Tag Archives: DraftNasty

DraftNasty spotlights 2019 2nd Annual Silver Bluff HS Youth Football Camp

Silver Bluff High School head football coach De'Angelo Bryant stresses fun, competition, excitement, instruction, leadership and fundamentals in his youth football camps. His second annual camp featured intense campers being led by detailed coaching. DraftNasty went behind the scenes to take an in-depth snapshot.

2018 NBA Draft Recap (w/Trades, Notes)

2018 NBA Draft Trades/Transactions/Notes:

  • Atlanta sends the draft rights of the third overall pick, Luka Doncic, to the Dallas Mavericks for draft rights of the fifth overall pick (Trae Young) and a future draft pick (1st Round pick in 2019)
  • Charlotte agrees to trade the rights of the 11th overall pick, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, to the Los Angeles Clippers for the rights of the 12th overall pick, Miles Bridges, and two future second-round picks
  • Philadelphia trades the rights of 10th overall pick, Mikal Bridges to the Phoenix Suns for the for the rights of the 16th overall pick, Zhaire Smith, and for the Suns 2021 first-round pick (via the Miami Heat)
  • Six of the top 16 draft picks were traded
  • Sacramento traded the 37th pick of the second round, Gary Trent, Jr., to Portland for two future second-round picks
  • Atlanta Hawks traded the draft rights of the 34th overall pick, Devonte Graham to the Charlotte Hornets for two future second-round picks
  • The Orlando Magic traded the rights of the 41st overall pick, Jarred Vanderbilt to the Denver Nuggets for the draft rights of the 43rd overall pick, Justin Jackson, and a future second-round pick
  • Philadelphia 76ers traded the draft rights of the 38th overall pick, Khyri Thomas, to the Detroit Pistons for two future second-round picks
Team 

Round,

Selection

 

Player Position, School ‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1) Phoenix Suns Deandre Ayton 7’1 250 

C-Arizona

The Pac-12 Player of the Year made subtle improvements to his frame over the last year and a half while increasing his level of quickness and rise off the floor. A solid free throw shooter with an adequate face-up jumper, Ayton’s back to the basket game is an added bonus.
1 (2)  

Sacramento Kings

Marvin Bagley III 6’11 234 PF-Duke If he can continue to expand his range, his offensive game may expand to new heights. He’s already a scrappy rebounder with quick hops. Bagley III will get to the free throw line but he has to improve when he gets there (62%). He set an ACC freshman record with 22 double-doubles.
1 (3)  

Atlanta Hawks (Traded to Dallas Mavericks)

Luka Doncic 6’8 230 

G-Real Madrid

Although he’s just 19 years old, Doncic averaged 16 PPG, 4.8 RPG and 4.3 APG for Real Madrid on his way to EuroLeague MVP honors in 2017-18. He will look to become just the second lottery international selection to make an All-Star team.
1 (4)  

Memphis Grizzlies

Jaren Jackson, Jr. 6’11 236 

PF-Michigan State

The Big Ten Freshman of the Year’s NBA bloodlines mesh with major shot blocking ability.   The conference’s Defensive Player of the Year shot over 40-percent from three-point range and led the Big Ten with three blocked shots per game. His ability to defend makes him an attractive option for a team that won just 22 games in 2017-18.
1 (5)  

Dallas Mavericks (traded to Atlanta Hawks)

Trae Young 6’1 178 

PG-Oklahoma

The Big 12 Freshman of the Year has range that extends from Oklahoma all the way to the Dirty South. Though he was not ranked as a consensus Top 20 player in the Class of 2017, he ended up leading the nation in scoring (27.4 PPG) and assists (8.7 APG). Draftnasty's Troy Jefferson predicted Doncic as an option.
1 (6)  

Orlando Magic

Mohamed Bamba 7’0 225 

C-Texas

The former Westtown HS (N.Y.) has gotten plenty of attention for his length, but he is an underrated rebounder with an expanding offensive skill-set. The second-team All-Big 12 selection has wiry strength and a high basketball IQ. He finished second in the nation with 3.7 blocks shots per game.
1 (7) Chicago Bulls Wendell Carter, Jr. 6’10 251 

PF-Duke

The Bulls hit home with All-Rookie selection Lauri Markkanen a year ago and this year went after a player who scored in double figures in 30 contests in 2017-18.   The second-team All-ACC performer has an array of moves around the basket and an instinctive rebounder (9.1).
1 (8)  

Cleveland Cavaliers

Collin 

Sexton

6’1 ½ 183 

PG-Alabama

The Cavaliers immediately increased its team speed with the selection of Sexton. He maintained a 4.0 GPA in school during his lone season on campus and had a knack for the big moment.
1 (9)  

New York Knicks

Kevin Knox 6’9 212 

SF-Kentucky

Knox’s toughness and natural scoring ability will provide a solid complement to Kristpas Porzingas. The first pick of the David Fizdale-era is solid in all facets of his game.
1 (10) 

Philadelphia 76ers (traded the rights of this pick to the Phoenix Suns for the 16th overall pick, Zhaire Smith and the Suns 2021 first-round pick)

