back inside from an overhang LB spot.
New York Giants first-round pick Andrew Thomas (No. 71 pictured) started at both right and left tackle for the ‘Dawgs during his three-year stay in Athens.
7 (218)
Carter Coughlin
6’3 236
LB-Minnesota
286/4th Round
Coughlin finished his career with 22 QB sacks and 40 TFLs. When you combine that with his 4.57 speed, then the team may have gotten a core special teams contributor. He starred on the kickoff team way back in 2016 (see Holiday Bowl).
7 (238)
Tremari “T.J.” Brunson
6’1 230
LB-South Carolina
392/5th Round
Brunson may not completely fit the bill in terms of size, but he does play bigger than his measurements. He had some lower body extremity issues in school, but he appeared in 49 games (283 tackles, 21 TFLs).

7 (247)

Chris Williamson
6’0 205
NB/S-Minnesota, Florida
421/5th Round
Williamson was often tasked with covering fast slot WRs one-on-one and held his own. Hand placement is an issue but his work as a blitzer shows promise. The former Florida Gator should compete favorably in training camp.
7 (255)
Tae Crowder
6’3 235 (E)
LB-Georgia
463/6th Round
Crowder showed time-and-time again that he is capable of chasing plays down laterally. He leaves some tackle opportunities on the field because he does not always get his head across the bow of the opponent.
Philadelphia Eagles Notable pick:  Reagor has a role to fill in the team’s offense as the Wild Card type of player. If he can execute a variety of different responsibilities, then the Eagles will be able to use his elusive skill set to maximize one-on-one matchups on a down-to-down basis.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (21) Jalen Reagor5’11 205
All-purpose-TCU
49/2nd Round Reagor simply needs to find his way as a route runner to take advantage of his outstanding physical tools. He runs well after the catch, tracks the ball down the field and makes defenders miss in space.
2 (53)Jalen Hurts6’1 222
QB-Oklahoma, Alabama 
127/3rd Round Hurts earned kudos at both collegiate stops for his leadership, poise and overall strength. It would not be a shock to see him involved in a number of packages as a rookie.
3 (103)Davion Taylor6’0 224
LB-Colorado
225/4th Round The Pac-12 100-meter sprinter runs in the 4.4s, closes ground on routes in front of him and actually finds a way to be active week-to-week. He simply needs more repetitions. We think he has special teams core (all four teams) potential at the next level. The team will likely incorporate him into some of its nickel/dime packages.
4 (127)K’Von Wallace5’11 206 DB-Clemson82/2nd RoundWallace didn’t always finish interception opportunities in school, but he did often put himself into good position in one-on-one situations. His ability to time his entries in the run game was subsidized by consistent one-on-one coverage in the slot.
4 (145)Jack Driscoll6’5 307
OT-Auburn, UMass
221/4th RoundDriscoll continued to get better during school and his footwork was an area of focus. Now he needs to concentrate on gaining more core strength to handle speed-to-power in the NFL. This will be the case at either OG or OT, where he hopes to win a seventh or eighth role in 2020.
5 (168)John Hightower6’1 185
All-purpose-
Boise State
259/4th Round Hightower continued to improve every year in school but finally put it all together in 2019. For a team that went into the draft wanting to add speed at WR, Hightower has some capabilities.
6 (196)Shaun Bradley6’1 235
LB-Temple
196/4th Round Bradley has some footwork issues to clean up at the exchange LB spot. However, he will add plenty of speed to a defense and special teams unit that values quality backups.
6 (200)Quez Watkins6’0 185
WR-Southern Miss
124/3rd RoundSpeed is the name of the game in the pass-happy NFL, and Watkins brings plenty of it to the table. He seemed to build to an even different top gear with the ball in his hands on quick RPO slants and posts. Now he needs to work on getting off of press coverage.
Philadelphia Eagles sixth-round pick Quez Watkins concluded his impressive three-year run at Southern Miss by averaged 18.2 yards per reception as a junior (1,145 yards, 6 TDs).
6 (210)
Prince Tega Wanogho
6’5 308
OT-Auburn
141/3rd Round
Tega Wanogho did not have a chance to show off his impressive tools in the postseason. At this point in the process, the team could afford to take a flyer on a player who may not reach his peak for another three-year period.
7 (233)
Casey Toohill
6’4 250
OLB-Stanford
260/4th Round
Toohill is a fast, athletic long LB with enough speed to play multiple spots. Coverage is a question mark, as is his ability to transfer speed-to-power as a pass rusher.
Washington Redskins Notable pick: Although the Redskins have a number of different types of receivers on its roster, there is no one other than Cam Sims that contains Gandy-Golden’s size. If he can transition effectively to the NFL, it could open up the team’s Red Zone offense.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (2) Chase Young6’5 264
DE-Ohio State
2/1st Round The Redskins are hoping that Young turns into not only a transformational player but that he can also open up possibilities for the talented Montez Sweat and Ryan Kerrigan on the other side. He may see time at DT on third downs.
3 (66)Antonio Gibson6’0 223
All-Purpose-Memphis
25/2nd Round There simply aren’t players with the size/speed quotient that Gibson brings to the table at 228 pounds. It would not be a shock to see the team use im in the backfield as a dot RB, slot WR or even outside receiver. The all-purpose dynamo produced without a lot of touches in school.
4 (108)Saahdiq Charles6’4 303
OT-LSU
189/4th RoundCharles bends, latches and slides effectively. What he hasn’t been able to do is stay on the field. Whether it was a suspension, injury or otherwise, the former Tiger was not dependable week-to-week. Perhaps the NFL opportunity will change his tunes.
4 (142)  Antonio Gandy-Golden6’4 223
WR-Liberty
95/3rd RoundGandy-Golden didn’t necessarily perform as well during the testing portion of the postseason as he did on the field. It will not come as a shock if he develops into the team’s primary Red Zone threat early in his career.
5 (156)Keith Ismael 6’3 309
OC-San Diego State
113/3rd RoundIsmael -a junior-entry- probably would have not gone much higher in next year’s draft and that may have influenced his decision to come out early. His quickness (and experience at three positions) will add another layer to the Redskins running game.
5 (162)Khaleke Hudson5’11 224
S/LB-Michigan
263/4th Round Hudson may have gotten dinged because he doesn’t really have a true position at the next level. At least, not yet. We think he can be a sub-package LB with enough zone capability to cover the flats and beyond.
Washington Redskins fifth-round draft pick Khaleke Hudson blocked five kicks during his career at Michigan.
7 (216)
Kamren Curl
6’1 206
S-Arkansas

