Tag Archives: Houston Texans

2019 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: AFC South

Omenihu, the Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year in 2018, has nearly 37-inch arms. He could be a fit in DC Romeo Crennel’s schemes.
Houston Texans Notable picks: Howard and Johnson both ranked in our Top 50 and represent potential starting players in Year 1.  Scharping is as technically advanced as any OL in the draft and Warring could be a factor in two tight end sets.  The signing of Matt Kalil ensures the team goes into training camp with competition at the offensive tackle spot. Of the team’s Day 3 draft picks, Omenihu may be asked to adjust right away from a need perspective. Will Fuller’s injury history could leave the team depending on backups again late in the year.
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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (23) Tytus Howard OT/Alabama State 41/2nd Round The former high school quarterback often talked about the task of gaining weight and has gotten up to the 322-pound range.  His quick-footed nature could become a fit on the right side for the Texans.
2 (54) Lonnie Johnson CB/

Kentucky

47/2nd Round Johnson’s occasional pass interference penalty sometimes comes from not using his length to disrupt the wide receiver’s release.  When he does, it is tough for the wide receiver to get off the line. On the plus side, his tackling technique and hip flexibility make for a unique combination at 6’2, 213 pounds. 
2 (55) Max

Scharping

OT/Northern Illinois 81/2nd Round We talked about how Scharping’s NFL Combine performance alleviated some of the concerns about pure quickness heading into the draft.  The Texans went into this year’s draft hoping to cure some of the ills along its offensive line and this selection continues to work in that direction. 
3 (88) Kahale

Warring

TE/San Diego State 57/2nd Round Warring uses his foot speed to get on top of opponents as a receiver.  He still needs refinement in terms of sustaining blocks, but his best football is ahead of him.
5 (161) Charles Omenihu DE/Texas 122/3rd Round Omenihu’s 36 1/2-inch arms continued to aid him in his development while in school.  The Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year began to display increased pass rush acumen as a senior when it came to counters.  He is a solid run defender and will compete with Carlos Watkins, who has largely been disappointing. 
6 (195) Xavier Crawford CB/Central Michigan, Oregon State 300/4th Round After missing seven games at Oregon State in 2017 due to a back injury, the first-team All-MAC corner defended 13 passes in 2018.  He competes on routes outside the numbers.
7 (220) Cullen Gillaspia FB/Texas A&M N/A Texas A&M’s 12th man was a special teams stalwart and team captain.  The former walk-on posted nine tackles in 2016.
Tell III (No. 7 pictured) impressed NFL personnel at the 2019 NFL Combine with a 42″vertical jump, 11’4″ broad jump, 4.01 20-yard short shuttle and a 6.63-second time in the three-cone drill.
Indianapolis Colts Notable picks: General manager Chris Ballard continues to add positive pieces to one of the better young rosters in the NFL.  Ya-Sin and Banogu have a chance to add an element of speed and toughness that the defense continues to expand.  Okereke and Willis will be special teams contributors in Year 1 with the expectation that they can challenge for bigger roles early.  Tell III may be asked to move to cornerback, where his smooth change of direction could perhaps shine.  Campbell has the speed to stretch defenses vertically to take some of the pressure off of stud WR T.Y. Hilton, but his potential contributions in the kick return game should not be underestimated.  Patterson will compete to backup all three interior line spots.
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‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (34) Rock Ya-Sin CB/Temple, Presbyterian 63/2nd Round The first-team All-AAC selection has a background that includes a stint as an All-Big South corner for the Blue Hose.  Watching him play puts you in the mind frame of viewing a 6-foot-2 corner (he is nearly 6’0) because he plays bigger than even his size would indicate. 
2 (49) Ben Banogu DE-OLB/TCU 44/2nd Round Banogu moved around so much in school and with so much effectiveness, he shouldn’t have been pigeon-holed as a Rush outside linebacker.  His loose nature gives him options, but the team is expected to start him with his hand in the dirt. 
2 (59) Parris Campbell All-Purpose/

Ohio State

39/2nd Round Campbell’s speed was used more going sideways in school, but he did work the middle of the field on deep crossing patterns and square-ins.The team has a number of targets already efficient in those roles, so how he is incorporated will be interesting to observe.  He may be a dynamo as a kickoff returner early.
3 (89) Bobby