Mikal Bridges 6’7 210 

SF-Villanova

The first of the four Wildcats expected to be drafted, Brigdes actually redshirted initially at Villanova. The 76ers needed another shooter with the possible departures of either J.J. Redick or Marco Belinelli, but instead acquired the rights to the Phoenix Suns 16th overall pick, Zhaire Smith. DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson predicted Smith could end up with the 76ers.
1 (11)  

Charlotte Hornets (pick made for the Los Angeles Clippers)

Shai 

Gilgeous-

Alexander

6’6 180 

PG-Kentucky

The 2017-18 second-team All-SEC selection recorded the third most assists for a freshman in the history of Kentucky basketball. Blessed with the ability to defend three-to-four positions, he will increase the flexibility for Doc Rivers’ defensive unit. He shot 81.7-percent from the free throw line as a freshman.
1 (12)  

Los Angeles Clippers (pick made for the Charlotte Hornets)

Miles Bridges 6’6 220 

SF-Michigan

State

Despite being 6-foot-6, he still averaged seven rebounds per game in 2017-18. Why? He has a strong, burly frame. The former Big Ten Freshman of the Year is a true high riser.
1 (13)  

Los Angeles Clippers

Jerome 

Robinson

6’5 188 

SG-Boston College

Robinson becomes the first ever Eagles player to become a lottery selection and was a runner-up to Marvin Bagley III for ACC Player of the Year. He shot over 83% from the free throw line
1 (14) 

Denver Nuggets

Michael Porter, Jr. 6’10 211 

SF-Missouri

Porter, Jr. snuck into the final lottery selection and provides the wing depth that the Nuggets desperately need. Despite playing just three games for Missouri in 2017-18 due to back surgery, the former Gatorade Player of the Year has immense upside.
1 (15)  

Washington Wizards

Troy Brown 6’6 ¾ 208 

SF-Oregon

The Wizards are still in need of athletic big men, but they also needed someone who could matchup with opposing guards and forwards defensively. To that end, Brown fits the bill. His versatility included guard duties at the prep level.
1 (16) Phoenix Suns (traded this pick for to the Philadelphia 76ers and its 2021 1st round pick for the rights to the 76ers 10th overall pick Mikal Bridges-see below) Zhaire Smith 6’4 198 

G-F/Texas Tech

After securing Ayton with the first overall pick, the Suns turned their attention to another guard for depth with the possible departure of free agent Elfrid Payton.   This pick was made for the 76ers in a trade that sent their 10th overall pick to the Suns in exchange for Smith’s rights. Smith’s outstanding leaping ability (41 ½” VJ) and floor speed will add an explosive element to the 76ers backcourt. Bridges expands the Suns’ defensive versatility.
1 (17) Milwaukee Bucks Donte DiVincenzo 6’4 ½ 200 

SG-Villanova

The Bucks needed more scorers on the perimeter after finishing 13th in the NBA playoffs in three-pointers. DiVincenzo opened even more eyes at the NBA Combine after earning Most Outstanding Player honors in the 2018 NCAA Final Four. The Big East’s Six Man of the Year shot 40% from three-point range this past season.
1 (18)  

San Antonio Spurs

Lonnie Walker IV 6’4 196 

SG-Miami (Fla.)

Athletic shooting guards/wings were a possibility for the Spurs with the unenviable Kawhi Leonard situation. The team opted for a player who can play the two-guard or wing in Walker IV. He has to stay healthy and become more productive with the ball in his hands. His play strength is undeniable.
1 (19)  

Atlanta Hawks

Kevin Huerter 6’7 194 

SG-Maryland

Huerter led the Terrapins with 73 three-pointers in 2017-18. The shooting guard spot was a position the Hawks needed to target to go along with Kent Bazemore.
1 (20)  

Minnesota Timberwolves

Josh Okogie 6’4 ½ 210 SG-Georgia Tech The third-team All-ACC selection is a high-riser who averaged over 18 points per game for the Yellow Jackets. With Jerome Robinson off the board, Okogie was one of the better shooting guards still available for the Timberwolves.
1 (21) Utah Jazz Grayson Allen 6’4 ½ 198 

SG-Duke

The former Blue Devil fills a need for the team despite being somewhat of a surprise in this slot. He nearly put up 2,000 points in his career (1,996), but there are some questions about his ability to defend consistently. There are, however, few questions surrounding his competitiveness and athleticism.
1 (22) Chicago Bulls Chandler Hutchison 6’7 197 

SG-Boise State

We felt the MWC Player of the Year could have been a possibility for the Spurs, but we also felt that the Bulls needed a guard with both Zach LaVine and David Nwaba currently free agents.   Will Hutchison continue to expand his range?
1 (23) Indiana Pacers Aaron Holiday 6’1 187 

PG-UCLA

Blessed with NBA bloodlines (Brother, Jrue, plays for the New Orleans Pelicans and another brother, Justin, plays for the Chicago Bulls), this Holiday rarely took any days off for the Bruins. He led the Pac-12 in scoring in 2017-18 (20.3 PPG). The Pacers simply took the best player available at this stage of the draft.
1 (24)  

