2018 NFL Draft recap, pick-by-pick: NFC East

NFC EAST

 

Dallas Cowboys
Vander Esch hopes to bring championships to the Cowboys over the next few years.

Notable picks: Vander Esch may prove to be the difference-maker that the Cowboys envision with his versatility. Armstrong’s uneven pre-draft workouts are not at all an indication of his on-field burst and athleticism. Williams adds some swing backup insurance and could outplay his original draft position.

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (19) Leighton

Vander Esch

6’4 256

Boise State 36 (2nd Round) Athletic former basketball player has to become better in his stack-and-shed. Underrated range in coverage.
2 (50) Connor

Williams

6’5 296

Texas 3 (1st Round) Williams’ injury in 2017 following an inauspicious start to his junior campaign. When he’s on top of his game, the finish is in place.
3 (81) Michael

Gallup

WR-6’1 205

Colorado St. 145 (3rd Round) Gallup wins outside the numbers and plays with a physical style that is even stronger than his sturdy 205-pound nature suggests play-to-play.
3 (82) Tracy

Walker

DB-6’1 195

Louisiana-Lafayette 191 (4th Round) Walker has enough length that he could even get looks at a cornerback spot. A solid tackler, his best football may be ahead of him.
4 (116) Dorance

Armstrong, Jr.

OLB-6’4 257

Kansas 49 (2nd Round) Armstrong, Jr. has an 84-inch wingspan and produced 20 tackles for loss in 2016.
4 (140) Dalton Schultz

TE-6’4 249

Stanford 296 (4th Round) Schultz is an underrated route runner despite producing just 11 third down receptions in school.
5 (171) Mike

White

QB-6’4 223

Western Kentucky 155 (3rd Round) White has all of the tools of an NFL starting quarterback minus the mobility.
6 (208) Cedrick

Wilson

WR-6’3 194

Boise State 78 (3rd Round) Wilson produced like a first-round wideout in the MWC. Will his 4.55 speed translate to the perimeter or will he be relegated to the slot?
7 (236) Bo

Scarbrough

RB-6’1 228

Alabama 308 (5th Round) It may have been a long wait on draft day, but the bruising runner could be a change-of-pace power back if he can contribute on special teams.

 

 

 

New

York

Giants

Hill (No. 98 pictured) ranked as one of DraftNasty's Top 3-4 DEs/DTs available in the 2018 NFL Draft. The former Wolfpack star rushed for over 800 yards and 5 TDs as a senior at the prep level.

Notable picks: Hernandez is a mammoth blocker who wins on man blocks.   If he can win as an angle blocker, it will increase the diversity of the running game.  Hill and McIntosh both will add diversity to a defense that finished 27th against the run in 2017.

Round,

Selection

 

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (2) Saquon

Barkley

RB-6’0 233

Penn State 2 (1st Round) Barkley’s lateral agility is top-notch. How much will he contribute as a check down threat?   Based on his collegiate film, he should line up at a number of spots.
2 (34) Will

Hernandez

OG-6’2 327

UTEP 21 (2nd Round) A behemoth bar room brawler with mass and underrated quickness, Hernandez has to distribute his weight evenly to reach his immense potential.
3 (66) Lorenzo

Carter

OLB-6’5 250

Georgia 68 (3rd Round) Carter has some similarities to current Carolina Panthers DE Mario Addison. Can he create speed-to-power off the edge?
3 (69) B.J. Hill

DL-6’3 311

NC State 22 (2nd Round) Hill’s dependability is aided by an ability to play a bit longer than his 77-inch wingspan would suggest. Makes plays laterally in the run game.
4 (108) Kyle

Lauletta

QB-6’3 222

Richmond 154 (3rd Round) Lauletta –the 2017 CAA Offensive Player of the Year- maintains good posture in the pocket and excels on the hit-and-throw concepts. Posted a 4.07 time in the 20-yard short shuttle at the NFL Combine.
5 (139) RJ

McIntosh

DT-6’4 286

Miami (Fla.) 161 (3rd Round) McIntosh has the size to play either DE or DT.   His 83-inch wingspan complements a light-footed nature. He needs to anticipate snap counts with more consistency.