Okereke

LB/Stanford 162/3rd Round Okereke’s speed would seem to be a match for the type of scheme the Colts run.  His size/speed/weight ratio is in line with 2018 Defensive Rookie of the Year Darius Leonard and fellow LB Anthony Walker.  He will start off as a special teams contributor.
4 (109)

Acquired from Oakland via Jacksonville

Khari Willis S/Michigan State 87/3rd Round Willis’ high football IQ and overall steady nature earned him praise through the draft process.  His ability to cover tight ends at 213 pounds also adds to his value.  He gives the Colts unique depth at the safety spot.
5 (144)

Acquired from Cleveland via Jacksonville

Marvell Tell III DB/USC 387/5th Round We speculated that a team would look at Tell’s physical profile and project him to cornerback.  He may in fact get an opportunity to show off his cover skills outside in training camp. 
5 (164) EJ Speed LB/Tarleton State N/A Speed overcame some off the field and injury concerns to get into the draft after totaling 106 tackles, 5 QB sacks and 12.5 TFLs in 2018. 
6 (199) Gerri Green OLB/

Mississippi State

210/4th Round Green appeared in 52 games during school and has made starts at both DE and OLB.  He will likely become an exchange linebacker, where he has been pretty good at sliding and shuffling despite weighting in the 250-pound range.  Versatile performer. 
7 (240) Jackson Barton OT/Utah 341/5th Round Barton’s lateral kick-slide won to a spot on many occasions in pass pro.  He is a decent athlete with questionable leverage.  There are possibilities for him to compete with Joe Haeg and Le’Raven Clark for a backup spot outside.
7 (246)

Acquired from Philadelphia via New England

Javon

Patterson

OL/Ole Miss 404/5th Round The former five-star recruit has to overcome small hands that make it difficult to latch.  On the positive side, he is an effective pulling option and cuts off on angles with efficiency as a run blocker.  The fact that he has started at OG and OC could him stick in Indy.

 

Taylor (No. 65 pictured), a former Freshman All-American, made starts at both right tackle and left tackle as a Gator.

 

Jacksonville Jaguars Notable picks: It will be interesting to see DC Todd Wash intends to use Allen.  He got up to around the 262-pound mark prior to the draft, but he has played in the 240-pound range in the past.  He has enough flexibility to be at least serviceable in coverage, but they drafted him to rush the passer.  The selection of Taylor would seem to add positive depth to an offensive line always in search of physical players.  Williams and Armstead will increase the team’s speed on special teams. This was a solid, if unspectacular, draft haul that produced a number of players who fit the personality and make-up of the current roster. 
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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (7) Josh Allen Kentucky 6/1st Round Allen will get an opportunity to build on what was a breakout senior year.  He finished his career with 41 tackles for losses and 11 forced fumbles.  His activity in school was his biggest strength.  Look for the team to make him a wild card type of player tough to identify.
2 (35) Jawaan

Taylor

OT/Florida 7/1st Round There may have been some concerns about Taylor’s health, but he is in line with what the Jaguars want to do when it comes to running the ball.  Taylor has quality footwork that shines when he is in optimum condition.
3 (69) Josh Oliver TE/San Jose State 107/3rd Round Oliver’s foot speed, ball skills and ability to flex add an element perhaps missing from the team’s offense prior to the draft.  He and free agent acquisition Geoff Swaim could potentially form a solid one-two punch at the position. 
3 (98) Quincy Williams LB/Murray State 339/5th Round Quinnen Williams’ older brother found a way to sneak into the third round due to his speed and explosiveness.  The former safety was frequently walked-out in an overhang position for the Racers, and there is work to be done when it comes to key-and-diagnose from the exchange LB spot.
5 (140) Ryquell Armstead RB/Temple 153/3rd Round Armstead’s downhill running style closely mirrors many of the running backs he will compete with for a roster spot.  The difference?  His 4.45 speed overcomes a bit of a rigid nature and he played a few snaps on defense in 2018 for the Owls.
6 (178) Gardner Minshew QB/

Washington State,

ECU

372/5th Round Minshew carries similar traits to current Jaguars backup Cody Kessler when it comes to hand size, height and weight.  He was a bit of a gambler at ECU, but he played at a faster pace under Mike Leach while at Washington State.
7 (235)

Acquired from Oakland via Seattle

Dontavius Russell DT/Auburn 183/3rd Round Russell kind of got lost in the shuffle in what proved to be a deep defensive tackle class. We felt he had underrated strength, particularly when aligned in an inside shade of an offensive guard or center.  If he earns a roster spot, it will be to take some of the snaps off of the team’s starters. 