150/3rd Round
Curl – a former cornerback- plays faster on the field than he times in T-shirts and shorts. He reacts to what he sees on the football field and plays with anticipation.
7 (226)
James Smith-Williams
6’3 265
DE-NC State
310/5th Round
Smith-Williams was probably as accomplished off the field as he was on it. A subpar senior year caused the workout warrior to slip in the draft, but injuries were probably more of the cause. However, Ron Rivera has had success with these types of DL (see Mario Addison) in the past.

2020 NFL Draft recap: NFC South

Carolina Panthers  Notable pick: Gross-Matos has a chance to benefit from one-on-one opportunities as the Panthers continue to diversify its defensive front. He and 2019 first-round pick Brian Burns could become bookends on the outside edges.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (7) Derrick Brown6’4 326 DT-Auburn10/1st Round Brown won’t necessarily provide an immediate pass rush upgrade over the since-departed Gerald McCoy. He will, however, provide immediate returns as a defender who will require double teams at nearly 330 pounds. His range belies that of a player in his weight class.
2 (38) Yetur Gross-MatosDE-Penn State14/2nd RoundGross-Matos is young and probably hasn’t come close to tapping his unlimited potential. For him to do, he has to improve affecting the three-step passing game once his pass rush has been stymied.
2 (64) Jeremy Chinn6’3 221
DB-Southern Illinois
39/2nd RoundChinn moved around in school but his value can come as a multi-purpose safety. He has the skills to cover tight ends. His most impressive characteristic is the ability to close from the inside-out on out-breaking patterns. At 221 pounds, he has to get better at not settling his feet in one-on-one coverage.
4 (113)Troy Pride, Jr.6’2 202
CB-Notre Dame
201/4th RoundPride closes routes from the outside-in, runs extremely well and is frequently in good position. The next step involves finishing in those moments.
5 (152)Kenny Robinson6’2 202
S-West Virginia
N/ARobinson is another safety with special teams value and above average range. His biggest knock at West Virginia was the occasional missed one-on-one tackle, something he largely improved as a St. Louis Battlehawk in the XFL.