Portland Trail Blazers

Anfernee Simons 6’3 183 

SG-United States

With Shabazz Napier and Pat Connaughton both free agents, guard depth was important for the Trail Blazers. The former IMG Academy standout moves well without the basketball and finishes in transition.
1 (25)  

Los Angeles Lakers

(from the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2017-18 trade that included Isaiah Thomas and Jordan Clarkson)

Moritz Wagner 6’11 241 

PF-Michigan

There are few questions regarding Wagner’s ability to stretch the floor as a shooter.   The former Wolverine has good vision, works as a rebounder and possesses above average ability to execute in pick-and-pop situations.
1 (26)  

Philadelphia 76ers

Landry Shamet 6’5” 188 

PG-Wichita State

We talked about Shamet’s ability to extend the defense in our Detroit Pistons team needs. Shamet, a combo-type, is insurance if the team loses either Redick or Belinelli in free agency.
1 (27) Boston Celtics Robert Williams III 6’10” 241 

C-Texas A&M

Williams III is one of the better shot blockers in the draft and he led the SEC in rebounding.   The team will look for him to be a rim-runner and lob specialist. It was a bit of a surprise he lasted until the end of the first round.
1 (28) Golden State Warriors Jacob Evans 6’5” 199 

SG-Cincinnati

The first-team All-AAC performer is a stout defender and underrated passer. The Warriors continue to add players who can guard multiple positions.
1 (29) Brooklyn Nets Dzanan Musa 6’9” 195 

SF-

Bosnia-

Herzegovina

Whether or not the team gets Charlotte C Dwight Howard in its proposed trade is still up for discussion. In the meantime, they needed a player capable of handling defensive responsibilities next to either Howard or Timofey Mozgov. Musa may not be a fit for those duties, but he averaged 12.4 PPG and was named the All-Adriatic League’s top prospect of the year.
1 (30) Atlanta Hawks Omari Spellman 6’9” 253 

PF-Villanova

While Spellman averaged just under 11 points per game for the Wildcats, he did shoot 43-percent from three-point range. Aside from his ability to shoot, he has enough bulk to compete as an offensive rebounder.
2nd Round      
2 (31) Phoenix Suns Elie Okobo 6’3” 180 

PG-France

The Suns didn’t get their backup guard early but they do get a player who has some similarities to the aforementioned Payton (a free agent). He has more shooting ability at this same stage of his development.
2 (32) Memphis Grizzlies Jevon Carter 6’1 ½” 196 

PG-West Virginia

Carter’s development as a scorer complements what may be the best defensive skill-set in the draft. He was twice named the Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year and became just the fifth player in Division I history with 1,500 points, 500 rebounds, 500 assists and 300 steals.
2 (33)  

Dallas Mavericks

Jalen Brunson 6’2 ¼” 198 

PG-Villanova

Although he shot 41-percent from three-point range in 2017-18, some of Brunson’s best work came on the low block. His foot speed is a question mark.
2 (34)  

Atlanta Hawks

Devonte Graham 6’1 ½” 188 

PG-Kansas

Graham has the ability to go either right or left off the dribble to get separation for his pull-up jumpers. The Hawks continue to add playmakers to compete in the backcourt.
2 (35)  

Orlando Magic

Melvin Frazier 6’6” 198 

SF-Tulane

The AAC’s Most Improved Player led the conference in steals (2.2 per gm). He put together an outstanding NBA Combine performance.
2 (36)  

New York Knicks

Mitchell Robinson 6’11” 215 

PF-United States

One of the nation’s top recruits in 2017, Robinson never played college basketball and elected to train for the draft.
2 (37)  

Sacramento Kings

Gary Trent, Jr. 6’5” 204 

SG-Duke

During the NBA Combine, Trent, Jr. excelled shooting from the top of the key and posted a 39 ½” max VJ. He was one of the Blue Devils most consistent shooters in 2017-18.
2 (38)  

Philadelphia 76ers

Khyri Thomas 6’3 ¾” 198 

SG-Creighton

Known for his defense, Thomas’ 6’10 ½” wingspan gives him plenty of flexibility when it comes to guarding multiple positions. He’s capable of winning of finishing in transition or off the catch-and-shoot on the wings.
2 (39)  

Philadelphia 76ers

Isaac Bonga 6’9 203 

SF-Germany

Although this pick may not provide immediate dividends, Bonga,has good flexibility and impressive court vision.
2 (40)  

Brooklyn Nets

Rodions Kurucs 6’10” 215 

F-Lativa

Kurucs, a member of the 2017-18 Latvian National Team, averaged just over 10 points and nearly 3 RPG for FC Barcelona in 2017-18. He has a game that translates to the type of stretch-fours seen in the NBA today. He will need to work on getting his shot off quicker.
2 (41) Orlando Magic Jarred 

Vanderbilt

6’9” 214 

SF-Kentucky

If not for a left foot injury, Vanderbilt –one of the top players in the Class of 2017- may have made a bigger impact for the Wildcats in 2017-18. Where he did flash was as a rebounder. He averaged 7.9 rebounds per game in 14 games for the team.
2 (42) Detroit Pistons Bruce 