 

Long (seen scooping the ball versus Utah in the 2017 Heart of Dallas Bowl) was named an AP second-team All-American and the Big 12’s Defensive Player of the Year in 2018. He finished with 111 tackles, 8 QB sacks, 19 TFLs and 4 PBUs.
Tennessee Titans Notable picks: Simmons may not be available for action until 2020, which requires this draft class to drift into somewhat of a wait-and-see proposition.  Brown, however, will have his slot evaluated early on. The same can be said for both Davis and Hooker.  Hooker brings a lot of desirable traits to a defensive backfield full of capable playmakers.  Walker’s inability to perform until late in the process caused him to slide, but he was at his best against the best competition.  There are not many drafts that allow you to draft a conference’s Defensive Player of the Year in the sixth round, but the Titans picked one up from the Big 12 in Long, Jr.
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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (19) Jeffery

Simmons

DT/

Mississippi State

5/1stRound With Brian Orakpo’s retirement, the onus falls on Harold Landry -last year’s second-round pick- to take the next step.  Although Simmons may redshirt in 2019, he could become a Pro Bowler if he can return to full health after suffering an ACL tear while training for pre-draft workouts.
2 (51) A.J. Brown WR/Ole Miss 16/1st Round Brown’s strong run after the catch skills make him a tough tackle for any defensive back at 226 pounds.  He displayed the ability to go outside against Vanderbilt, but he primarily worked from the slot on his Pro Day.
3 (82) Nate Davis OG/

Charlotte

92/3rd Round Despite playing right tackle in 2018, he was outstanding with his quick-set technique as a LG.  We were most impressed with his vision, but he needs work on preventing his frame from getting overextended.  He will compete for the right guard position in training camp.
4 (116) Amani Hooker DB/Iowa 34/2nd Round The Big Ten Defensive Back of the Year may have been hurt by the fact that he covered the slot in school.  He will have to prove that he can get off the hash in coverage, which he has done effectively on occasion.  He is at his best reading and passing off underneath routes.
5 (168)

Acquired from N.Y. Jets via New Orleans

D’Andre Walker OLB/Georgia 85/2nd Round Walker received one of final second round grades and the Titans were able to pick him up in the fifth round.  We liked his ability to work from either a two-point or three-point stance effectively.  This team needed more pass rushers and he can play from either side. 
6 (188)

Acquired from Miami

David Long, Jr. LB/

West Virginia

115/3rd Round Long was nicked for his size and lack of length.  He was also unable to complete a full workout until late in the process.  The Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year routinely attacks the action and consistently trusts what he sees in front of him.  He will have to shine on special teams to earn a roster spot.

 

 

 

Center of attention

Former Mississippi State offensive lineman Elgton Jenkins stood out in college for his versatility. There are not many positions he didn’t have a hand in contributing at for the Bulldogs. As he moves on to the next level, we sat down to talk with him about his flexibility, technique and overall mindset heading into the 2019 NFL Draft.

Q&A with Mississippi State OL Elgton Jenkins

DN: With all of the different positions (LG, LT, RT, OC) you’ve played in school, which one would you say is your favorite? Did you have one that you feel like you’re best at?

Jenkins: I think I’m better at center than all of them. I’ve been playing it for two years and in those two years I’ve been playing it I’ve been more wise to the game… having more knowledge. But I think with any position I play at this point right here, with the knowledge I have for the game, I can dominate and play at a high level.

DN: And speaking of playing at a high level, it seemed like one of the things that you do a really good job of is re-anchoring. Even if somebody may get you for a second, you do a good job of hopping back to sink back in the chair. Do you think your tackle experience helps dealing with guys inside trying to use leverage?