 

 

Philadelphia Eagles
Former Pittsburgh cornerback Avonte Maddox (No. 14 pictured) played WR, CB, PR KR and the nickel back spot for the Panthers. He will add versatility to the Super Bowl champions' roster.

Notable pick: Maddox is a player who went undervalued due to size and slight durability concerns. His ability to cover the slot could increase some of the packages by DC Jim Schwartz. Schwartz typically likes to rush with four players and Maddox could increase coverage disguises.  The Eagles got three of our top 60 players with their first three selections.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
2 (49) Dallas

Goedert

6’4 260

South Dakota St. 56 (2nd Round) Goedert gives the Eagles two tight ends who can attack vertically in the seams of the field. And he weighs in the 260-pound range.
4 (125) Avonte

Maddox

CB-5’9 183

Pittsburgh 53 (2nd Round) Maddox’s 4.39 40-yard dash at the Combine was only outdone by his 6.51 time in the 3-cone drill. He’s even better on the field than in T-shirts and shorts.
4 (130) Josh

Sweat

DE-6’5 251

Florida St. 58 (2nd Round) Sweat fell due to lingering question marks about his knee.   When he’s feeling good, he can translate speed-to-power with one-hand posts and collapses the edge vs. tackles.
6 (206) Matthew

Pryor

OT-6’6 343

TCU 375 (5th Round) Pryor sits on run defenders with his mammoth size.   He often wins in the first phase of block. 11 ½-inch hands.
7 (233) Acquired from New England Patriots Jordan

Mailata

OL-6’8 346

Australia Rugby player N/A Mailata never played college football, but he ran in the 5.1-range for NFL scouts.

 

Washington Redskins
Settle (No. 4 pictured) posted 19.5 tackles for losses the last two seasons for the Hokies.

Notable picks: Christian will help alleviate the issues the Redskins had last year when injuries beset the offensive line. Can he swing to the center position to challenge incumbent Chase Roullier?  Settle is a player who was once thought of as a potential second-round pick before an uneven postseason.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (13) De’Ron

Payne

DT-6’2 311

Alabama 30 (2nd Round) Payne will help to control the action as a fire-plugging two-gap specialist and occasional one-gap penetrator. Expect to see him aligned over the center in DC Greg Manusky’s three-man fronts.
2 (59) Derrius

Guice

RB-5’11 224

LSU 24 (2nd Round) Guice will have to balance his bullish running style to avoid the injury scrapes that took away time from him as a junior.
3 (74) Geron

Christian

OT-6’5 298

Louisville 79 (3rd Round) Christian’s versatility in school saw him move around during games. He was seen snapping the ball on his Pro Day and it could be a possible transition to a starting role.
4 (109) Troy

Apke

S-6’1 200

Penn State 147 (3rd Round) Apke didn’t make a number of plays off the hash, but he demonstrated range during the week of the 2018 NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and versus Pittsburgh in 2017.
5 (163) Tim

Settle

DT-6’3 329

Virginia Tech 200 (4th Round) Settle’s quickness is aided by power. He will win versus guards or centers and could be a rotational piece on first and second down.
6 (197) Shaun

Dion Hamilton

LB-6’0 228

Alabama 231 (4th Round) Crimson Tide team captain has battled major lower extremity injuries, but he can locate, identify and close once he’s made his reads.
7 (241) Greg

Stroman

CB-5’11 174

Virginia Tech 381 (5th Round) With Stroman’s level of return ability, it is easy to forget that he also broke up 27 passes and picked off 9 passes in school.
7 (256) Trey Quinn

WR-5’11 203

SMU, LSU 227 (4th Round) Mr. Irrelevant caught 114 passes in 2017 after an unsettling stint at LSU. His savvy and quickness earn high marks.