Brown

6’5 194 

SG-Miami (Fla)

Yet another prospect affected by a foot injury in 2017-18, Brown was probably more impactful as a shooter during his freshman season.
2 (43)  

Denver Nuggets

Justin Jackson 6’6 ¾” 229 

SF-Maryland

Jackson was a possible target for the Houston Rockets in our Southwest Division Team Needs. The 6-foot-7 Jackson shot 43-percent from three-point range and contains a 7-foot-2-inch wingspan. He eventually ended up getting traded to the Orlando Magic for the draft rights to Jarred Vanderbilt.
2 (44) Washington Wizards Issuf Sanon 6’4 185 

PG-Ukraine

He’s dealt with minor injuries, but the 2018 Slovenian League Champion logged added minutes for the Petrol Olimpija team of the Premier A SKL league.
2 (45) Brooklyn Nets Hamidou Diallo 6’5 190 

SG-Kentucky

Diallo posted the highest max vertical at the 2018 NBA Combine (44 ½”). If he can develop as a shooter, he has some similarities to Houston Rockets G Gerald Green. Diallo shot just 62% from the free throw line this past season and just 43-percent from the field
2 (46)  

Houston Rockets

De’Anthony Melton 6’3 193 

SG-USC

During his lone season of action at USC (2016-17), he averaged 1.9 steals per game.   Despite shooting 71% from the stripe, he connected on just 28.4% of his three-point shots.
2 (47)  

Los Angeles Lakers

Sviatoslav 

Mykhailiuk

6’8 195 

SG-Kansas

Mykhailiuk shot 44.4% from three-point range for the Jayhawks in 2017-18 while averaging 14.6 points per game. The former Jayhawk has elite shooting abilities that Draftnasty's Troy Jefferson took notice of.
2 (48) 

Minnesota Timberwolves

Keita Bates-Diop 6’8” 223 

SF-Ohio State

Bates-Diop earned second-team All-American honors and was named the Big Ten Player of the Year.   Bates-Diop improved his scoring average by nearly 10 points from 2016-17.
2 (49) 

San Antonio Spurs

Chimezie Metu 6’11 215 

PF-USC

Metu has improved as a free throw shooter since he first arrived on campus. DraftNasty’s Jefferson felt Metu would be a fit for the Pelicans, but he’s going to a team in the division who can use his athleticism and length.
2 (50) 

Indiana Pacers

Alize Johnson 6’8 217 

PF-Missouri State

Johnson doesn’t have noteworthy length (6’8 ¾” wingspan) for his 217-pound frame, but he averaged a double-double (points, rebounds) in back-to-back seasons for the Bears.
2 (51) 

New Orleans Pelicans

Tony Carr 6’4 ½” 198 

SG-Penn State

The first-team All-Big Ten selection finished the season with four games of 30-plus points and shot 43.3% from three-point range. Carr’s 8’4” standing reach makes him bigger than his size would indicate.   He led the Nittany Lions to the 2018 NIT title.
2 (52) Utah Jazz Vincent Edwards 6’8 225 

SF-Purdue

A solid spot-up shooter, Edwards improved his scoring average in each of his four years on campus. An effiicent free throw shooter (82% career), he is also effective beyond the arc.
2 (53)  

Oklahoma City Thunder

Devon Hall 6’5 210 

SG-Virginia

Hall is by no means a high-riser, but he was satisfactory in non-stationary shooting drills at the 2018 NBA Combine. He was an 89% free throw shooter in 2017-18.
2 (54) Dallas Mavericks Shake Milton 6’5 ½ 207 

SG-SMU

In just over 36 minutes per game in 2017-18, Milton averaged 18 points per game. The 6’5 ½” Milton has nearly a 7-foot-1-inch wingspan and 8’3 ½” standing reach.
2 (55)  

Charlotte Hornets

Arnoldas Kulboka SF-Lithuania Despite averaging just over 8 points per game, he shot nearly 37-percent from three-point range. He will likely be a pick for the Hornets down the road
2 (56)  

Philadelphia 76ers

Ray Spalding 6’10 ¼ 215 

PF-Louisville

DraftNasty’s Jefferson projected that Spalding’s 7’6” wingspan would be a fit for the Portland Trail Blazers. Instead, the 76ers get a prospect that averaged 8.7 rebounds and 1.7 blocks for the Cardinals in 2017-18.
2 (57)  

Oklahoma City Thunder

Kevin Hervey 6’7 211 

SF/PF-UT-Arlington

Hervey is yet another player that the Thunder project can improve as a shooter. He’s an underrated rebounder who Jefferson projected would be a possible target for another team in the Northwest Division (Denver Nuggets) as a small forward-type projection.
2 (58)  

Denver Nuggets

Thomas Welsh 7’0 245 

C-UCLA

Welsh, a career 80-percent free throw shooter, shot 40-percent from the three-point line as a senior while averaged 10.8 rebounds per game.
2 (59)  

Phoenix Suns

George 

King

6’6 220 

SF-Colorado

The second-team All-Pac-12 selection nearly hit 200 three-pointers in college (181) and perhaps more impressively 5.4 rebounds per game (career).
2 (60) Philadelphia 76ers Kostas 

Antetokounmpo

6’10 190 

SF-Dayton

The younger brother of the Greek Freak in Milwaukee didn’t log many minutes for Dayton, but he did aveaged over a block per game.   He’s still not a shooter (51.6% free throws), but he contains a 7’2 ¼” wingspan and 9’2” standing reach.

