Tag Archives: Appalachian State football

2021 NFL Draft Preview: Chazz Surratt 6’2 225 LB- UNC


What makes this player NASTY…(Strengths):
Excellent closing speed. Grades well against read option (App St ’19) and as a QB spy (Syracuse ‘20). Trusts his eyes and gets to the ball in a hurry. Fluid hips. Has the ability to pick up running backs on option routes and/or cover slot receivers in short space (Clemson ’19). Hustles to the football and plays through the whistle. Doesn’t cross his legs on front side run schemes but instead chops his feet so he can play the back side cutback if needed. Special teams contributor. Plays on the kickoff team as well as the field goal block unit. 

Weaknesses: Can be picked up by backs when blitzing (Clemson ’19). Surratt is a converted QB and has limited reps as a linebacker although he did play safety in high school. At times he gets caught in the wrong gap or overpurses. Needs to get more violent with hands in order to get off blocks of bigger players. Played in one game in 2018. One of 13 Tar Heels suspended for selling team issued shoes in 2018 and missed four games (https://www.newsobserver.com/sports/article216175450.html). Missed seven games later that year with a right wrist injury. 

Other Notes: Attended East Lincoln High School (NC.) • Named state Gatorade Player of the Year and broke the state record for career total yards (16,593) • First-Team All-ACC (2019) and runner up for ACC Defensive Player of the Year  • Passed for eight touchdowns, six interceptions and 1352 yards as a QB in two seasons (10 games) • Brother, Sage, plays wide receiver for Wake Forest  • 2017 (9 games): 1342 passing yards, 210 rushing yards, 5 rushing touchdowns,  8 passing touchdowns, 3 interceptions, 58.5 completion percentage • 2019 (13 games): 66 total tackles, 49 assisted tackles, 15 tackles for loss, 6.5 sacks, 1 interception, 1 forced fumble, 1 fumble recovery, 2 pass deflections. 


Time to get NASTY (Our Summary): If you go back and watch the 2019 Clemson tape, Surratt jumps off the screen. Clemson’s offense stresses the eye discipline of opposing linebackers with its formation variety (bunch sets, etc..), which can lead to defenders overthinking and playing a step slow. Surratt didn’t have that problem and arguably played one of his better games. The Tar Heels converted QB will be judged by his ability to learn the intricacies of the position, but in a short time he has shown the raw talent is there.