2018 NFL Draft Recap, pick-by-pick: AFC North

Baltimore Ravens
Hayden Hurst (No. 81 pictured) runs over tacklers in a game between the South Carolina Gamecocks and Vanderbilt Commodores at Dudley Field in Nashville, TN Photo by Thomas McEwen/Draft Nasty

Notable pick: Brown could make this a home run in the draft. If his pre-draft workouts were any indication, a simple uptick in work ethic may be in order to match his impressive on-field play. Hurst and Andrews extend the middle of the field from Day 1, as does former New Mexico State high-riser Scott.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (25) Hayden

Hurst

TE-6’5 250

South Carolina 39 (2nd Round Smooth. He even spent a game tracking punts in 2016 (Georgia).   Underrated run after the catch skill.
1 (32) Trade from Philadelphia Lamar

Jackson

QB-6’2 216

Louisville 10 (1st Round) Underrated as a passer, Jackson will make tacklers miss in the NFL…too.
3 (83) Orlando

Brown

OT-6’8 345

Oklahoma 158 (3rd Round) Brown’s barrel-chested approach extended itself into the fourth quarters of games.
3 (86) Mark

Andrews

TE-6’5 256

Oklahoma 92 (3rd Round) Andrews has the ability to run routes from a flexed position and is strong enough to make contested catches.
4 (118) Anthony

Averett

CB-5'11 183

Alabama 206 (4th Round) Averett’s uncle Bryant McKinnie once played for the Ravens.
4 (122) Kenny

Young

LB-6’1 236

UCLA 187 (4th Roiund) Young’s coverage ability is reminiscent to former UCLA LB Jayon Brown (Titans).
4 (132) Jaleel

Scott

WR-6’5 218

New Mexico St. 208 (4th Round) Scott’s one-hand grab vs. Arizona State in 2017 was just one of many spectacular on-ball adjustments he made as a senior. Catch radius (34-inch arms) helps his cause.
5 (162) Jordan

Lasley

WR-6’1 203

UCLA 259 (4th Round) Lasley is a smooth receiver who balanced concentration lapses with an ability to roll speed cuts.
6 (190) DeShon

Elliott

S-6’1 210

Texas 115 (3rd Round) Elliott has some stiffness, but he reacts well breaking downhill on the ball. His eyes have been undisciplined. He has potential as a special teams cover guy.
6 (212) Greg

Senat

OT-6’5 302

Wagner 434 (5th Round) Senat brings an 84-inch wingspan and a look reminiscent to former Boise State Bronco Charles Leno coming out of school.   Leverage issues need to be corrected.
6 (215) Bradley

Bozeman

OC-6’5 317

Alabama  482 (6th Round) More of a position than drive blocker, Bozeman uses his size to win as a run blocker. A lack of foot speed is evident.
7 (238) Zach

Sieler

DE-6’6 288

Ferris State N/A Wins during the second phase of downs. His combination of size and strength could help him land a roster spot.

 

Cincinnati Bengals
Former Texas LB Malik Jefferson (No. 46 pictured) will look to break into a crowded Bengals linebacking corps.
Photo by: Corey Chavous, DraftNasty Magazine

Notable picks: Price has to be able to create more forward movement for what has been a stagnant rushing attack. In addition, his line calls will be important for a unit that struggled giving up sacks. Bates III and Jefferson will have a tough time earning playing time with a number of veterans currently on the roster. The Bengals added quality depth at a number of spots on the defensive side of the ball. Harris may be the surprise of the group.

Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (21) Billy

Price

OC-6’4 306

Ohio State 37 (2nd Round) Price’s addition will help a unit that averaged just 3.6 yards per rushing attempt in 2017.
2 (54) Jessie

Bates III

S-6’1 200

Wake Forest 18 (2nd Round) Bates III’s eye speed is elite and his ball skills are above average. His range could enhance the Bengals’ coverage packages.
3 (77) Sam

Hubbard

DE-6’5 270

Ohio State 50 (2nd Round) Hubbard has impressive change of direction (6.88 3-cone) at 270 pounds. Needs to work on developing more speed-to-power as a pass rusher.
3 (78) Malik

Jefferson

LB-6’2 236

Texas 88 (3rd Round) Jefferson- an underrated blitzer- improved his key-and-diagnose in DC Todd Orlando’s schemes.
4 (112) Mark

Walton

RB-5’10 202

Miami (Fla.) 148 (3rd Round) Walton’s ability to break tackles is aided by an ability to run routes out of the backfield.
5 (151) Davontae

Harris

CB-5’11 205

Illinois State 98 (3rd Round) This is a player who impressed at every stop of the postseason process. He will challenge for playing time either outside or inside due to his physicality.
5 (158) Andrew