During the 2019 Reese’s Senior Bowl practices Rankin (No. 74 pictured with player grabbing his jersey) demonstrated very good balance and core strength.

Jenkins: I really think it is a mix of athleticism, being strong and being able to bend. That’s what I think it is.

DN: Some of the guys you’ve played with and have moved on, what type of advice have they given to you? Can you draw experience from your teammate being in this same situation, Rankin (Martinas, 3rd Round, 80th overall, 2018 NFL Draft, Houston Texans)? What has Martinas kind of talked to you about?

Jenkins: Man, he just says come to work every day with a business-mind approach. Treat this as your job and things like that. So every day come to work and every year somebody else is trying to come and take your job. You’ve got to be a man, step up and keep your job.

DN: In terms of learning a new offense this year under Joe Moorhead (Mississippi State head coach), what was one of the big things you had to pick up in terms of making a quick transition? Certainly a different style than the previous scheme.

Jenkins: Just the scheme and the offense and things like that. I think I pick up offenses really fast man. It is really just the same thing, you’ve just go to be able to use the verbiage from each offense and you’ll pick it up fast.

DN: Do you feel like it was one game that you would want someone to take a look at, what game would that be?

Jenkins: I feel like you can look at the majority of my games, but a game I’d say probably was Auburn. They’ve got one of the bigger D-tackles and he probably had one tackle that game. Not only me, but my offensive line back at Mississippi State. They had a big part in that. We play as five and then we play as one. Us as a whole O-line had a big part in my success.

DN: Is there one guy at the next level you pattern your game after? Or a guy you’ve looked up to?

Jenkins: When I was playing tackle, I always looked at tackles. Me playing center right now, it’ll probably be somebody like Maurkice (Pouncey, Pittsburgh Steelers) or someone like that.

DN: That’s a pretty good one. Thanks a lot for your time man. Good luck in the draft.

Jenkins: Appreciate it.

Houston Texans vs. New York Jets, 12-15-18: In-game report

The Houston Texans have a chance to clinch a first round bye in the AFC playoffs if they can finish the regular season with two wins after defeating the Jets on Saturday. The Texans, as they have done all season, relied on solid quarterback play, an elite receiver and a ferocious pass rush to defeat the Jets, 29-22.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

DeAndre Hopkins

Football is a simple game when wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins is on your team.  Deshaun Watson and the Texans don’t have to overthink or scheme Hopkins open, as the former Clemson Tiger can go over, around and run past defensive backs.  Hopkins (6’1, 215) has elite timing and jumping ability, which allows him to make catches while draped by cornerbacks, resembling a gymnast more than a football player.  Hopkins has 94 receptions for 1,321 yards and 11 touchdowns on the season.  Even more impressive, 67 of those catches have gone for first downs.  When the league’s best receivers are being discussed, Hopkins name should be at the forefront.  Defensively, anything short of double coverage won’t suffice and at times -as he showed on Saturday- that may not be enough.

Sam Darnold

DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson highlighted Sam Darnold in the preseason against the Redskins and was impressed with his command of the offense.  15 weeks into his rookie season and the same holds true.  Darnold has a good feel for the game for a rookie quarterback, he isn’t afraid to run when nothing is there and did his best work during the two-minute drill before halftime.  The former USC Trojan will have to work on his feet when surrounded by the rush.   If enough pressure gets around him, he exhibited the tendency to float the ball and not get his lower body involved.  This lack of torque in his throws led to balls with less velocity and forced receivers to work back to the ball from their routes (see his two third down throws on the second possession of the game). These tweaks should be correctable.   Along with Cleveland’s Baker Mayfield and Baltimore’s Lamar Jackson, Darnold has showed promise in his first season under center.  Like his fellow draft mates, Darnold must cut down on the turnovers (14 passing touchdowns-to- 15 interceptions on the season.)

Robby Anderson

Robby Anderson (6’3 190) has a similar lanky build as Hopkins but is more of a vertical threat than he is an acrobatic catcher. 

