Tag Archives: Los Angeles Chargers

Baltimore Ravens vs. Kansas City Chiefs, 12-9-18: In-game report

In a matchup between mentor and mentee, the mentor bested his understudy.  Andy Reid’s Kansas City Chiefs defeated John Harbaugh’s Baltimore Ravens, 27-24, to remain in first place in the AFC.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in- game report:

Travis Kelce

When Kelce is rolling, the Kansas City Chiefs offense is rolling. Teams that have defeated the Chiefs have not been able to completely stop Kelce but have been able to limit his productivity or force him and his team to use more targets to get his catches.  The Los Angeles Rams defeated the Chiefs and even though Kelce had 10 catches for 127 yards, it took him 15 targets to post those numbers.  The Patriots were the Chiefs only other loss this season, they double teamed and chipped Kelce all night and held him to five catches on nine targets for 61 yards.  Against the Ravens, Kelce caught two passes on the first possession of the game and forced a holding call on cornerback Marlon Humphrey that resulted in a touchdown.  For the game, he caught seven passes on nine targets for 77 yards and one touchdown. The Chiefs second-ranked scoring offense and No. 3 ranked passing game are a direct reflection of Kelce’s productivity.  If a team hopes to stop the Chiefs offense, then they must prioritize defending Kelce. 

Ravens defense

Despite giving up catches to Kelce early, Baltimore held the Chiefs to 27 points, tied for their lowest output of the season.  The Ravens forced Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes to drive the length of the field and kept everything in front of them by always keeping a safety deep.  Ravens defensive coordinator Don Martindale also switched up blitz schemes which kept Mahomes off balance and resulted in three sacks.  The Chiefs still managed 92 rushing yards and 347 passing yards but the chunk plays were minimal. The fourth down 48-yard heave across the field from Mahomes to Tyreek Hill was a back breaker for the Ravens. However, besides that play and a screen pass to Spencer Ware, the Ravens didn’t give up a play of more than 25 yards defensively.  Look for the Chiefs division rival, the Los Angeles Chargers, to try and replicate the Ravens defensive game plan when the two teams meet on Thursday.  

Lamar Jackson

The former Louisville quarterback has struggled with turnovers and accuracy issues (58 percent completion percentage, three interceptions and eight fumbles) since he has been under center. However, Jackson has given the Ravens offense a spark because of his running ability and quick passing ability.  Baltimore has went to a more run-pass option attack and one-read passing concepts with Jackson.  Against the Chiefs, the Ravens used their tight end as a motion man to get involved as the lead blocker in power running plays and as a safety option for Jackson in the short passing game. Jackson completed 13-of-24 passes for two touchdowns and ran for 71 yards.  As he gets more comfortable, look for the playbook to expand, but for now Jackson has been productive and has put the Ravens in positions to win.

Denver Broncos vs Los Angeles Chargers, 11-18-18: In-game report

Offensive miscues and special teams errors doomed the Los Angeles Chargers against a division rival. The Denver Broncos ended the Chargers six-game win streak in a hard-fought 23-22 affair.  DraftNasty’s Troy Jefferson gives his impressions in this in game report:

Chargers offensive line

The Chargers offensive line stood out in pass protection against the Broncos, who rank in the top ten in sacks. While San Diego did give up three sacks, two of those were more of a reflection of quarterback Philip Rivers holding on to the ball too long rather than poor offensive line execution.  The Chargers out-gained the Broncos by 154 yards, which is a testament to how the offensive line played. The unit’s best work may have came on a screen pass to running back Melvin Gordon, where offensive lineman Dan Feeney and Michael Schofield III got out in front to pave the way for a 32-yard gain.  Holding a defense that features Von Miller and Bradley Chubb is no easy task, but the Los Angeles Chargers should be proud of the offensive line's performance on Sunday.

Chargers miscues 

Veteran quarterback Philip Rivers will shoulder a fair load of the blame after he threw two interceptions against the Broncos. Despite throwing for 401 yards, the interceptions not only cost the Chargers potential points but allowed Denver to score in both instances.  In addition to subpar quarterback play, the Chargers committed 10 penalties in the first half and settled for two field goals.

"Those are things we've stayed away from -- penalties and turnovers -- but they showed up today.  For whatever reason, I don't know. We'll figure it out, though," head coach Anthony Lynn said in the post game press conference. 

Receiver Keenan Allen was a little less diplomatic.

"I don't think they played well at all," Allen said after the game, via ESPN.com. "We dominated the game. Turnovers, we gave them some points and that's what happened. They suck."