Brown

DT-6’3 294

Virginia 125 (3rd Round) Brown never quite lived up to his pre-collegiate hype, but he still produced 26.5 tackles for loss in his career.
5 (170) Darius

Phillips

AP-5’10 188

Western Michigan 190 (4th Round) Phillips, an all-purpose maestro, scored 14 touchdowns five different ways in school. He needs work on his coverage techniques at corner.
7 (249) Logan

Woodside

QB-6’1 213

Toledo 402 (5th Round) Woodside’s proclivity for the big stage shined when facing teams like Miami (Fla.) in 2017. His efficiency, athleticism and moxie make for a good combination.
7 (252) Rod

Taylor

OG-6’3 320

Ole Miss 111 (3rd Round) Taylor has started at LT, RT and RG in school.   He projects inside but could be a backup at a number of spots.
7 (253) Auden

Tate

WR-6’5 228

FSU  239 (4th Round) Tate led the ACC in touchdown receptions as a senior (10), but there are questions surrounding his ability to create separation in short areas.
 

 

 

Cleveland Browns Notable pick: The Browns may have found their new lockdown cornerback in Ward (No. 12 pictured). Could he be an even better version of former Browns Pro Bowler Joe Haden? The team has now created quality depth at the cornerback spot with Ward, Howard Wilson, Boddy-Calhoun, Taylor and recent signee Travis Carrie.
Round,

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Player School DN Big Board

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (1) Baker

Mayfield

QB-6’0 216

Oklahoma 54 (2nd Round) Mayfield’s mentality may be the juice that the Browns need as an organization. He will need to prove he can handle the elements.
1 (4) Denzel

Ward

CB-5’11 183

Ohio State 9 (1st Round) Ward brings immediate nickel potential from Day 1 with his level of footwork and quickness. He will need to improve playing with his back to the quarterback. Rare physical skill-set.
2 (33) Austin

Corbett

OL-6’4 310

Nevada 42 (2nd Round) Corbett- a college LT- can provide assistance at any of four offensive line spots. He is one of this draft’s smartest prospects.
2 (35) Nick

Chubb

RB-6’0 227

Georgia 26 (2nd Round) One of the SEC’s all-time best runners, Chubb will be a workhorse if he can remain healthy.
3 (67) Chad

Thomas

DE-6’5 281

Miami (Fla.) 142 (3rd Round) Thomas may eventually morph into a four-technique DE, but he already can be a factor inside on third downs for Gregg Williams’ multiple fronts.
4 (105) Antonio

Calllaway

WR-5’10 200

Florida 163 (3rd Round) Callaway has to become more consistent in his decision-making both on and off the field. Just as quick as he is fast.
5 (150) Genard

Avery

LB-6’0 248

Memphis 59 (2nd Round) Powerball player who runs over opponents.   Impressed scouts with his 4.5 speed in the postseason.
6 (175) Damion

Ratley

WR-6’3 200

Texas A&M 405 (5th Round) Ratley has 4.4 speed and is shifty after the catch. He will need to eliminate the concentration drops and speed up his release vs. bump-and-run.
6 (188) Simeon

Thomas

CB-6’3 203

Louisiana-Lafayette 625 (7th Round) Off-and-on starter whose size allows him to recover down the field. His cousin, Marvin Bracy, was a two-time All-USA selection in track & field

 

Pittsburgh Steelers Notable pick: Edmunds (No. 22 pictured) will challenge for playing time immediately and put pressure on whoever is in front of him at safety. He could very well play the role of former Steeler and current free agent Mike Mitchell.
Round,

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‘Nasty’ Take:
1 (28) Terrell

Edmunds

S-6’2 220

Virginia Tech 133 (3rd Round) Edmunds has covered the slot, played in the box, and also contributed on special teams. Impressed the Hokies’ coaching staff with his toughness playing through a shoulder injury in 2017.
2 (60) James

Washington

WR-5’11 213

Oklahoma St. 48 (2nd Round) Plays faster than he times in T-shirts and shorts. Has the length of an offensive tackle. Tracks the ball.
3 (76) Mason

Rudolph

QB-6’5 234

Oklahoma State 102 (3rd Round) Rudolph goes into a situation where he can develop behind a quarterback who is similar in size.
3 (92) Chukwuma