6 (184)
Brayvion Roy
6’1 333
DT-Baylor
241/4th Round
Roy was often lauded by the Baylor coaching staff (now in Carolina) for his pure power. The former Bear is tough to move but his lack of length caused him to fall to Day 3 of the draft process.
7 (221)
Stantley Thomas-Oliver III
6’0 192
CB-FIU
167/3rd Round
We think Thomas-Oliver III has an outside shot of making the team because of his upside in man coverage. The former WR caught 35 passes for 486 yards in 2016 for FIU.
Atlanta Falcons  Notable picks: For the Falcons to spend a seventh-round pick on Hofrichter underscores the importance of the kicking game. Hofrichter’s strong leg can travel outside, but he tallied 72 punts of 50-plus yards in school. Can he handle kickoff duties?
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (16) A.J. Terrell 6’1 195
CB-Clemson
34/2nd Round Terrell made his mark at Clemson by playing a large majority of man coverage. Although he gave up some plays, his short memory makes him a fit at the position.
2 (47) Marlon Davidson6’3 303
DT-Auburn
40/2nd Round Davidson can basically play any of the four defensive line spots but may project as a legitimate three-technique on third downs. His work off the edge has been very good in the run game and pedestrian as a pass rusher.
3 (78) Matt Hennessy6’4 302
OC-Temple
52/2nd Round Hennessy has outstanding lateral agility, average pop and good range. This is a pick for the near future with Alex Mack still in the fold at center. It may give time for Hennessy to get stronger and provide depth at the three interior line spots.
4 (119) Mykal Walker6’3 230
OLB-Fresno State
3rd Round Walker’s work in school was often as a Rush OLB, but he will get the opportunity to develop as an exchange LB with the hope that he can provide immediate special teams coverage value. His work in the postseason at the exchange LB spot improved his draft stock.
4 (134)Jaylinn Hawkins6’2 208
S-Cal
4th Round Hawkins -a former WR- continued to improve filling as a tackler (see vs. Kelley, UCLA ’19). The ball skills show up in some downfield moments, but his angles have been inconsistent.
Atlanta Falcons first-round pick A.J. Terrell (No. 8 pictured) was frequently given man-to-man assignments in Clemson’s defense.
7 (228)
Sterling Hofrichter
5’10 196
P-Syracuse
462/6th Round
After the Falcons released longtime punter Matt Bosher during the offseason, there was an opening for a punter/kickoff specialist. Hofrichter did both well during his stay at Syracuse.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers  Notable pick: Vaughn’s impact at Vanderbilt goes beyond the numbers. His contact balance, receiving skills and underrated long speed could be the jolt the Buccaneers need in the running game.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (13) Tristan Wirfs6’5 320
OT-Iowa
8/1st RoundWirfs has All-Pro potential as an OG or OT, but most likely projects on the edges. He was more dominant a run blocker than pass protector.
2 (45) Antoine Winfield, Jr.5’9 203
S-Minnesota
19/2nd Round Winfield, Jr. was a solid nickel back earlier in his career, but injuries stopped his charge. He put it all together as a safety in 2019 and -if healthy- the best may be yet to come. He is entering a young, crowded defensive backfield that will benefit from his competitive nature.
3 (76) Ke’Shawn
Vaughn
5’10 214
RB-Vanderbilt
65/2nd Round Vaughn’s productivity (back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons), quickness, field speed and balance were undone by nagging injury problems. He played his best against the best competition in school.
5 (161)Tyler Johnson6’1 206
WR-Minnesota
156/4th Round Johnson finished his storied career with 33 receiving TDs. There are questions about his short-striding nature and ball security, but none concerning strength.
6 (194)  Khalil Davis6’1 308
DT-Nebraska
144/3rd RoundDavis played some at DE and DT in school, but his natural NFL position will be inside. The all-conference track & field thrower’s 4.79 speed didn’t consistently show up down-to-down, but he impressed the last two seasons.
7 (241)Chappelle Russell6’2 236
LB-Temple 
296/4th Round Russell’s movement and play speed in 2019 made it seem as if his knee injuries were a thing of the past.
7 (245)Raymond CalaisAll-purpose/Louisiana-Lafayette370/5th Round In 49 career games, Calais averaged nearly eight yards per carry. In addition, he was one of the draft ‘s
Tampa Bay Buccaneers first-round pick Tristan Wirfs posted the second-best all-time mark in the state of Iowa in the shot put (66-3 1/4).
New Orleans Saints  Notable Pick: Trautman has a chance to develop into a very good NFL tight end. He runs routes like a wide receiver and offers flex potential. He may have an opportunity to steal repetitions from incumbent No. 2 tight end Josh Hill.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (24) Cesar Ruiz 6’3 307
OC-Michigan
31/2nd Round Ruiz has all of the requisite tools to get to and complete most of his assignments. He has to finish blocks with more tenacity in order to become the player the team envisions.
3 (74)Zack Baun6’3 238
LB-Wisconsin
16/2nd Round Baun was often lauded as one of the Big Ten’s best pass rushers over the last two seasons, but the former Badger also found time to pick off two passes (TD) and showed upside in pass coverage.
3 (105)Adam Trautman 6’5 255
TE-Dayton
128/3rd Round Trautman’s 6.78 3-cone time at the 2020 NFL Combine ranked as one of the more impressive testing numbers during the postseason.
4 (120) Tommy Stevens 6’4 237
QB/All-purpose-Mississippi State
430/5th Round If Saints fans want to envision a possible role for Stevens, look no further than how former Penn State OC and Mississippi State HC Joe Moorhead used him as a Nittany Lion. It could be his path to making the roster. He averaged 6.7 yards per carry with 8 TDs in a slash-type role in Happy Valley.
New Orleans Saints third-round pick Adam Trautman, pictured, averaged a touchdown catch every 5.74 receptions in school.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers DB Antoine Winfield, Jr: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 45th overall