2020 NFL Draft recap: AFC South

Houston Texans  Notable pick: The team drafted Tytus Howard in the first round a season ago and recently re-signed Laremy Tunsil to an extension. Thus the selection of former UNC OT Charlie Heck means the team is seeking quality depth on the edges. At 6-foot-8, can he provide depth at OG?
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (40) acquired from ArizonaRoss Blacklock6’4 290
DT-TCU
47/2nd Round Blacklock’s quickness and natural agility shined in his 2019 return from injury. The former Big 12 co-Freshman of the Year regained his form and provides the Texans with the ability to play two-to-three different positions down-to-down.
3 (90) Jonathan Greenard
6’3 262 DE-Florida129/3rd Round Greenard (VIDEO) played with his hand in the dirt or from a two-point standup position in school. This fits the scheme-diverse system the Texans employ.
4 (126) Charlie Heck6’7 311
OT-UNC
78/2nd Round Heck (VIDEO) benefited from a solid postseason and strong pre-draft workouts. The big key for Heck will be sitting in the chair.
4 (141) Acquired from Miami John Reid5’10 187
CB-NB-
Penn State
70/2nd round Reid is the latest in the line of Penn State defensive backs to get an opportunity in the NFL. The former four-star recruit from St. Joseph’s Prep School (Pa.) got his hand on 33 passes during his career.
5 (171)  Isaiah Coulter6’2 198
WR-Rhode Island
98/3rd Round Coulter -a junior-entry- improved his draft stock by running in the mid-4.4s at the 2020 NFL Combine. He is fluid in-and-out of routes.
Indianapolis Colts  Notable pick: In our estimation, Blackmon (VIDEO) was the Utes’ top defensive back over the course of the last two seasons. If he can recover adequately from a late season ACL tear, this pick could provide long-term dividends.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (34) from WashingtonMichael Pittman, Jr.6’4 223
WR-USC
74/2nd Round Pittman (VIDEO) has a unique combination of size and physical skills. Quite capable of competing in either the slot or the outside lanes. Over 2,500 receiving yards and 17 tackles on special teams.
2 (41) from ClevelandJonathan Taylor5’11 226
RB-Wisconsin
26/2nd RoundTaylor’s ball security issues have been well-documented but he did improve markedly as a receiver out of the backfield in 2019. One of the more impressive areas of his development was the potential he showed in the screen game.
3 (85) from Detroit through ClevelandJulian Blackmon6’0 187
S-Utah
106/3rd Round Blackmon was an All-Pac-12 caliber cornerback before making a smooth transition to the safety spot. Aside from the late season injury, he needed to do a more consistent job of monitoring his angles off the hash. Overall, a very good prospect.
4 (122) Jacob Eason6’5 229
QB-Washington, Georgia
69/2nd Round Eason’s lukewarm performance during his one year at Washington didn’t do much to extinguish the flames of those who felt he needed another year in school. He did have some success at Georgia. Learning from Philip Rivers could be the recipe for the former five-star recruit.
5 (149)Danny Pinter6’4 302
OG-Ball State
97/3rd Round Pinter played well versus NC State in 2019 and those types of performances went a long way in him getting drafted here. He fits the team’s scheme.
6 (193)Robert Windsor 6’4 290
DT-Penn State
234/4th Round Windsor provides options as a third down pass rusher. If he can clean up some balance issues, he has a chance to make the roster.
6 (211)
Isaiah Rodgers
5’10 175
CB/All-purpose-UMass
269/4th Round
Rodgers ran in the high 4.2-to-low 4.3-range in a virtual Pro Day leading up to the draft. His work on the field reading routes and returning kicks was largely just as impressive. Needs to make weight gains.
6 (212)
Dezmon Patmon
6’4 228
WR-Washington State
184/4th Round
Patmon is a physical wide receiver with a big frame, solid speed and decent quickness off the line of scrimmage. Concentration lapses foiled him at times. 12 career starts.
Former USC WR Michael Pittman was a terror on special teams during his time as a Trojan. In 2019, he caught 111 passes for 1,275 yards and 11 touchdowns.
6 (213)Jordan Glasgow6’0 220 S/LB-Michigan429/5th RoundGlasgow’s value continued to trend in an upward manner for the Wolverines over a two-year period. His ability to blitz is complemented by excellent special teams capability.
Jacksonville Jaguars  Notable pick:  The team is building a diverse set of cornerbacks, many of whom have quality size. Scott (5’9 185) -the team’s fourth-round selection- could provide options as a nickel back due to his willingness to mix it up as a tackler.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (9) C.J. Henderson6’1 204
CB-Florida
9/1st Round Henderson’s ball skills and ability to transition effectively in-and-out of his breaks made him a Top 10 pick. He has true No. 1 cornerback capability for a team that relied on Jalen Ramsey in that role for the better part of three seasons.
1 (20)K’Lavon
Chaisson
6’3 254
DE-LSU
86/2nd Round Injury concerns aside, Chaisson can turn into a surfer off the edge with his bend. He did more than just rush the passer at LSU. Chaisson was at least adequate when dropping into coverage.
2 (42)Laviska Shenault, Jr. 6’1 227
WR-Colorado
87/2nd Round The Jaguars will look for Shenault, Jr. (in-game report, 10-6-18) to fill a number of roles on their football team in 2020. Much like he did at Colorado, expect to see him in the backfield, the slot and on the outside.
3 (73)Davon Hamilton6’4 320
DT-Ohio State
152/3rd RoundHamilton has always shown strength at the point of attack, but he went a long way in 2019 of proving that he can perhaps develop into a competent pass rush artist. The Jaguars continue to diversify its defensive front.
4 (116)
Ben Bartch
6’6 310
OT-St. John’s (MN.)
164/3rd Round
Due to sub-standard length, Bartch will most likely get looks at an inside guard spot. The former tight end provides potential as a sixth or seventh offensive lineman on game day because he is a capable tackle.
4 (137)
Josiah Scott 5’9 185
CB-Michigan State