Okorafor

OT-6’6 320

Western Michigan 138 (3rd Round) Okorafor actually played LT when Willie Beavers was in school but he will likely project to the right side for the Steelers. He may be a better run than pass blocker.
5 (148) Marcus

Allen

S-6’2 215

Penn State 119 (3rd Round) One of college football’s best tacklers, Allen has to improve his ability to steal second base off the hash.
5 (165) Jaylen

Samuels

AP-5’11 225

NC State 95 (3rd Round) Samuels never seems to be going at a speed where he allows himself to get out of control. While it works offensively, he will need to play with more of a sense of urgency to contribute consistently on special teams.
7 (246) Joshua

Frazier

DT-6’3 321

Alabama 494 (6th Round) Frazier exhibited a powerful long-arm to post back guards and centers. He is active but too often gets tied up losing to the spot.

Washington Redskins, 7th Round, 256th overall selection, Mr. Irrelevant: Trey Quinn WR SMU

18 Trey Quinn 5’11 203 WR-SMU, LSU

What makes this player Nasty....(Strengths): Positive size and measurements. Former high school track star with above average long speed if he can build to it (Tulane ’17). Frequently controls the slot positions for the Mustangs. He’s the team’s move guy with z-in and z-out motion, much like he was during his freshman year at LSU. They’ve even aligned him in an offset RB spot to run trail-seams (SMU ’17). Uses his helmet to move defenders on his straight-stem. Excels running post-corner-post routes from the No. 2 slot position and will beat double teams (UConn ’17-2 TDs, Tulane ’17-TD). As an outside WR (LSU), he would attack the CB’s blind spots and then drop his weight on comebacks (Tabor, Florida ’14). This showed up on occasion at SMU on post-corners from the outside Z-WR position (Tulane ’17). Satisfactory hand-eye coordination. Snatches the ball. He will go low to scoop errant passes off the turf (Florida ’14). Displays little regard for his body attacking the middle of the field (one-hand grab (left) on dig route, Houston ’17). Exhibits body control along the sidelines when running double moves (TCU ’17). The team often put him at the No. 2 weak position in empty to work pivot-returns, quick outs, shallow crossers, digs and post-corners. Works the seams of the field. Deft option route runner (3rd and 3-6). He’s even been used on double passes (TCU ’17). He’s come through for the team in clutch situations with miraculous efforts (4th and 4, 4th QTR, Cincinnati ’17).

Weaknesses: One-year wonder. Got buried on the depth chart at LSU behind ordinary receivers. Why did he leave? Average run after the catch threat with limited wiggle. Will leave passes on the turf. Dropped a shallow crossing route vs. Florida in 2014 with no one around. He also had a drop vs. UConn in 2017. Does not run through the ball on quick drives or slant routes. He was not featured much outside at either LSU or SMU despite having adequate size and speed. May project as a slot-only prospect. While at LSU, he would struggle vs. physical play near the LOS (Florida ’14). CBs can still frustrate him when split outside in press coverage (Lewis, Tulane ’17). Will drift up the field at times on some of his speed cuts on out-breaking routes. Will fall away from punts on occasion when attempting to judge the flight of the ball (Houston ’17).

Other Notes:

  • Attended Barbe HS (La.) and became the national all-time leader in receiving yards (6,566). Set a Louisiana state record for receptions (357)
  • Was named a USA Today 1st Team All-American
  • Two-time Class 5A state finalist in the 100-meters (10.93)
  • Threw a no-hitter in the opening round of the 2008 Little League World Series
  • 2014 (7 sts, LSU): 17 catches for 193 yards (11.3 YPR); One tackle
  • 2015 (2 sts. LSU): 5 receptions for 83 yards
  • 17 receptions for 156 yards and one TD vs. Houston on 10/7/17
  • 17 catches for 186 yards vs. Cincinnati on 10/21/17
  • 2017 (13 sts, 1st Team All-AAC): 114 catches for 1,236 yards (10.8 YPR) and 13 TDs; 1-of-2 passes for 34 yards and one INT; Two tackles
  • 2018 NFL Combine: 9 ¼” hands, 32” arms, 17 reps-225 lbs, 4.55 40-yd, 33 ½” VJ, 9’8” BJ, 6.91 3-cone, 4.19 20-yd SS, 11.4 60-yd LS