Oklahoma PG Trae Young: DraftNasty’s 2018 NBA Draft preview

DraftNasty went inside the game of former Oklahoma point guard Trae Young during the 2016 Nike Peach Jam. Along with fellow 2018 NBA Draft prospect Michael Porter, Jr., Young helped lead Mokan Elite to the championship. For his efforts, he earned Co-MVP honors with Porter, Jr.  During this past season at Oklahoma, he earned consensus All-American honors after leading the nation in points per game (27.4) and assists per game (8.7). Along the way, he shot 42.3-percent from the field, 36.1-percent from three-point range and 86.1-percent from the free throw line.

2018 NFL Supplemental Draft: Virginia Tech CB Adonis Alexander

36 Adonis Alexander 6’3 207 Virginia Tech CB-Senior

What makes this player NASTY…(Strengths): Confident. Easy mover at his size. Flips his hips for a big man. Has seen time at both CB and safety. Covers ground outside the numbers when aligned in the deep middle one-third post of the field. Contains positive hand-eye coordination. Reacts to tips and overthrows. He is satisfactory in run support on the edge (wrap is inconsistent-see Weaknesses). Long enough to throw around stalk-blocking WRs on the perimeter. Capable of cutting off the outside release in press-man (Jones, ECU ’16). Does a fine job of clueing the QB in his press-bail techniques. Gets his head around in the Red Zone or in the open field when defending fade routes. Dislodges balls when he connects as a hitter (PBU, 4th QTR, WVU ’17). Reacts quickly to the action in front of him. Exhibits plus effort in open field pursuit angles. Used as a jammer on the punt return unit. Has played the R1 position on the kickoff team.

Weaknesses: Shoulder-block tackling shows up on occasion. There are also times when he’s seen dropping his head as a tackler (MT, Jennings, WVU ’17, TD).   Can be a bit elongated breaking down to tackle in space. In his motor-press technique, he gives free access to slant routes (tends to get into a backpedal or opens his hips slightly towards the sidelines). As a bump-and-run CB, he needs to be careful with the second jam because it pushes him out of phase with the WR (TD allowed, ECU ’16). Pass interference penalties have shown up when defending shifty WRs (P.I., Scott, ACC Championship ’16). Loses some WRs in his blind spot when press-bailing. Accountability. Suspended indefinitely for a violation of team rules in April of 2016 (https://virginiatech.sportswar.com/article/2016/07/13/adonis-alexander-houshun-gaines-reinstated-virginia-tech-football-will-miss-least-liberty-game/) and was suspended for the team’s opener vs. Liberty. Did not play vs. ECU in 2017 for not meeting the program’s standards (http://www.roanoke.com/hokies/cb-adonis-alexander-doesn-t-make-trip-to-ecu-for/article_d71afe5a-9a59-11e7-8ac0-4fa778d5ec6f.html). Forced to enter the 2018 supplemental draft after being ruled academically ineligible for the 2018 season (https://sports.yahoo.com/virginia-tech-db-adonis-alexander-ruled-academically-ineligible-214729074.html).

Other Notes:

  • Attended Independence HS (N.C.) and was ranked as one of the Top 30 players in the state by Rivals.com
  • 2015 (7 sts): 55 tackles, ½ TFL, 4 INTs, 6 PBUs
  • 2016 (5 sts): 44 tackles, 2 TFLs, 2 INTs and 7 PBUs
  • 2017 (2 sts): 27 tackles, QB sack, 2 TFLs, FF, INT and 4 PBUs
  • Career Stats: 126 tackles, QB sack, 4.5 TFLs, FF, 7 INTs and 17 PBUs

Time to get NASTY (Our Summary): Alexander contains positive ball skills, outstanding size and above average body control. There are some accountability issues that NFL teams will have to digest, but he has generally been a productive spot starter in school. It is important to remember that Virginia Tech frequently rotated cornerbacks during his time in Blacksburg.  He was often seen sharing time with Washington Redskins 2018 seventh-round selection (241st overall) Greg Stroman.  Along with the accountability issues, the rotation is a big reason the 6-foot-3 cornerback started just 14 games in three years. As a special teams performer, he’s been a significant contributor on the punt return, punt and kickoff units. He’s a more physical version of San Francisco 49ers promising young corner Ahkello Witherspoon. The difference? While clearly a more physical player coming out of school, he lacks Witherspoon’s top-end recovery speed.

DraftNasty’s Grade: 6.0 (3rd Round)

2018 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: NFC East

NFC EAST

 

Dallas Cowboys
Vander Esch hopes to bring championships to the Cowboys over the next few years.