226/4th Round
Scott’s ability to mirror wide receivers in off-man coverage offset concerns about injury issues that surfaced in each of his first two years on campus. He started all 13 games as a junior.
4 (140)
Shaquille Quarterman6’1 234
LB-Miami (Fla.)
51/2nd Round
Quarterman’s leadership capability has been influenced by mentor and former first-round pick Jon Beason (Panthers, Giants).
5 (157)
Daniel Thomas
5’10 215
S-
Auburn
314/5th Round
Thomas plays with energy and closes ground on the field quickly; particularly when breaking forward on the action. He is strong, explosive and capable of filling a role as an eighth man in the box. Special teams production will determine if he earns a roster spot.
Former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault, Jr. (pictured scoring vs. USC in 2019), rushed for seven touchdowns over the last two seasons. The Jaguars will look to get him involved in a number of ways this fall.
5 (165)
Collin Johnson
6’6 222
WR-Texas
138/3rd Round
To get a receiver with Johnson’s potential in Round 5 is a huge win for the team. If he can avoid the minor injury hiccups that seemed to stop him at times from truly becoming a dominant player, then the former Longhorn has a chance to make the roster. He is going to a team with a relatively deep receiving corps.
6 (189)
Jake Luton
6’6 224
QB-Oregon State, Idaho
232/4th Round
Luton has starting-caliber size, arm strength and toughness. The 2019 Mayo Clinic Comeback Player of the Year narrowly missed leading the Beavers to a bowl berth in 2019.
6 (206)
Tyler Davis
6’4 235
TE-Georgia Tech, UConn
N/A
Davis began his career as a big wide receiver at UConn and displayed excellent Red Zone capability as an outside receiver dating back to 2018 (see ECU ’18). He settled down at Georgia Tech in 2019.
7 (223)
Chris Claybrooks
6’0 176
CB/KR-Memphis
N/A
Despite playing in just nine games this past season, Claybrooks was explosive in the kickoff return game, averaged nearly 31 yards on 11 returns.
Tennessee Titans  Notable pick: Evans’ work ethic should not be dismissed. He shaved nearly a half-second off of his 100-meter time in high school in one year. Not only can he factor in the kickoff return game,
he also is outstanding in the screen game.
Round, Selection,
Player School DN Big Board Rank/ Grade ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (29) Isaiah Wilson6’6 350
OT-Georgia
96/3rd Round Wilson served as perhaps the biggest Wildcat QB in the history of prep level football and once scored three touchdowns in a game. An improving pass blocker, he will provide immediate returns as a run blocker.
2 (61) Kristian Fulton6’0 201
CB-LSU
91/3rd Round Fulton, a physical outside corner, allows the team to experiment with a number of different looks in their nickel/dime packages.
3 (93)Darrynton Evans5’10 203
All-purpose-Appalachian State
173/4th Round Evans could prove to the perfect change-of-pace runner to give Derrick Henry a breather during games. He contributed over 4,600 all-purpose yards in school.
5 (174)Larell Murchison6’2 294
DT-NC State
44/2nd Round If you’re wondering why a player with a higher grade lasts this far, it is simple. Bunch production. Too much of Murchison’s productivity over a two-year period came in spots. His technique will be challenged by the Titans staff and the results could pay huge dividends. Effort is not the issue.
7 (224)Cole McDonald 6’3 215216/4th RoundMcDonald’s inconsistency led to a benching at one point during the year. He has all of the tools a team desires in a backup and his size/athleticism closely mirrors that of Ryan Tannehill when he came out of school.
7 (243)Chris Jackson6’0 185
CB-Marshall
316/5th RoundJackson’s competitiveness ranks at the top of his characteristics board. He contains a short memory after getting beaten. It doesn’t hurt that he got his hands on 52 passes during school (seven interceptions). The two-time Florida state champion hurdler enjoys man coverage.
Tennessee Titans third-round pick Darrynton Evans (No. 19 pictured in the 2016 Raycom Media Camelia Bowl, now wears No. 3) put up 20 repetitions at 225 pounds during the 2020 NFL Combine. He is a relentless worker who finished his career with 34 TDs three different ways (25 RUSH, 6 REC, 3 RET).