Time to get Nasty....Our Summary: Current Arkansas offensive coordinator and former SMU OC Joe Craddock clearly had a plan for Quinn in 2017. Perhaps he watched his LSU film. While there, Quinn ran a number of possession routes off of stack looks or in motion. Many of them were on third downs as a freshman. The decision to leave LSU is still an unknown, but he took full advantage of playing in SMU’s creative scheme this past year. He’s strong, quick and tough. Additionally, he has positive hand-eye coordination. To become a solid slot option in the NFL, he has to create more of an illusion for the defensive back. Despite good timed speed, he sometimes looks as if he’s playing at one clip on Saturdays. While he stems well to move defensive backs off their marks, he is not as decisive the more physical man coverage enters the equation. The former Mustang brings Day 3 value to the 2018 NFL Draft.

DraftNasty's Grade: 5.5 (4th Round)

2018 Big Board Rank: 227

 

DraftNasty spotlights UCF LB Shaquem Griffin (VIDEO): Equal Footing

Former UCF linebacker Shaquem Griffin posted 175 tackles, 18.5  quarterback sacks, 33.5 tackles for losses, four forced fumbles, two interceptions, 11 pass break-ups and one fumble return for touchdown in his career.  The 2016 AAC Defensive Player of the Year has a non-stop approach that includes 4.38 speed at 227 pounds.  We take a deep dive inside his game after catching up with him during the week of the 2018 Reese's Senior Bowl in Mobile, Alabama.

Missouri WR J’Mon Moore (VIDEO): Give me some Moore

Moore quietly went over the 1,000-yard mark in each of the last two seasons for the Tigers. He and fellow wide receiver Emanuel Hall were a big reason Missouri quarterback Drew Lock broke the single-season record for touchdown passes in the SEC. In DraftNasty's sit down with Moore at the 2018 Senior Bowl, he talked about his angry run after the catch approach, route running and his overall mentality towards the game.

DraftNasty spotlights McCutcheon’s Climb (VIDEO): Draft Diary, Part II

In Part II of McCutcheon's Climb, we go inside the training of former Tuskegee defensive back Jonah McCutcheon during his pre-draft training at D1 Mobile in Mobile, Alabama.  His trainers -Rich Myers and Chris McNair- talk about his room for improvement.  In addition, we go in the film room with the three-time All-SIAC and former BOXTOROW All-American to view the game through his lenses.

DraftNasty spotlights Tuskegee DB Jonah McCutcheon (VIDEO): McCutcheon’s Climb-Draft Diary, Part I

Former Tuskegee defensive back Jonah McCutcheon finished his career with 14 interceptions and was a three-time 1st Team All-SIAC choice.  McCutcheon was named a 2015 BOXTOROW All-American after posting seven interceptions.  He added to his career totals with an interception in the 2017 FCS Bowl in Daytona Beach, Florida.  In Part I of his diary with DraftNasty, he begins to give a preview of how he wins on the field.

Q&A with former Michigan OL Mason Cole: ‘Stone Cole’

Cole (No. 52 pictured at LT in the 2015 Buffalo Wild Wings Florida Citrus Bowl) started 51 games for the Wolverines. He was the first true freshman to start on the offensive line in Michigan history.

‘Stone Cole’

DN: You’ve been playing a lot of left tackle this year (2017) and you’ve moved around a little bit all over the place while in school. How has it been getting back to that natural position (center during 2018 Senior Bowl) or a position that at least you’ve had some reps at before?

Cole: Yeah. It felt good. Obviously, at the next level I’ll play wherever I’m needed. But it felt good to be back at center. Something new again, but not really. It just felt good.

DN: In terms of some of your teammates that last year that went through the experience. You had so many of them that actually played down here. How many of those guys have you talked to about some of the thing that they had gone through in the pre-draft process?

Cole: Yeah, almost all of them. Just trying to gather as much intel as possible about this whole process. And they’ve all been helpful. It’s been really good for me to reach out to them and them be really helpful for me.

DN: What was one game you’d want an NFL scout to take a look at in your career?

Cole: I think any of the games against Ohio State.   They’ve had a great defensive line the whole four years I’ve been there. Florida State had a great D-line when we played them last year (2016 Orange Bowl). And Florida both years. Anytime you go against a good defense you’d like to have a scout watch that and see what you do against higher-level talent.