Notable picks: Vander Esch may prove to be the difference-maker that the Cowboys envision with his versatility. Armstrong’s uneven pre-draft workouts are not at all an indication of his on-field burst and athleticism. Williams adds some swing backup insurance and could outplay his original draft position.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (19) Leighton

Vander Esch

6’4 256

Boise State 36 (2nd Round) Athletic former basketball player has to become better in his stack-and-shed. Underrated range in coverage.
2 (50) Connor

Williams

6’5 296

Texas 3 (1st Round) Williams’ injury in 2017 following an inauspicious start to his junior campaign. When he’s on top of his game, the finish is in place.
3 (81) Michael

Gallup

WR-6’1 205

Colorado St. 145 (3rd Round) Gallup wins outside the numbers and plays with a physical style that is even stronger than his sturdy 205-pound nature suggests play-to-play.
3 (82) Tracy

Walker

DB-6’1 195

Louisiana-Lafayette 191 (4th Round) Walker has enough length that he could even get looks at a cornerback spot. A solid tackler, his best football may be ahead of him.
4 (116) Dorance

Armstrong, Jr.

OLB-6’4 257

Kansas 49 (2nd Round) Armstrong, Jr. has an 84-inch wingspan and produced 20 tackles for loss in 2016.
4 (140) Dalton Schultz

TE-6’4 249

Stanford 296 (4th Round) Schultz is an underrated route runner despite producing just 11 third down receptions in school.
5 (171) Mike

White

QB-6’4 223

Western Kentucky 155 (3rd Round) White has all of the tools of an NFL starting quarterback minus the mobility.
6 (208) Cedrick

Wilson

WR-6’3 194

Boise State 78 (3rd Round) Wilson produced like a first-round wideout in the MWC. Will his 4.55 speed translate to the perimeter or will he be relegated to the slot?
7 (236) Bo

Scarbrough

RB-6’1 228

Alabama 308 (5th Round) It may have been a long wait on draft day, but the bruising runner could be a change-of-pace power back if he can contribute on special teams.

 

 

 

New

York

Giants

Hill (No. 98 pictured) ranked as one of DraftNasty's Top 3-4 DEs/DTs available in the 2018 NFL Draft. The former Wolfpack star rushed for over 800 yards and 5 TDs as a senior at the prep level.

Notable picks: Hernandez is a mammoth blocker who wins on man blocks.   If he can win as an angle blocker, it will increase the diversity of the running game.  Hill and McIntosh both will add diversity to a defense that finished 27th against the run in 2017.

Round,

Selection

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (2) Saquon

Barkley

RB-6’0 233

Penn State 2 (1st Round) Barkley’s lateral agility is top-notch. How much will he contribute as a check down threat?   Based on his collegiate film, he should line up at a number of spots.
2 (34) Will

Hernandez

OG-6’2 327

UTEP 21 (2nd Round) A behemoth bar room brawler with mass and underrated quickness, Hernandez has to distribute his weight evenly to reach his immense potential.
3 (66) Lorenzo

Carter

OLB-6’5 250

Georgia 68 (3rd Round) Carter has some similarities to current Carolina Panthers DE Mario Addison. Can he create speed-to-power off the edge?
3 (69) B.J. Hill

DL-6’3 311

NC State 22 (2nd Round) Hill’s dependability is aided by an ability to play a bit longer than his 77-inch wingspan would suggest. Makes plays laterally in the run game.
4 (108) Kyle

Lauletta

QB-6’3 222

Richmond 154 (3rd Round) Lauletta –the 2017 CAA Offensive Player of the Year- maintains good posture in the pocket and excels on the hit-and-throw concepts. Posted a 4.07 time in the 20-yard short shuttle at the NFL Combine.
5 (139) RJ

McIntosh

DT-6’4 286

Miami (Fla.) 161 (3rd Round) McIntosh has the size to play either DE or DT.   His 83-inch wingspan complements a light-footed nature. He needs to anticipate snap counts with more consistency.

 

 

Philadelphia Eagles
Former Pittsburgh cornerback Avonte Maddox (No. 14 pictured) played WR, CB, PR KR and the nickel back spot for the Panthers. He will add versatility to the Super Bowl champions' roster.

Notable pick: Maddox is a player who went undervalued due to size and slight durability concerns. His ability to cover the slot could increase some of the packages by DC Jim Schwartz. Schwartz typically likes to rush with four players and Maddox could increase coverage disguises.  The Eagles got three of our top 60 players with their first three selections.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (49) Dallas

Goedert

6’4 260

South Dakota St. 56 (2nd Round) Goedert gives the Eagles two tight ends who can attack vertically in the seams of the field. And he weighs in the 260-pound range.
4 (125) Avonte

Maddox

CB-5’9 183

Pittsburgh 53 (2nd Round) Maddox’s 4.39 40-yard dash at the Combine was only outdone by his 6.51 time in the 3-cone drill. He’s even better on the field than in T-shirts and shorts.
4 (130) Josh

Sweat

DE-6’5 251

Florida St. 58 (2nd Round) Sweat fell due to lingering question marks about his knee.   When he’s feeling good, he can translate speed-to-power with one-hand posts and collapses the edge vs. tackles.
6 (206) Matthew

Pryor

OT-6’6 343

TCU 375 (5th Round) Pryor sits on run defenders with his mammoth size.   He often wins in the first phase of block. 11 ½-inch hands.
7 (233) Acquired from New England Patriots Jordan

Mailata

OL-6’8 346

Australia Rugby player N/A Mailata never played college football, but he ran in the 5.1-range for NFL scouts.