To make matters worse, Mike Badgley missed an extra point in the third quarter. Denver no doubt earned their victory by driving the length of the field to get into field goal range as time expired but leading up to the final drive, Los Angeles certainly squandered plenty of its opportunities. 

Denver rookie playmakers 

Former Oregon running back Royce Freeman has rushed for 382 yards (4.2 YPC) and five touchdowns for the Broncos in 2018 (As of 11/27/18).

The Broncos have a talented trio of rookies to rely on offensively. Running backs Phillip Lindsay and Royce Freeman complement each other well as Lindsay primarily serves as the third down motion back and Freeman the more traditional power back. On the outside at receiver, Courtland Sutton also showed his playmaking ability. Lindsay finished with 106 combined rushing and receiving yards while Freeman had 23 yards rushing and a touchdown.  Sutton caught three passes for 78 yards.  Lindsay, who was undrafted, has been the most productive out of the bunch, rushing for 670 yards and catching 24 passes for 187 yards on the season. If Denver can get more consistent production out of Sutton and Freeman, the Broncos could have a strong young nucleus on offense going forward. 

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: AFC West

AFC WEST

Denver

Broncos

Freeman went over the 100-yard mark 31 times during his four-year run in Eugene.

Notable pick: Chubb will get a lot of one-on-one matchups working opposite Von Miller. It won’t be good for AFC West opponents. Freeman may be the grinder the Broncos need to control the clock and set up the play action pass game for Case Keenum. This could take pressure off of the team’s offensive tackles.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (5) Bradley

Chubb

DE-6’4 269

NC State 1 (1st Round) Chubb took his game to the next level in 2017 by adding a deft swipe move to complement his ability to post tackles. He will get even more tutelage from the NFL’s best in Von Miller.
2 (40) Courtland

Sutton

WR-6’3 218

SMU 28 (2nd Round) Sutton has all of the skills to develop into a No. 1 WR in the NFL. It won’t happen if he doesn’t eliminate the drops that show up once per game.
3 (71) Royce

Freeman

RB-5’11 229

Oregon 27 (2nd Round) He ran for over 5,600 yards and scored 60 TDs in school. At nearly 230 pounds, he runs with a light-footed nature.
3 (99) Isaac

Yiadom

CB-6’1 190

Boston College 166 (4th Round) Yiadom is one of the better cornerbacks in the draft playing with his back to the ball. Despite just adequate recovery speed, his length (32 ¼” arms) increases his recovery ability.
4 (106) Josey

Jewell

LB-6’1 234

Iowa 104 (3rd Round) Jewell’s instincts are top-notch and he is adept at making in-game adjustments to combat offensive personnel.
4 (113) DaeSean

Hamilton

WR-6’1 202

Penn State 63 (2nd Round) Hamilton brings slot quickness and outside wide receiver size to a unit that will move him around to create mismatches.
5 (156) Troy

Fumagalli

TE-6’5 247

Wisconsin 337 (5th Round Fumagalli is yet another pass receiving option for the Broncos in the middle of the field for Case Keenum. He’s not a burner, but he catches everything in his area code.
6 (217) Keishawn Bierria

LB-6’0 230

Washington 342 (5th Round) Back-to-back second-team All-Pac-12 selection was a factor on the kickoff team in school…too.
7 (226) David Williams

RB-5’11 229

Arkansas, South Carolina 301 (4th Round) The Broncos have struck gold in the past with late round running backs. The former Gamecock averaged 5.6 yards per carry for the Razorbacks in a pro-style scheme in 2017.

 

Kansas

City

Chiefs

Nnadi may not look the part, but he produced 9.5 QB sacks and 20.5 tackles for losses for the Seminoles over the last two seasons (2016-17).

Notable pick: Watts was dinged for average workouts prior to the draft. When teams look back at this draft, he could become one of the value picks in this class.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (46) Breeland

Speaks

DL-6’3 283

Ole Miss 77 (3rd Round) Speaks has the look of current Jacksonville Jaguars DL Malik Jackson. Like Jackson, he may be underrated coming out of school. Speaks is athletic enough to play either the end or OLB spots.
3 (75) Derrick

Nnadi

DT-6’1 317

FSU 109 (3rd Round) For a 6-foot-1 defensive tackle, he established lockout on a consistent basis. Very good instincts.
3 (100) Dorian

O’Daniel

LB-6’0 5/8 223

Clemson 162 (3rd  Round) O’Daniel covers the slot, RBs and is an outstanding special teams prospect.
4 (124) Armani

Watts

S-5’10 202

Texas A&M 64 (3rd Round) Watts may have been the most active run-defending safety in the SEC. He contributed 4 INTs in 2017.
6 (196) Tremon

Smith

CB-5’11 186

Central Arkansas 248 (4th Round) Smith was a terror in 2017 once he got his hands on the ball. He drops his weight to sink vs. intermediate routes and plays through the hands of bigger WRs in the Red Zone.
6 (198) Kahlil

McKenzie

DT-6’4 314

Tennessee 338 (5th Round) Despite being a DT in school, the Chiefs plan on moving him to the guard position. He looked good at this spot in pre-draft workouts.