DN: What would you say is your biggest strength and maybe the one thing you want to work on too?

Cole: Strengths. Just being versatile. Like I said, I think I can play wherever the team needs me on the line. My weakness. Probably just need to get stronger overall.

DN: Thanks a lot for your time.

Cole: Thank you.

----DN Staff reports, 2018 Reese's Senior Bowl practices, Day 3

UPDATE: Cole was drafted with the 97th pick of the third round by the Arizona Cardinals in the 2018 NFL Draft.

Q&A with Arizona Wildcats DB Dane Cruikshank: ‘Handling business’

Q&A with Dane Cruikshank, Arizona Wildcats:

DN: Talk about the transition from the junior college ranks (Citrus College-Glendora, California).  You became such a consistent player for the ‘Cats.

Cruikshank: It was easy for me to adapt to it and everything. I had a great coaching staff that helped me out. It wasn’t that big of a difference. There’s a lot of good talent in JUCO that I’ve gone up against that doesn’t get out sometimes just cause they don’t handle their business in school. Luckily for me, I handled my business and actually matured and grew up. I ended up at Arizona and did my thing.

DN: Yeah, one of the big things that stood out not only throughout your career but also out here the in the first day of practice (East-West Shrine practices) is your ability to transition. You have your hips opened to the sidelines and still make the 45-and-90-degree breaks. What do you credit that to? Is it a lot of drill work or is it something that’s just always been natural?

Cruikshank: No, it’s a lot of drill work. I put in a lot of work. Coach Yates (Marcel Yates-2017 Arizona defensive coordinator/cornerbacks coach), Coach Donte Williams (2016 Arizona cornerbacks coach). They both coached me at the University of Arizona. I did a lot of offseason training with them before the season even started, both seasons…my junior season and my senior season. All the work that I put in is actually working out for me. I’m actually transitioning it to the field, just doing my thing out here and just having fun with it.

DN: You had a pretty competitive defensive backfield, in terms of Arizona.  (Demetrius) Flannigan-Fowles and some of the other guys. How did you feel about the competition? Did y’all have inner competition on who would make the most plays?

Cruikshank: Yeah, we went at it every day. Every day we came out with a goal. Who is going to come out with the most interceptions, who is going to come out with the most pass deflections, things like that. That just keeps our juices going, you know what I’m saying. That just keeps it more competitive every day at practice. So you’re not slouching around and getting used to everything. We’re competitors man, all those guys.

Cruikshank (seen picking off a pass during 2018 East-West Shrine practices) posted 76 tackles this past season. He intercepted both USC's Sam Darnold and UCLA's Josh Rosen in 2017.

DN: Looking at some of our notes, against Houston earlier this year. Your tackling coming off the edge, and tackling in general. You had 60 tackles in 2016 and quite a few this year.

Cruikshank: 76.

DN: 76 this year. So, run support, talk a little bit about that and what that means to you in terms of your game.

Cruikshank: Well I feel like I can play anywhere on the field in the secondary. I just feel like I can just get the job done no matter where you put me at: strong safety, free safety, corner, nickel. So, I’m a physical player. I like to come up and tackle. I’m not afraid to put my nose in the hole and hit someone. I give that credit to my Dad. He made me a rough player growing up.

DN: That’s what up man. What position do you want to play at the next level? What do you think is your best position?

Cruikshank: Cornerback. I feel like corner is just the best position for me. Don’t get me wrong, I feel like I can play anywhere on the field like I said.

DN: If you had to look at one player that you pattern your game after at the next level who would that be?

Cruikshank: Xavier Rhodes (Minnesota Vikings). Guys with longer arms, Marcus Peters (Los Angeles Rams) guys like that. I look at a lot of film on those guys and I just try to take after them.

DN: No doubt man, thanks a lot for your time and good luck the rest of the year and in the NFL Draft.

Cruikshank: Thank you. I appreciate it.

---2018 East-West Shrine practices, West Team, Day 1, DraftNasty staff reports

UPDATE: Cruikshank was selected by the Tennessee Titans in the 5th Round (152nd overall) of the 2018 NFL Draft.