 

Washington Redskins
Settle (No. 4 pictured) posted 19.5 tackles for losses the last two seasons for the Hokies.

Notable picks: Christian will help alleviate the issues the Redskins had last year when injuries beset the offensive line. Can he swing to the center position to challenge incumbent Chase Roullier?  Settle is a player who was once thought of as a potential second-round pick before an uneven postseason.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (13) De’Ron

Payne

DT-6’2 311

Alabama 30 (2nd Round) Payne will help to control the action as a fire-plugging two-gap specialist and occasional one-gap penetrator. Expect to see him aligned over the center in DC Greg Manusky’s three-man fronts.
2 (59) Derrius

Guice

RB-5’11 224

LSU 24 (2nd Round) Guice will have to balance his bullish running style to avoid the injury scrapes that took away time from him as a junior.
3 (74) Geron

Christian

OT-6’5 298

Louisville 79 (3rd Round) Christian’s versatility in school saw him move around during games. He was seen snapping the ball on his Pro Day and it could be a possible transition to a starting role.
4 (109) Troy

Apke

S-6’1 200

Penn State 147 (3rd Round) Apke didn’t make a number of plays off the hash, but he demonstrated range during the week of the 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and versus Pittsburgh in 2017.
5 (163) Tim

Settle

DT-6’3 329

Virginia Tech 200 (4th Round) Settle’s quickness is aided by power. He will win versus guards or centers and could be a rotational piece on first and second down.
6 (197) Shaun

Dion Hamilton

LB-6’0 228

Alabama 231 (4th Round) Crimson Tide team captain has battled major lower extremity injuries, but he can locate, identify and close once he’s made his reads.
7 (241) Greg

Stroman

CB-5’11 174

Virginia Tech 381 (5th Round) With Stroman’s level of return ability, it is easy to forget that he also broke up 27 passes and picked off 9 passes in school.
7 (256) Trey Quinn

WR-5’11 203

SMU, LSU 227 (4th Round) Mr. Irrelevant caught 114 passes in 2017 after an unsettling stint at LSU. His savvy and quickness earn high marks.

DraftNasty spotlights UCF LB Shaquem Griffin (VIDEO): Equal Footing

Former UCF linebacker Shaquem Griffin posted 175 tackles, 18.5  quarterback sacks, 33.5 tackles for losses, four forced fumbles, two interceptions, 11 pass break-ups and one fumble return for touchdown in his career.  The 2016 AAC Defensive Player of the Year has a non-stop approach that includes 4.38 speed at 227 pounds.  We take a deep dive inside his game after catching up with him during the week of the 2018 Reese's Senior Bowl in Mobile, Alabama.

Missouri WR J’Mon Moore (VIDEO): Give me some Moore

Moore quietly went over the 1,000-yard mark in each of the last two seasons for the Tigers. He and fellow wide receiver Emanuel Hall were a big reason Missouri quarterback Drew Lock broke the single-season record for touchdown passes in the SEC. In DraftNasty's sit down with Moore at the 2018 Senior Bowl, he talked about his angry run after the catch approach, route running and his overall mentality towards the game.

DraftNasty spotlights Tuskegee DB Jonah McCutcheon (VIDEO): McCutcheon’s Climb-Draft Diary, Part I

Former Tuskegee defensive back Jonah McCutcheon finished his career with 14 interceptions and was a three-time 1st Team All-SIAC choice.  McCutcheon was named a 2015 BOXTOROW All-American after posting seven interceptions.  He added to his career totals with an interception in the 2017 FCS Bowl in Daytona Beach, Florida.  In Part I of his diary with DraftNasty, he begins to give a preview of how he wins on the field.

DraftNasty’s Under the Radar, Vol. II: Kalib Woods 6’1 188 WR FAU

Strengths: Four-year contributor. Long, silky-smooth receiver. Plays a little stronger than his size would suggest. As a freshman, he showed enough COD vs. rolled-up coverage. Back then, he was used on possession hitches on the perimeter (Middle Tennessee ’14). As a backside X-WR, he’s made some spectacular high-point TD grabs (Middle Tenn ’14). Body control. Flips his hips well to cross the face of CBs on inside routes (Tulsa ’15). Contorts his body to catch in-breaking routes behind him. Consistently adjusts to ball off-target. He can sink to catch passes low to the turf. Allows his body to die along the sidelines and toe-taps to get his feet in-bounds (Tulsa ’15). Long strider. Covers six-to-six and a half yards on his first four steps. Able to contort his body to maneuver vs. aggressive CBs to draw contact. Uses arms to get a nudge of room on long patterns down the field.