After two back-to-back seasons thwarted by injury, Winfield, Jr. bounced back to earn the 2019 Big Ten’s Woodson-Tatum Defensive Back of the Year Award. His seven interceptions were the fourth-best total in the nation and led the Big Ten. The former Golden Gopher defender was a big part of the team’s 11-win campaign. He joins a young, athletic secondary in Tampa.

Q&A with Chicago Bears DE Trevis Gipson: “Put in the work”

Tulsa defensive end Trevis Gipson totaled 13 quarterback sacks in college and in 2019 doubled his sack production from four to eight. DraftNasty’s Corey Chavous caught up with Gipson (6’3, 259) during the 2020 Senior Bowl media day to discuss his favorite pass rush moves and the chances of improving his draft stock.

Chavous: You worked so much at the four-technique (DL) and oftentimes you play bigger than your size, what do you feel like this week offers in terms of showing you can be as an edge rusher?
Gipson: I feel like that will show my versatility to scouts and general managers that will be observing our practice. Like you said, I came in sometimes four-I (inside shade of tackle), four (head-up versus offensive tackle) or sometimes even five (outside shoulder of offensive tackle), but just being on that edge showing I can bull rush or speed rush, speed-to-power, just showing a lot of versatility in my pass rush. I feel like that will help my overall draft stock at the end of the day.

Gipson finished his Golden Hurricane career with 25.5 tackles for losses and eight forced fumbles.

Chavous: Some of our notes on you include the right-hand post from the left defensive end spot and then using that same arm to dip and make the 90-degree turn against Cincinnati this year. When you go against bigger tackles, like the guys you’ll face this week, do you feel like your long arms will allow you to get some extension away from these big tackles?
Gipson: I feel like it will. I have certain moves for certain tackles. Taller tackles I like to dip the corner or use my speed because they are longer than me. It all depends on what type of tackle I’m going against and just being able to turn that corner…wearing that down. That will open my opportunities to do the bull rush or power pass rushes overall.

Chavous: Do you think if you show here what you showed against other Power 5 teams that you could move up into the first round discussion?
Gipson: Most definitely, my confidence in myself is out of this roof. I feel like once I show them my pass rush is unstoppable in my opinion then it will help my draft stock. Overall, run-stopping, also, I feel like that will help me. Just dominating in all aspects man, that’s a part of my game plan. Of course everyone wants their draft stock to rise, but you’ve got put in the work to do it. That’s my first milestone and I’ll cross that coming this afternoon (here at the Senior Bowl).

Chavous: You kind of touched upon it, you’re a good run defender. That separates you from potentially some of the other players. Why is it such a commitment to you in terms of holding the point or being able to two-gap?
Gipson: In order to get to third down, you have to stop first and second.