“They’ve got a receiver that probably runs as fast as anybody we’ve played in Anderson,” Texans coach Bill O’Brien said before the matchup. 

As he has gotten comfortable with a rookie quarterback, Anderson has caught 38 passes for 588 yards and five touchdowns. The 25- year old receiver is playing his best football as the season comes to a close, notching 11 catches for 172 yards and two touchdowns over the last two weeks.  He hasn’t had the luxury of steady quarterback play early on in his career but the skills are in place.  As the former Temple Owl grows with Darnold, look for the duo to establish more of a connection in the seasons to come. 

2018 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: AFC South

AFC South

Houston Texans

Akins (No. 88 pictured) averaged 16.1 yards per catch in 2017 for the Knights.

Notable picks: The team expects big returns for Reid in the third round. The Texans pass defense finished 24th in the league a year ago. Rankin may have gone higher if he was an inch taller. Akins and Thomas both address a need for the Texans after the retirement of C.J. Fiedorowicz.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
3 (68) Justin

Reid

S-6’0 207

Stanford 140 (3rd Round) Reid proved capable of playing multiple positions for the Cardinal. In addition, he knew the responsibilities of every position on defense. He has to improve as a one-on-one tackler.
3 (80) Martinas

Rankin

C-6’4 308

Mississippi St. 86 (3rd Round) Rankin earned significant time at the left tackle spot in school and there is a possibility that his patient approach can succeed at an interior line spot.
3 (98) Jordan

Akins

TE-6’4 249

UCF 216 (4th Round) Akins has the foot speed to stretch the seams of the field. In 2015, he was the Knights No. 1 wide receiver before going down to injury. His durability is a concern.
4 (103) KeKe

Coutee

WR-5’10 181

Texas Tech 164 (4th Round) This is a sign to former Ohio State Buckeye Braxton Miller that his time may be up. Coutee will have to play stronger.
6 (177) Duke

Ejiofor

DE-6’4 264

Wake Forest 116 (3rd Round) Ejiofor is a sleek pass rusher with enough flexibility to win from a number of spots. A good bit of his sack production came from the defensive tackle spot.   He has to play bigger.
6 (211) Jordan

Thomas

TE-6’4 269

Mississippi State 356 (5th Round) Despite weighing in the 270-pound range, Thomas started at an outside WR position late in his career. He did not embarrass himself at the WR spot during 2018 East-West Shrine practices.
6 (214) Peter

Kalambayi

OLB-6’3 236

Stanford 214 (4th Round) Kalambayi was dinged by some scouts for his lack of flexibility. Nevertheless, he used his 80-inch wingspan  to post 18 QB sacks in his career.
7 (222) Jermaine

Kelly

CB-6’1 195

San Jose St.,

Washington

488 (6th Round) Kelly –a former Washington Husky- has good field speed. He won quite a bit at the gunner position for the Spartans and improved gradually in 2017 at CB.

 

Indianapolis Colts

Nelson (No. 56 pictured) often wins in the second phase of his run blocks. He posted 36 career starts for the Fighting Irish.

Notable picks: The Colts made sure they didn’t waste time turning in the card for Nelson. The selection of Smith in the second round means the team is serious about beefing up its offensive front. Leonard’s presence adds speed to the league’s 26th-ranked rushing defense.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (6) Quenton

Nelson

OG-6’5 325

Notre Dame 7 (1st Round) Nelson may have been one of the highest ranked players on the Colts board in terms of value and need. He will create movement in the running game.
2 (36) Darius

Leonard

LB-6’2 234

S.C. State 31 (2nd Round) Leonard –a two-time MEAC Defensive Player of the Year- combines a rangy style with plus instincts.
2 (37) Braden

Smith

OG-6’6 315

Auburn 90 (3rd Round) Has the size of an OT and dabbles there on occasion.   Consistent, if unspectacular.
2 (52) Kemoko

Turay

OLB-6’4 252

Rutgers 122 (3rd Round) All the agility is in place.  He has been a terror blocking kicks.  Still rounding out his game as a pass rusher.
2 (64) Trade from Cleveland Tyquan

Lewis

DE-6’3 265

Ohio State 108 (3rd Round) Burly brawler who will win with power and run over offensive linemen. Tone-setter.
4 (103) Nyheim