Weaknesses: Off the field concerns. Suspended for the first six games of the 2017 season due to an incident that occurred in early June (http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/fau-owls/fl-sp-fau-owls-news-mon-20170904-story.html).   One of his biggest weaknesses has always come around not truly sinking his hips. Has a tendency to run to the spot and fail to accelerate upon arrival (allows CBs to beat him to the reception point). Raises his frame when chopping into his square-in/dig patterns (Tulsa ’15, Marshall ’17). Does a little too much chopping-and-shaking vs. press on some of his outside releases. Questionable strength holding stalk blocks on the perimeter.

Other Notes:

  • Attended Duncan Fletcher HS (Fla.) and was a three-sport athlete in football, basketball and track & field
  • 2014: 16 receptions for 223 yards (13.9 YPR) and 2 TDs
  • 2015: 27 receptions for 330 yards (12.2 YPR) and 3 TDs
  • Six 100-yard receiving games
  • 2016: 68 receptions for 934 yards
  • 6 receptions for 208 yards and one TD vs. North Texas on 12/2/17
  • 2017 (8 gms): 24 catches for 619 yards (25.8 YPR) and 4 TDs
  • Career Stats: 135 catches for 2,106 yards (15.6 YPR) and 10 TDs
  • 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl measurements: 6023 188 9” hands, 32 3/4” arms, 79 1/4” wingspan
  • 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl In-game report: Kept working vs. stacked double team on the perimeter as a gunner and got in on tackle in the 3rd QTR (4:04). Caught a comeback outside the numbers from Woodside for dying ball.

Summary:  His former offensive coordinator Brian Wright said way back in 2014, “He has the ability to be a great player.” That statement may very well have been true but, much to Woods’ own doing, that statement never truly came to fruition. Where he goes is not as important as to what role he could play for an NFL team. We think he’s capable of contributing on special teams because he showed some upside in kick coverage during the 2017 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl.  However, there are issues about his foot speed. Will he run in the 4.6-range?  Woods has some similarities to former Louisiana Tech wide receiver Quinton Patton (49ers, Jets).

DraftNasty's Grade: 5.361 (4th Round)

Editor's Note: DraftNasty's grades on players are compiled from our eight identifying characteristics and do not constitute a draft projection.

DraftNasty’s Under the Radar, Vol. I: Thomas Owens 6’1 198 (E) WR FIU

Strengths: Body control. Long strider who builds to speed. Adjusts over the wrong shoulder to make tough catches (UCF ’16). He finds a way to win on jump balls through positioning and upper body strength (Tulane ’17-Nickerson; Minter-MTSU ’17). The team moves him both inside and outside in their schemes. No false steps off the ball in his two-point stance if uncovered. Accelerates into slant routes with a controlled straight-stem.  Exhibits nice patience on deep stops outside the numbers. Makes the low-ball scoop snags near the ground. Extends his inside arm to overpower CBs in press coverage (P.I. vs. Jackson, Marshall ’17).  Has won on slant-and-go routes in the RZ (TD, Marshall ’17).

Weaknesses: Does not impress going in to crack block on safeties (Marshall ’17). Allowed a skinny post to slip through his hands vs. Old Dominion in 2014. Covers just five yards in his first four steps. Displays limited energy setting up post-corners as an X-WR. Questionable long gear on nine routes. Sinking at the top of his routes has been an issue dating back to 2014.  Fails to consistently come back downhill for the ball (UCF ’16-PBU, Killings). Knee injury cut short his 2017 campaign.He’s made questionable decisions blocking back towards his GL (clip, UCF ’16). Will run the stutter-and-go outside the numbers (as an X-WR) but does not re-accelerate into the second portion of the pattern.

Other Notes:

  • Attended Atlantic Community HS (Fla.) and played football/basketball
  • Averaged 12.6 PPG in basketball at the prep level
  • 9 receptions for 166 yards vs. Indiana on 9/12/15
  • 2015 (12 sts): 51 catches for 638 yards (12.5 YPR) and 8 TDs
  • 11 catches for 148 yards and 2 TDs vs. Charlotte on 10/15/16
  • 2016 (12 sts, Honorable mention All-C-USA): 47 catches for 652 yards (13.9 YPR) and 7 TDs
  • 11 catches for 162 yards and one TD vs. MTSU on 10/7/17
  • 2017 (9 gms, 1st Team All-C-USA): 59 catches for 887 yards (15 YPR) and 6 TDs
  • Career Stats: 40 games, 157 receptions for 2,177 yards (13.9 YPR) and 21 TDs; One TD pass; 11.4 yds/PR

 

Summary: Owens did not receive a combine invite and he will have to make up for it on his Pro Day. His speed is a question mark entering the postseason. We were impressed with the physicality he showed as a runner after the catch. Look no further than the Middle Tennessee State game as a senior to observe how relentlessly he attacks the football down the field. His tenacity as a blocker was up-and-down for the most part in the film viewed, but it is an area that has improved over the course of his career. The Panthers ranked No. 1 at the FBS level in Red Zone efficiency in 2017. A big part of the reason was Owens’ ability to draw coverage in their balanced attack. He finished his career with 21 touchdown grabs. He has late-round value if he can clear the medical checks on his knee by NFL teams.

DraftNasty's Grade: 5.082 (5th Round)

Editor's Note: DraftNasty's grades on players are compiled from our eight identifying characteristics and do not constitute a draft projection.