Chavous: Yeah.
Gipson: I feel like I have more fun rushing the passer but I can’t do that unless I stop the run first. Of course delivering big hits….just enjoying the physicality of the game, that’s part of the reason I do it man. I love the game. You can’t take physicality or you can’t take running away from the game. Everybody is gonna run the ball. Some teams more than others…like Navy.

Chavous: Right, right.
Gipson: I didn’t get many pass rushes versus them (Navy).

Chavous: Protect your legs….(laughs).
Gipson: Ah man, I had blood coming down my shins and everything. It was crazy man. But stopping the run is a big part of getting to that third down and that’s what comes first. So I take that more serious.

Chavous: You kind of remind me of those guys who are multi-dimensional, like Za’Darius Smith or Preston Smith, the guys that play up in Green Bay. Guys who can play the run and rush the passer. Who do you pattern your game after at the next level? Maybe a guy where you say that kind of reminds me of myself a little bit. I can work on developing some of what he already has in his arsenal.
Gipson: I like to compare myself to Marcus Davenport (New Orleans Saints), he’s 6-foot-7 (6’6″). But just his story, coming out of UTSA, a small school, he was underlooked.

Chavous: He kind of rose up during this week (Senior Bowl) too, right?
Gibson: Yeah, he did and that’s my plan. Seeing him become the 14th overall pick, it just gave me nothing but hope and pride. I’m going to try and kill this week and show scouts what I can do. Overall, perform at a high level.

Chavous: Thanks a lot man, we enjoyed watching you play. Best of luck.
Gibson: Thanks a lot.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers OT Tristan Wirfs: 2020 NFL Draft, 1st Round, 13th overall

The former high school state champion wrestler brings a similar temperament to the football field. Wirfs has started at both tackle spots and earned All-Big Ten honors for the Iowa Hawkeyes as a senior. He contains potential at a minimum of four different offensive line spots but should see time early in his career on the edges.

Atlanta Falcons P Sterling Hofrichter: 2020 NFL Draft, 7th Round, 228th overall

Hofrichter’s strong leg traveled both inside and outside during his career for the Syracuse Orange. He registered 72 punts of 50 yards or more. The AP third-team All-American allowed just 17 yards on 10 punt returns in 2019. Over the course of his stay in school, he improved as a directional punter.

Detroit Lions RB D’Andre Swift: 2020 NFL Draft, 2nd Round, 35th overall

Former Georgia RB D’Andre Swift proved to be quite the all-purpose threat in Athens. The back-to-back 1,000-yard rusher averaged over nine yards per reception on 56 catches the last two seasons. For his career, the Pennsylvania native averaged 6.6 yards per carry with 25 total touchdowns. He should add a different element to the Detroit Lions offensive attack.

Green Bay Packers TE/H-back Josiah Deguara: 2020 NFL Draft, 3rd Round, 94th overall

After catching 114 passes for 24 touchdowns as a prep level star at Folsom High School (Calif.). He slowly settled into a role at Cincinnati over a three-year period, concluding his stay with a career-high seven touchdown receptions in 2019. His versatility bodes well in a possible NFL transition to a full-time H-back position for the Packers.

Green Bay Packers QB Jordan Love: 2020 NFL Draft, 1st Round, 26th overall

Although Love didn’t have a textbook final season, he still ended his career with three bowl game appearances, 69 total touchdowns (60 PASS, 9 RUSH) and a 63-percent winning percentage. The talented former Aggie attacks all levels of the football field.

DraftNasty Rewind: Atlanta Falcons punter Matt Bosher

DraftNasty sat down with former Miami (Fla.) placekicker/punter/kickoff specialist Matt Bosher over nine years ago to talk about his plan for attacking the NFL. At the time, the three-time All-ACC kicker was still figuring out what NFL position he would play full-time.

Matt Bosher, punter, Atlanta Falcons, DraftNasty Magazine
Atlanta Falcons punter Matt Bosher (No. 5 pictured) was on DraftNasty’s radar nearly a decade ago and is still going strong today. The nine-year pro has been among the NFL’s leading punters and kickoff specialists ever since arriving from the ‘U.’

It turns out he has become a pretty good punter/kickoff specialist for the Atlanta Falcons. He has a career 55-percent touchback percentage on kickoffs and has averaged nearly 46 yards (45.7) per punt. Bosher has ranked in the Top Five for punting average five times in his nine-year career. In the process, he has posted an impressive 28 tackles, which was something he discussed in our sit down with the former Hurricane.