Hines

RB/KR-5’8 198

NC State 276 (4th Round) Hines will be counted on to provide punch in the kickoff return game.
5 (159) Daurice

Fountain

WR-6’1 210

Northern Iowa 168 (4th Round) In somewhat of an under the radar pick, the Colts stole the MVP of the 2018 East-West Shrine Game.
5 (169) Jordan

Wilkins

RB-6’1 216

Ole Miss 178 (4th Round) Wilkins has a smooth style and plays faster than his 4.71 time at the 2018 NFL Combine suggests. His performance in a blowout vs. Alabama turned heads.
6 (185) Deon

Cain

WR-6’2 202

Clemson 179 (4th Round) Like Fountain, Cain will be asked to stretch the outside lanes of the field with his 4.4 speed. Consistency will be the focus for the junior-entry.
7 (221) Matthew

Adams

LB-6’1 229

Houston 207 (4th Round) Perhaps no player better exemplifies a downhill approach better than Adams. He is faster than quick and needs to improve his flexibility.
7 (235) Zaire

Franklin

LB-6’0 239

Syracuse 153 (3rd Round) Much like Adams (see above), there are questions in coverage. Also like Adams, he loves to run and hit people.

 

Jacksonville Jaguars

Chark averaged 21.9 yards per catch for LSU in 2017.

Notable picks:  Bryan will be a significant rotational piece from Day 1.  Richardson adds a measure of physicality to the team’s downhill run game.  Chark will be asked to take the top off of defenses to open up the middle of the field for Marqise Lee.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Taven

Bryan

DL-6’5 291

Florida 51 (2nd Round) Bryan has a rare combination of strength and speed.   Can he locate the ball with more consistency? Even if he doesn’t, he’ll complement the Jaguars other DL with his activity.
2 (61) DJ

Chark

WR-6’3 199

LSU 70 (3rd Round) The departures of Allen Hurns and Allen Robinson necessitated another move to complement the re-signed Marqise Lee.
3 (93) Ronnie

Harrison

S-6’2 207

Alabama 136 (3rd Round) Harrison brings a load in the back end with his downhill approach. While his ball skills are competent, his angles are hit-or-miss.
4 (129) Will

Richardson

OT-6’5 322

NC State 131 (3rd Round) For a team that values run blocking, there wasn’t a better lineman on the board than the mammoth road-grading Richardson in the fourth round.
6 (203) Tanner

Lee

QB-6’4 218

Nebraska, Tulane 373 (5th Round) Despite an inordinate number of turnovers, Lee still passed for over 3,000 yards and 23 TDs in 2017.
6 (230) Leon

Jacobs

LB-6’3 246

Wisconsin 234 (4th Round) Jacobs never really took off for the Badgers until 2017. He has an impressive combination of 4.48 speed and power (26 reps-225 lbs.) at nearly 250 pounds.
7 (247) Logan

Cooke

P-6’5 228

Mississippi State 558 (6th Round) He proves capable of generating hang times in the 4.6-range while kicking for distance and direction (BYU ’17).

 

Tennessee Titans Notable pick: Falk could challenge incumbent Blaine Gabbert for the backup job behind Marcus Mariota. If so, the team will have two of the Pac-12’s all-time leading touchdown producers.
Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (22) Rashaan

Evans

LB-6’3 232

Alabama 45 (2nd Round) Evans’ work off the edge was nearly as impressive as his underrated contributions on special teams. He may be long enough to man an outside linebacker spot.
2 (41) Harold

Landry

OLB-6’2 252

Boston

College

11 (1st Round) Contains underrated agility and change of direction. Forced 10 fumbles in school.
5 (152) Dane

Cruikshank

DB-6’1 209

Arizona 87 (3rd Round) Cruikshank ventured from the junior college ranks to become one of the draft’s best-kept secrets. His 4.41 speed will be an additive to a defense full of young playmakers.
6 (199) Luke

Falk

QB-6’4 215

Washington

State

141 (3rd Round) The Pac-12’s all-time leading passer threw for 119 touchdowns while completing 68.3% of his passes in college. Will his arm strength translate to the NFL?