 

Oakland

Raiders

Townsend will be counted on to replace former Oakland punter Marquette King. He produces hang times that average in the 4.6 range and placed 27 punts inside the 20-yard line for the Gators in 2017.

Notable pick: Hall could end up becoming the team’s best find. His collegiate productivity was unmatched and his versatility will open up the team’s defensive fronts. Despite average length for a DT, he produced 29 pass break-ups in school.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (15) Kolton

Miller

OT-6’9 309

UCLA 65 (3rd Round) Miller has rare athleticism for a man of his size. His 23 career starts were a result of missing most of 2016 due to injury. Developing an anchor will be a key for Miller.
2 (57) P.J.

Hall

DL-6’0 308

Sam Houston St. 23 (2nd Round) Hall posted 86.5 tackles for losses in school and blocked 14 kicks. In addition, he found time to post four interceptions.
3 (65) Brandon

Parker

OT-6’7 305

NC A&T 126 (3rd Round) Parker –much like Miller- needs improvement in terms of core strength. Also –like Miller- he has positive finishing instincts as a blocker.
3 (87) Trade from Los Angeles Rams Arden Key

DE-6’5 238

LSU 84 (3rd Round) If he can return to his 2016-form, the Raiders may have gotten another sub-package pass rush threat.
4 (110) Nick Nelson

CB-5’10 200

Wisconsin, Hawaii 60 (2nd Round) Nelson’s meniscus injury prior to the draft caused a slight slide. He may have gone a round higher. Dating back to his days at Hawaii, his footwork has always been his best friend.
5 (140) Maurice

Hurst

DL-6’1 291

Michigan 76 (3rd Round) Medical concerns made Hurst a Day 3 pick.   The Raiders got a player who is instant off the ball and wins with a slippery nature. He will push Eddie Vanderdoes.
5 (173) Johnny

Townsend

P-6’1 211

Florida 437 (5th Round) This may have been the team’s most important pick for its defense. The release of Marquette King necessitated it earlier than expected.   Townsend struggled out-kicking his coverage units in school.
6 (216) Azeem

Victor

LB-6’2 240

Washington 365 (5th Round) It seems like ages since Victor produced 95 tackles and 9.5 tackles for losses (2015). His final season was filled with suspension and off the field issues.
7 (228) Marcell

Ateman

WR-6’4 216

Oklahoma State 213 (4th Round) While not sudden, Ateman is athletic enough use his 78-inch wingspan to dwarf CBs in the Red Zone. Averaged nearly 20 yards per catch in 2017.

 

Los

Angeles

Chargers

Nwosu (No. 42 pictured) not only posted 9.5 QB sacks for the Trojans in 2017, he also broke up 13 passes.

Notable picks: James should be a Day 1 starter. Nwosu could very well do the same. Either way, the selection of Jones may be the most important pick of the first three selections. The Chargers ranked 31st versus the run in 2017.

Round,

Selection,

 

Player School DN Big Board

Rank/

Grade

‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (17) Derwin

James

S-6’2 215

FSU 46 (2nd Round) The Chargers are going to look for James to be an intimidating eighth man in the box as well as the team’s enforcer in the middle of the field.
2 (48) Uchenna

Nwosu

OLB-6’3 251

USC 61 (2nd Round) Nwosu will challenge Kyle Emanuel for playing time immediately at an outside linebacker spot. His ability to affect the three-step passing game was rare in school (20 PBUs).
3 (84) Justin

Jones

DT-6’2 311

NC State 144 (3rd Round) Jones posted 8.5 tackles for loss in 2017. While not a pass rusher, he can hold the point of attack and will be a good rotational player in the Chargers defensive front.
4 (119) Kyzir

White

S-6’2 216

West Virginia 197 (4th Round) White is a good blitz threat with plus upper body strength. His ability to control stalk blockers could land him a spot in sub-packages.
5 (155) Scott

Quessenberry

OC-6’4 310

UCLA 110 (3rd Round) Quessenberry can hopefully improve the Chargers ability to move bodies in the run game.
7 (251) Justin Jackson

RB-5’11 199

Northwestern 265 (4th Round) Jackson’s vision is apparent. Despite a WR-like build, he was tough enough to withstand over 1,100 carries in his career.