Appalachian State vs. Georgia Southern, 10-25-18: In-game report

Appalachian State (5-2, 3-1)  and Georgia Southern (7-1, 4-0) met on Thursday night in a battle to decide supremacy in the Sun Belt conference.  Georgia Southern used its triple option offense and suffocating defense to defeat the Mountaineers, 34-14.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in-game report:

44 Anthony Flory (6’1 230) Appalachian State LB- Senior 

Flory posted 87 tackles in 2017 and is well on his way to matching the total in 2018.

Flory is a sideline-to-sideline linebacker who flows to the football and has the ability to form tackle.   He finished with 10 tackles against the Eagles. The senior linebacker trusted his eyes on numerous occasions and was usually the first to the football despite Georgia Southern cloaking a lot of their runs with misdirection. During a first quarter run by Eagles sophomore quarterback Shai Werts (5’11, 190), Flory not only set the edge and forced Werts to cut back, but he shed his blocker and made the tackle.  Flory should be able to also contribute as an outside linebacker at the next level despite playing as an inside linebacker in college because of his speed, strength and position IQ.  Look for Flory, who was named to the preseason All-Sun Belt first team, to continue to make plays at all sides of the field.

Georgia Southern triple option offense

The Eagles haven’t lost a game in the conference midway through the season and that’s because opposing defenses haven’t been able to solve their option attack.  Georgia Southern ranks fifth in the nation in rushing yards per game, averaging 275 yards.  Werts is the straw that stirs the drink and even if he isn’t running, his ability forces defenses to key in on him. The sophomore quarterback finished with 129 rushing yards and a touchdown on 14 carries. What makes the Eagles attack even more potent is that every once in a while, Werts can make a defense pay through the air. He completed a 57-yard touchdown pass to sophomore receiver Darion Anderson (6’0, 185). It was Werts’ only completion of the night, but on the season, he has completed 57 percent of his passes and hasn’t thrown an interception.  Senior running back Wesley Fields (6’0, 205) adds another punch to the backfield alongside Werts.  He rushed for 98 yards and two touchdowns on Thursday.  One thing for the team to monitor centers around ball security.  Georgia Southern recovered all three of its fumbles against the Mountaineers, but a team that runs as much as they do could be susceptible to fumbles. The Eagles only loss this season came to the second-ranked Clemson Tigers.  If this offense keeps playing this well, they could make a run into the nation’s Top 25. 

Georgia Southern defense

The Eagles defense was fast and played as a unit against Appalachian State.  It’s hard to point out one player, who stood out because so many different players made plays.  14 different players finished with at least two tackles. The Mountaineers scored 38 points and nearly upset Penn State earlier this season but against the Eagles, they couldn’t get anything going after their starting quarterback, sophomore Zac Thomas (6’1, 205), left with a concussion in the first quarter.  Georgia Southern forced four turnovers and didn’t turn the ball over themselves and right now they have a +19 turnover ratio. With a sound defense and a ball-controlling offense, Georgia Southern will be hard to take down in the Sun Belt.